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Blind vs Blind (from the SB)

 
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Blind vs Blind (from the SB) - Sun May 01, 2011, 08:45 PM
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TrustySam's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
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I got transferred to this table about an hour in, so I'd been there about 45 minutes and had yet to see this person play a hand, and didn't know how they played post-flop. I was a little surprised to see their hand when they turned it over, but I guess somebody who better ranges hands would have thought of it. Not sure whether different raising could have altered the outcome, so I'm eager to get peoples' thoughts. Thx for the help!



Here's the hand with the BB's hole cards turned over in case anybody wants to see:

 
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Sun May 01, 2011, 08:55 PM
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The only way I put him on what he had was if he thought you were totally bluffing. He did have mid pair on the flop, but I like your raise pre (I might have raised an extra BB which may or may not have gotten him to drop it) and you definitely have to bet the flop to see where you're at, when you hit top pair. The turn was extremely unlucky for you and I would have bet it too.

I thought from watching your first one that he could have had 8/10s or even A 3 (knowing you lost from your other post), but I would not have put him on 3 10 off.
 
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Sun May 01, 2011, 09:15 PM
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Thx JWK ... yeah, a 2bb bet is kind of in no-man's land, isn't it? I felt like my hand was pretty good compared to the usual bb and sb fare, but there's always that worry that what if the person has AJ or something like that. Then I ended up in the middle of the road. I guess if I was going to play, I shouldn't have let them in for so cheap, eh?

And then I was so caught off guard by the reraise, I just wasn't even thinking hands - probably most people playing the sb in this hand would have thought A3 and at least paused for a minute ... maybe even folded. I guess it wasn't important to have T3 in mind so much as it was to note the signs that they could very well have just made 2pr on the turn. Reraise from somebody who's tight and has just been calling up to then probably should have been a huge red flag ... I'll have to keep that in mind. D'oh!

Thanks so much for the input!!
 
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Sun May 01, 2011, 11:36 PM
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You could shove preflop. And a shove here is unexploitable, ie. you could show your hand and it would still be a +EV shove. Say he calls with A7+, A7s+ and any pair. (I think he's supposed to fold 22, but he probably calls as he's ahead).

84% of the time he folds, 16% he calls. When he calls, he wins 58.93%, you win 30.79%, and you chop 5.14%

(.84)(225)+.16*((.5893)(-2180)+(.3079)(2180+225)+(.514)(.5)(225))=111.18

So it's unexploitable for you to shove A7 suited from the SB
 
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Sun May 01, 2011, 11:46 PM
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TrustySam's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oriholic View Post
You could shove preflop. And a shove here is unexploitable, ie. you could show your hand and it would still be a +EV shove. Say he calls with A7+, A7s+ and any pair. (I think he's supposed to fold 22, but he probably calls as he's ahead).

84% of the time he folds, 16% he calls. When he calls, he wins 58.93%, you win 30.79%, and you chop 5.14%

(.84)(225)+.16*((.5893)(-2180)+(.3079)(2180+225)+(.514)(.5)(225))=111.18

So it's unexploitable for you to shove A7 suited from the SB
You know what, it never occurred to me to shove - I had them covered worst-case scenario, and that's where we ended up eventually.

I guess I was just hoping they'd fold and I could do it on the 'cheap'. Except I lost like 2000 chips or whatever

I'll have to add that option to my 'playbook' ... thx oriholic

(I'm gonna have to go over the math a couple (hundred) times more LOL, but I got the general idea )
 

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