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PSO League (What do you think they have?)

 
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Sun Jun 26, 2011, 07:23 PM
(#1)
PlsDntBlffMe's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 42
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Last edited by PlsDntBlffMe; Mon Apr 16, 2012 at 01:32 PM..
 
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Sun Jun 26, 2011, 07:59 PM
(#2)
pokerstar671's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,206
hey man after the flop i would have bet the pot or 250 just to see what happens.
 
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Sun Jun 26, 2011, 08:13 PM
(#3)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
PSO is ALL about "ladder climbing", and risk avoidance. This is true for 2 major reasons:

1) The amount of chips needed to last 100 to 150 spots is just too SMALL to risk speculative ventures, even ones this small.

2) The penalty for an early exit is jsut too severe to make getting involved in many pots early one close to worthwhile.

In this spot, as counterintuitive as it may seem, you need to play your 2 pair hand PASSIVELY, to avoid chip loss. Adopting a severe pot control line (check/calling is a very WEAK form of pot control afterall) not only reduces your overall risk of chip loss, but also prevents the pot from growing to a size where someone who is not playing for league rank will "care" about making a big bluff.

If you consider that the overall passive pre-flop dynamic of many PSO events plays into a lot of the tendencies of WEAK players, it should not be surprising to find any sort of draw which "gets there" has hit SOMEONE in a 4 or 5 way pot. Again, a passive line tends to "save" you chips when hands like your K5 2 pr gets run down by someone who cannot fold a flush or straight draw.

So...

As wierd as it may sound, I would have FOLDED this hand pre-flop, even versus a min bet.
I simply will NOT flop "enough" with it to make a standard betting line "reasonable", and the chips I may SAVE by not flopping a good but 2nd best hand makes it far better to dump these early.

For PSO play, it is MUCH preferable to play the "uber-nit", and wait for truly STRONG hands. You can tend to play these quite hard pre-flop, will generally get only a caller or 2 when you do, and even that "smallish" chip up will tend to go a LONG WAY towards getting you to your transition point from negative to positive points.
 
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Sun Jun 26, 2011, 08:30 PM
(#4)
oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
BronzeStar
First hand, I don't really mind the call preflop. Not thrilled with it, but I don't mind it. Although you are out of position so you lose a lot of value there. Checking the flop is horrible though. Like really really bad. There are so many draws you can get value from, also weaker kings. And you have a strong but super vulnerable hand. Betting the turn isn't good as it looks like you're bluffing. Betting the river to fold is bad too. I'd just check-call at that point. Way too many likely hands beat your two pair. KQ, KJ, QQ, 44, clubs,

Second hand, A6 is trash but you're in the SB, okay see a flop. Then you check the flop? Don't check multiway pot flops when you hit. Pure bluffing is bad too, but checking? Check-calling is too passive and check-raising is turning your hand into a bluff. Getting 7 to 1 on the river I'm probably never folding top pair. I'll happily pay the price to see that he has quads or some missed flush draw, whatever.

Your 77 shove in a PSO is awful. You still have 15 BBs and there are no antes. The pot is not big enough to be worth risking your whole stack. It does not add 33%...it adds 10%, and the fat negative you're risking is not worth it here. Just fold preflop. Open limping on 15 BBs is not acceptable unless you're planning on a limp-shove, raising commits 15% of your stack or more and leaves you in an awkward spot postflop, and shoving is risking too much to win too little. I think 77 is a fold.

I think you should learn some standard TAG play. Be more aggressive. Bet when you have a hand, fold preflop when you have a hand that you should not be playing, etc. Don't slowplay vulnerable hands, especially out of position. You played pretty fishy in these hands you posted. Just try straightforward play. It usually works at this level.
 
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Sun Jun 26, 2011, 08:59 PM
(#5)
pokerstar671's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,206
Dude how could you fold that pair of aces? Dude you had him!
 
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Sun Jun 26, 2011, 09:20 PM
(#6)
!!!111Dan's Avatar
Since: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,290
1st hand...why are you checking two pair on the flop with a flush draw...and then betting when the flush draw hits? I don't like this play, and in the pso, you should be folding that pre-flop.
2nd hand...again..not a hand to play in the pso..but you did, and hit ...and then fold to a 100 bet on the river w/ 2 pair? The value alone should make you call that. I am putting the villain on a J.
3rd hand..like ori said..this is pso and you don't want to go out at this level no matter what...it does indeed look like you're tilting here. Small pocket pairs have to be played to set mine..but w/ your chip stack, I would have folded.
 
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Sun Jun 26, 2011, 09:52 PM
(#7)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,857
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
first hand... I'd have probably mucked it preflop. When you flop 2 pair, you absolutely have to bet it. Letting multiple people draw to beat you for free is a bad play.

2nd hand... another I'd probably have mucked preflop. When you hit top pair (yes you could easily be outkicked), but you must bet the flop to see where you're at in the hand. If you bet the flop, then if they had a 9, the won't see it hit the board, unless they have 2 pair.

3rd hand... bad push. Yes you want to raise, but pushing early in a PSO with a marginal hand (mid pair or big A) is a recipe for disaster. Don't push until you know you'll win the hand.
 
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Mon Jun 27, 2011, 05:32 PM
(#8)
PlsDntBlffMe's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 42
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Last edited by PlsDntBlffMe; Mon Apr 16, 2012 at 01:33 PM..
 

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