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AQ facing PF 4-bet from TAG

 
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AQ facing PF 4-bet from TAG - Mon Apr 11, 2011, 12:12 PM
(#1)
xxbeanxx's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 3
I am pretty sure I made a good play here but just would like some opinions on what options I had. The guy was playing really tight and had folded to three of my 3-bets so far this session.

I guess what I'm really wondering is should I have called here because the stacks were so deep. I know 5-bet shoving is a losing move.

 
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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 12:18 PM
(#2)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,832
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
With someone playing tight like you said, and 4-betting to open, then 3-betting your raise.... you're more than likely behind and could easily be dominated too. Sounds like AA, KK, QQ or AKs. Any of those, you're in deep trouble. IMO, I think it's a good fold.

Even if you hit an A or Q on the flop, you could still be behind pretty easily..... then it'd cost you even more chips.
 
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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 12:52 PM
(#3)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,512
(Head Trainer)
Super easy fold to his 4b.

As an aside, don't 3b with AQs, flat his open raise in position. When you 3b this guy you're just going to force him to play perfectly against you, folding out worse hands and getting action from better. If you flat, you get to play against his entire preflop range (even for a tight player AQs fairs well against the bottom of his opening range). And, more importantly, by keeping the effective stacks deep you'll be able to win many pots post flop by using your positional advantage, as the nit will rarely make a hand he's willing to play for stacks this deep and you'll be able to take most of the pots where he misses, and confront him wiht difficult decisions on scary boards even when he has a made hand like an overpair.
 
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?? - Mon Apr 11, 2011, 12:54 PM
(#4)
monkeyskunk4's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,818
maybe - he had the same read on you-???- or was just plain pyssed that he had folded 2 many times to your 3- bet-- iffa he was pyssed--and had nadda- i dont think he only 3x ure 3-bet- i think he shuv-- pretty sure he had the goods there-- jmo--
 
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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 05:21 PM
(#5)
xxbeanxx's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 3
Thanks for the great info everyone.

Had I just called and an ace flopped, do I lay it down to aggression? I think that is the reason I generally raise with these hands, to get an idea of where I am at.

If an ace does flop and he bets in to me, do I call or raise? What would keep him from going ott with AJ if I raise a flop bet? Should I rule out AJ since it's not a good 4-bet hand? I am really bad in these situations.

I guess what I'm asking is, if I do flat preflop, how could the hand play out such that I am confident in putting money in?
 
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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 05:45 PM
(#6)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,832
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
if you flat preflop, you're looking for a Q high board or spades. Either of those, then you continue betting. If you miss the flop flatting, you're probably behind if they raise and you'll need to then muck it.

I'd probably rule out AJ, unless it's suited. That big of a raise normally wouldn't be from a hand with a 2-gap between cards, normally for high pairs or big suited connectors (AKs).
 

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