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Top two pair on a 10 9 2 flop

 
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Top two pair on a 10 9 2 flop - Tue Feb 08, 2011, 07:48 PM
(#1)
oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
BronzeStar
I limped in from the HJ figuring I could see a cheap flop and because I was tired of raising every time I entered the pot.

PokerStars No-Limit Hold'em, $0.05 BB (8 handed) - PokerStars Converter Tool from FlopTurnRiver.com



Button ($12.50)
SB ($5.95)
BB ($1.83)
UTG ($2)
UTG+1 ($3.04)
MP1 ($6.20)
oriholic (MP2) ($5.43)
CO ($2)

Preflop: oriholic is MP2 with 10, 9
3 folds, oriholic calls $0.05, CO (poster) checks, 2 folds, BB checks

Flop: ($0.17) 9, 2, 10 (3 players)
BB bets $0.11, oriholic raises to $0.30, 1 fold, BB raises to $1.07, oriholic calls $0.77

Turn: ($2.31) 8 (2 players)
BB bets $0.71 (All-In), oriholic calls $0.71

River: ($3.73) A (2 players, 1 all-in)

Total pot: $3.73 | Rake: $0.18

So the question is what should I have been thinking when I was reraised on the flop? I figured I was ahead, maybe a lucky 10 2 in the BB or slow playing a big pair. When I got reraised I threw out hands like JQ. His actions all line up perfectly with his actual hand. But how was I doing against his range here? I know if I'm behind I'm toast, because my 9s and 10s are likely not even outs... I was getting about 2 to 1 when he reraised me on the flop (though I know I was committed if I called) ... Should I dump top two pair here or did I play it right?
 
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Tue Feb 08, 2011, 07:54 PM
(#2)
joker41673's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,850
never heard HJ used before
what does it stand for?

 
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Tue Feb 08, 2011, 09:44 PM
(#3)
ClubbedNuts's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 61
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joker41673 View Post
never heard HJ used before
what does it stand for?

Hi-Jack is the spot before the cut-off..
 
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Wed Feb 09, 2011, 12:12 AM
(#4)
oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joker41673 View Post
never heard HJ used before
what does it stand for?


Depends if you're talking to a poker player or....

For poker it's the hijack spot, the seat before the cutoff.
 
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Wed Feb 09, 2011, 04:13 AM
(#5)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
I don;t really see anything wrong here.

You spec enter in reasonable position with a nice hand to do it.

Looks like the dynamic is pretty tight, since only you, the BB, and the poster see the flop for a limp.

You hit the flop hard with top 2, on a pretty dry board.

He leads, you RR to an easily committable Stack to pot ratio of about 2.4. The fact he raises you again, for almost all his stack, is pretty moot: your raise to 30c was jsutified by top 2, and thus calling his re-raise to 1.07 is good as well.

In this spot, you are either facing a hand you can beat (top pair/good kick, over pair, lesser 2 pair), or you are facing a flopped set. Doesn't matter though really, since your raise to 30c sealed the deal...

As for whether you put him in right there, or let him do it on the turn also makes no difference; you are so deep now yu are calling his last 71c.

My guess is he had AT, and you lost, right?

Regardless of the result, if you are gunna play T9s for a limp, you kinda gotten play it when you flop as good as top 2 pair. So whether he did flop a set, flop top/top and rivered you, or whatever, I see absolutely nothing "wrong" in this hand.

Well played.
 
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Thu Feb 10, 2011, 09:51 PM
(#6)
BakedSalmon's Avatar
Since: Jan 2011
Posts: 3
BronzeStar
So why not shove the flop after his reraise? were you going to fold if he put in the rest of his $.71?
You will get called by pair and TP plus other trash they decide to donk.
You are losing to a set which will happen occasionally here but not enough for us to not get it in on this spot w/ the shortstack.
 
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Fri Feb 11, 2011, 10:36 PM
(#7)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakedSalmon View Post
So why not shove the flop after his reraise? were you going to fold if he put in the rest of his $.71?
You will get called by pair and TP plus other trash they decide to donk.
You are losing to a set which will happen occasionally here but not enough for us to not get it in on this spot w/ the shortstack.
He certainly could have re-shoved. He doesn't HAVE to though, since as you point out, he isn;t folding at that point anyway...

...and by "He", I mean both the hero and the villain.

So shoving the 71c or not is kinda 6 of 1, half dozen of the other.
 
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Sat Feb 12, 2011, 02:16 PM
(#8)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,510
(Head Trainer)
Stack to pot ratio is the preflop pot size to the remaining stacks JD, not after flop action occurs.

Personally I would opt to put him all in right on the flop. There are a lot of turns that will be action freezing, he clearly has a hand or draw he likes, so get his money in right now. Please don't fold top 2 on the flop here, you're ahead the vast majority of the time. If he has 22, nh, bink a T or 9.
 
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Sat Feb 12, 2011, 08:39 PM
(#9)
nanonoko's Avatar
nanonoko
(nanonoko)
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
Supernova
Hi there,

There wasn't much behind when he reraised you again on the flop that I would have just got all of the money in at that point. As played, I would like my hand in this spot. Remember you did limp, so the blinds can easily have any random cards which can hit 2pair. You have the best 2pair so you are really crushing the smaller 2pairs. Also you would think that sometimes, he would raise preflop w/ 99 or TT so it makes it less likely for him to have those hands. Only 22 really crushes you but you crush more hands than hands that crush you. So I would get it in!

Hope that helps,
Randy Lew
 

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