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playing multiple tables...what do you think?

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playing multiple tables...what do you think? - Sun Mar 06, 2011, 04:53 AM
(#1)
deezer_dee's Avatar
Since: Nov 2010
Posts: 139
BronzeStar
started doing this frequently a few weeks back and have been losing. down about $100 cos i have been aggressively trying to build a bankroll. mostly i have been playing FL HE and over the last couple of days i've checked my attitude and have just been playing for fun. obviously i want to make money but i'm not so focused on that now.

the last couple of days i've been playing the same game but just playing one table - i find i'm making better decisions and not losing. just played for about an hour and made a good profit because i'm playing better poker. screwed up on one hand but overall made a good profit. i even stepped up in stakes; usually play $.25/.50 but today played $.5/1, this way i can feel only playing one table is more interesting.

i can only assume that when i play multiple tables at once that i play draws more aggressively, let pride mess with me, make loose calls and loose bets because i'm not as focused. don't think about pot odds etc. do you guys think it's a skill you have to develop (playing more than one table)? i'm amazed seeing PS pros playing 12 tables at once and playing good poker. i'm sure many of you play more than one table at once; do you feel it detracts from your game or maybe you think that sacrifice is compensated with the profit of playing more than one table? how long did you play for before being confident in your game playing multi tables?
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 06:42 AM
(#2)
bogweed1964's Avatar
Since: Jan 2010
Posts: 774
I used to multi-table MTT's a lot but found I would naturally focus more attention on the table(s) I was being most succesful on, as a consequence I would generally fade into oblivion on the other tables.

The major problem is lack of focus on studying the opponents at each table, no time for note taking and relying solely on playing the cards rather than the opponents too and by doing so making not fully informed decisions.

I try to restrict myself now to a couple of tables and usually different formats, so I'll play an SnG or MTT with a ring table ticking over on the side, in this way I can always sit out on the ring if I need to focus more on the tourney action.
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 12:10 PM
(#3)
RockerguyAA's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,089
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I recently started playing 6 six-max no-limit micro cash tables at a time. It is an acquired skill that you get through experience. It takes a decent amount of time to gain as well. Try playing 2 tables until you feel equally as comfortable at 1 or 2. Once you are there you can try expanding to 3 or 4. If you are really worried about it, just try 3. Basically you just play whatever amount of tables your at until you are very comfortable, then you can push yourself above comfort level slightly by adding 1 or 2 tables extra.

You shouldn't really be playing differently when you add more tables. That is a sign that you are in over your head. I guess if that happens when going to 2 tables, just spend some more time playing 1...

p.s. Nanonoko(Team Pokerstars Pro Online Team) plays up to 24 cash tables at a time, there are a couple of videos/audio recordings where he talks a little bit about how he learned to multi-table.
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 12:11 PM
(#4)
autodafe20's Avatar
Since: Jan 2011
Posts: 142
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With one table I tend to overanalyze, I actually tend to do better making snap decisions at 6 tables at a time, even though I find it annoying. If you are multi-tabling it's better to stick to the basics with a few change-ups so it's harder for someone to put you on a hand.
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 01:18 PM
(#5)
Cyis's Avatar
Since: Jul 2010
Posts: 193
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I started multi-tabling back in Jan & Feb but have moved to only playing one table at a time now, and even only one session per day. I've seen a considerable improvement on my returns by doing so thus far. Like yourself I'm playing FL tables, but I'm playing O/8 rather than HE. In playing only one table I also moved up a blind level than what I was playing multi-tabled and was pleasantly surprised to see the results it's garnered so far.

The only multi-tabling I've done so far this month is when I've been playing on a O/8 ring game while playing in the NLHE Warmup qualifier and PSO tourneys which I've also been showing improvement in by not playing as many as I have in past months. Still room for improvement but it's been steady upward progression thus far.
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 01:48 PM
(#6)
TOO2COO's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,882
(Super-Moderator)
If ya not Multi the easiest way to get a feel is to start playing just 2 tables once you get a good feel adding more tables is just a Natural Progression
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 03:50 PM
(#7)
topthecat's Avatar
Since: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,962
I have a tendency to agree with the guys who find that multi-tabling is not as profitable, although I suppose it is horse for courses.

Nevertheless, when I look at the profile of the players on ring games playing 15, 20,30 or 40 tables I just do not understand how they could be evaluating other players in their decision making process. Now I know there is software out there that will assist in this (Huds; whatever that means) but if you ar playing 40 tables how the hell do you have time to even look at your Hud (no double entendre intended!), never mind anything else.

I watched a few videos on that Nanu guy and some other guy of far eastern descent who got super nova elite in less than two months, sorry but I forget his name but there were days he was down over 50K. These guys are clicking their mouse four or five times a second, so unless they have extra brains installed somewhere, I cannot possibly see how their decisions are based on more than playing a range of hands which they have decided to play.

One thing I do notice is that these multi-tablers bet aggressively but if you have a hand worth betting back with they often lay down. If they miss the flop, they will, more often than not, lay down to any bet. So I think they can be quite predictable in how they play.

Obviously, they play a numbers game and I do not underestimate their poker skill either, but it must be pretty hard work on the old noggin. I expect most multi-tablers just have a knack for it.
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 06:14 PM
(#8)
Da Sens Fan's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,118
Quote:
Originally Posted by topthecat View Post
I watched a few videos on that Nanu guy and some other guy of far eastern descent who got super nova elite in less than two months, sorry but I forget his name but there were days he was down over 50K. These guys are clicking their mouse four or five times a second, so unless they have extra brains installed somewhere, I cannot possibly see how their decisions are based on more than playing a range of hands which they have decided to play.
You are probably referring to nanonoko:



Agreed that it does take time to get used to and that slowly adding 1 table at a time is probably the best way to go about it. Regarding hud's and how people have time seeing them. In response to that, they are right by the persons avatar so it's impossible to miss them Also very helpfull to have

Last edited by Da Sens Fan; Sun Mar 06, 2011 at 06:23 PM..
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 10:11 PM
(#9)
RockerguyAA's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,089
BronzeStar
I think most of the people playing 30+ tables are playing all SNG's. They are probably following, well trying to follow, an optimal strategy. They look at their position, the stack sizes, and their hand and make a decision they think is in-line with the optimal play. They cannot possibly make reads on other players, but most use HUD's I would assume. After playing for some time their HUD's should give then semi-accurate information on how aggressive/passive loose/tight etc their opponents are. It is cheap in my opinion, but it is what it is.
 
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Sun Mar 06, 2011, 11:06 PM
(#10)
Deleted user
Only area I play 24 tables is 2NL-5NL and it is strictly for bonus whoring.

I prefer to just move up and play 2 tables,I catch so much more and can lay better traps.

6 tables -10 tables is my usually if I find Im a little skittish or jumpy for the day.
Gets me from overplaying a hand that will screw my whole session.
One thing I have noticed,is you have to have tilt under control big time.
Playing a ton of tables and losing a big hand can cost you on more than one table since they pop up so frequent.
 
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Mon Mar 07, 2011, 07:43 AM
(#11)
Mmmm Fish's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 705
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Multi-tabling is among the many skills need to advance in the world of online poker.

Profitability comes down to hourly rate, not EV. Say you can beat four games comfortably for a dollar an hour each. Now say you move up to six games and your win rate goes down to eighty cents per table. You are now making an additional eighty cents an hour.

Multi-tabling is also needed to overcome variance. With enough volume, your suckouts will wash away your bad beats.

Supernovas can break even with their bankroll and still make over $100,000 a year in bonuses and perks. The one thing all Supernovas have in common is they are effective at multi-table play.

A good place to practice high volumn is the $0.25 45-player S&Gs. If you pop up sixteen at once, you are only in for $4 and the games are soft enough, when the last hand is dealt, you have a great chance at showing a profit.
 

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