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Causeway Freeroll [$100 Added] - Heads Up @ Final Table - Malaysia vs Singapore

 
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Thu Jun 23, 2011, 02:49 PM
(#1)
PlsDntBlffMe's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 42
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Last edited by PlsDntBlffMe; Mon Apr 16, 2012 at 01:29 PM..
 
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Thu Jun 23, 2011, 05:35 PM
(#2)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,788
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with them pushing a real short stack into me with 78s... it's a snap call for me. You made the correct play on that hand, just got unlucky.

The AK hearts hand, I'd have pushed with it heads-up, just as you did. They got EXTREMELY lucky.

68 hand... good call by you when they missed their flush draw. I'd have been out of that one early.

KJo.... I may have folded that one, depending on what my gut said. They were playing a real wide range though... which would make me want to call it more. I was actually surprised with them having KQ, as I put them on some sort of ace or a pair with the shove back.. probably an A, which is why I may have mucked it.

For me and what I've seen and played... heads-up situations are played alot more on reads, than on the actual cards. If you want to win in them consistantly, you need to be able to read your opponents and the way they are betting alot more than at a standard table.

Trying to beat someone just because they're a supernova is a BAD IDEA. You know they play for a bunch of $$$ online, but going out of character and trying other plays that are iffy, just because of their rating will only get you into trouble. They may get the benefit of the doubt that they are not a clueless player... but shouldn't be treated any differently than any other player that has a clue. I've seen plenty of gold/platinum star players at my table that although they do play for alot of $$$ to get those ratings, they don't have a clue. I've also seen some bronze/silvers that could give anyone on stars a legit run for their $$$.
 
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Thu Jun 23, 2011, 06:21 PM
(#3)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
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Hand #1: 87s vs BTN all in totalling 23.4k

You start the hand as the prohibitative chip leader (~ 8 to 1 advantage).
Realistically, in these spots PATIENCE is often the key to winning.

Your short stack opponent still has ~10BB, and open jams from the button.
You CALL with 87s. Why?

87s is a much better hand to act agressively with, since you will tend to fold out quite a few BETTER hands with a raise (in most cases), but are usually not in a dominated situaton if you are called. When you CALL with it though, you are almost never ahead, and you are guarenteeing a showdown (in this spot).

Combine this with the fact your opponent MUST double up or be faced with an extreme short stack situation at the next blind increase, and your call simply set it up for him to be a favorite to get his critically needed double up.

Had YOU raised this hand on the button then saw him jam, and then saw decent pot odds to call, I'd feel far differently about this play. But simply calling the open jam this lightly will usually result in exactly what happened.

Hand #2: AKs vs AQo, Villain raises standard on BTN, you jam over him.

With you holding still a 3+ to 1 lead, this hand is really just "bad luck".
He raises a pretty standard amount, and you recognize the "strength" of AKs and jam.

If it were earlier in the event, this might be a way TOO risky play to make, as you are "behind" even a small pocket pair.
But in this spot you aggressively move at the pot with a hand which is racing (at least) everything EXCEPT AA/KK.
Your re-raise all in puts him to a "test", and he "fails" that test by calling with a dominated hand (granted, being that short, the villain cannot afford to fold AQo here, but THAT is what makes your jam so nice).

It is all down to luck at that point, and his 28% (roughly) chance to win came through.
Too bad this essentially evened up the match.

Hand #3: 86o in BB for you, Villain raises a standard amount (small sized though, ~1.5 x BB), and you flat.

In this pot, you've fallen behind and that means now YOU must find ways to get some chips.
In a heads up spot, even oop I have no real issue with calling a small-ish pre-flop raise with a "weak" hand like 86o.
The 4.5k call is a relatively small portion of your stack, any pair is likely to be "good" heads up, and any un-paired hand will tend to miss the flop about 2/3rds the time.

Flop comes KJ3 with 2 diamonds, and it checks through.
The turn hits your 6 for 3rd board pair, and you lead for about 1/2 pot.

I like that play really, simply because the presence of the potential straight draw and the possible flush draw on the flop means the Villain would have been pretty "wrong" to NOT bet a K or J in his hand. Since he checked behind on the flop, you can be pretty sure he hasn't got much here.
Your BIGGEST worry is that he holds a pp 77+, but your half pot bet does not stick you too hard.
When he does NOT raise your bet, you can remove a big partof the chance he hodls 77+.

When the top pair K pairs on the river, you check. I see no problem with this at all, and actually quite like it.
Your pair of 6's looks to be good here a lot of the time, and while the check doesn;t put more value in for you, your hand strength really is more in line with CALLING value, not betting/raising value. I say this because oop, the only thing likely to call any bet by you is a better hand. This makes your hand a nice "bluff catcher".

Suddenly, the opponent launches a big river bet (slightly over pot size). WTF?
If he had a K in his hand, why wasn't he betting earlier to keep you from flush drawing?
If he had a J in his hand, why didn;t he bet earlier to ive more info about whether you held a K?
If he had 77+, then when you bet the 6, why didn't he 3Bet when it appeared pretty likely YOU did not hold a K or J?

All in all, he made a pretty weak river bluff bet based on this bettin dynamic, and I think you made a pretty good, and well reasoned, call here. I think you ere either facing areal MONSTER, or exactly what you saw, "cheese". Your need for chips made it prefectly proper for you to risk running into a monster for the chance you would snap off "cheese", and re-gain the lead.

Hand #4: AJo for you in the BB, Villain opens jams just under 11BB.

This is a hand with a similar decision process to hand #1. You must decide, based on your range read of the opponent, whether AJo is ahead far enough, and often enough, to make a call worthwhile. If you do, and you are "right", you potentially end the event a winner. If you do call, and are wrong, you are giving the Villain despretely needed "life".

These sorts of decisions are CRITICAL to finishing off opponents in heads up matches, and the sharper your read ranges are when you are "forced" to call their shoves, the more effective you will tend to be in HU matches in the long run. One thing I'd note: if you do NOT feel your read range is "sharp", it IS possible to dump even hands this big in the vital "swing spots". It is far better to fold a semi-"big" hand here and give up a single BB, than CALL a shove "incorrectly", and give the Villain the overall chip lead (again). With that said...

I really cannot make any judegment about your decision here, because you do not give any indication of a read range.
I will say that I am much more prone to calling these jams, than folding AJo here though, and I "like" a call here by you a LOT more than I do with 87s.

Obviously, the "results" show that the call was correct, since the Villain jammed KQo, but if KQo was the BOTTOM of his shove range, then foling AJo would not have been bad here at all.

After you do call though, it comes down to about a 60/40 race, with you ahead. His 40% hits though, and he re-gains the lead. It happens.

Hand #5: You = KJo on BTN, and you raise a small standard amount. He jams over the top, and you call.

With 12BB, I am not certain I "like" the call of his push. Think back to your AKs hand, and consider how well KJo plays versus even a LOOSE shove range here.

At best you are racing from a bit behind versus a pp TT-.
You are likely facing at least a rag A, and versus A2o you are only about 43% to win.
Is he REALLY likely to Jam K9/KT or QJ/QT here?

I am thinking this is a spot you could have used your small standard open raise as a reason to FOLD, and look for a better spot to be the aggressor all-in, rather than passively callign all-in. You must remember, if you bet or raise you have 2 ways to win (having the best, or getting better to fold), but when you CALL you have only 1 way to win (by holding the best). As you;ve seen, 10BB is plenty to see a drastic "swing" in the chip stacks, so you were not so short by folding here that you could NOT come back.

Overall, good game, and get 'em next time!
 
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Thu Jun 23, 2011, 08:42 PM
(#4)
oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
BronzeStar
Hand 1, I don't understand calling with 87 suited. How often are you the favorite there? I'd be jamming it all day on those stacks, but not calling with it. Buuuut....calling with such a weak hand gives you fear equity. It tells him you are willing to call wide and he better have the goods if he wants to shove.

Hand 2, perfect, just unlucky.

Hand 3, perfect.

Hand 4, perfect just unlucky.

Hand 5, with 15 BBs you could probably just jam KJ. If he were playing shove/fold I call KJ here since he's pushing so wide, but look how he played that T8 suited hand earlier. He did not jam it, which means his shoving range is semi-tight. On 15 BBs if you were planning on calling a shove you should have just shoved it yourself. I hate wasting the chips, but after raising I'd fold here and try to come back. His shove range just doesn't seem wide enough. Raise-folding is bad for you though, Just shove it.
 
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Fri Jun 24, 2011, 03:24 PM
(#5)
PlsDntBlffMe's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 42
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Last edited by PlsDntBlffMe; Mon Apr 16, 2012 at 01:30 PM..
 
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Fri Jun 24, 2011, 03:32 PM
(#6)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,788
(Super-Moderator)
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if you're steaming or on tilt... unfortunately, the only way to learn from it is when it happens to you and to try and avoid it in the future. I've had it happen to me a few times online and once live.... until it happens, you can try to avoid it, but you won't truely learn from it until you do it the hard way. At least that's how it's worked for me.
 

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