Home / Community / Forum / Poker Education / Poker Education & Beginners Questions /

Starting out playing NL Holdem

Old
Default
Starting out playing NL Holdem - Wed Jul 20, 2011, 09:48 PM
(#1)
JDubyaTas's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 13
Interested in the views regarding whether this is a good way to start out and learn and develop or is the cut throat nature of NL a bit dangerous early days? Or is it better to cut my teeth on low value SNG's?

I have been playing for a while but have really stopped learning and I am making silly 'gambling' mistakes at the moment hence the query.
 
Old
Default
Wed Jul 20, 2011, 09:52 PM
(#2)
hemetdennis's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,019
BronzeStar
NEVER MET A WINNING POKER PLAYER THAT HAS STOPPED LEARNING


 
Old
Default
Wed Jul 20, 2011, 09:54 PM
(#3)
!!!111Dan's Avatar
Since: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,290
Hey Jdubya..welcome to the forum.
What exactly are you referring to as opposed to sng's? Is it the skill league?

I would put a program together..reading, ask questions, watching videos, posting hand histories for analysis, ask questions, play within your bankroll management guidelines, ask questions, experiment with strategies in no risk games, and ask questions.

Lots of great people here who are more than helpful.
 
Old
Default
Wed Jul 20, 2011, 10:04 PM
(#4)
JDubyaTas's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 13
Thanks Dan, I have been playing NL Holdem and the odd Sit N Go to date and finding that with the NL ring game I am making the silly mistakes more often hence the comment regarding the fact that I feel that I have stopped learning or probably become lazy.

I only signed up a couple of days ago to this site and I think it is going to be a great resource (I should have done it earlier) for the learning you suggest especially the hand analysis although I would be embarressed to put up some of the hands I have played recently...

I also have a question re third party software that I will ask in a separate thread. I use Poker Tracker and was wondering how I should get the best out of it.

Thanks for the kind welcome and help.
 
Old
Default
Wed Jul 20, 2011, 10:14 PM
(#5)
!!!111Dan's Avatar
Since: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,290
Well personally, I'm partial to cash games. But that is definitely something you need to decide. What suits you best, and most importantly, what are you making money at.

For either, there are a lot of resources. xxflixx, who is one of the live trainers here, just did a couple videos on 6-max cash game play. I would check those out. (Along with any of the videos that look applicable to your learning)

But you want to do both imo. I hear a lot of educated players say that cash game players are better at adapting to mtt play than the other way around. So maybe start with cash. I just feel like you can control variance better by playing cash games.
Just my opinion.

Yeah...start a thread on the pt3 questions...not a pro with it.
 
Old
Default
Wed Jul 20, 2011, 11:29 PM
(#6)
rolo834's Avatar
Since: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,425
hey JD you and me both regarding embarrassed by hand historys but look at it this way (and im in exactly same boat as you)...the worse you are the easier it will be to initially improve

then you will have less leaks and eventully hopefully only a few

noone knows who you are so do not be embarrased and try to look at it this way in X weeks or months from now you will have improved and another newbie will have come along

I strongly recommend the training I only joined recently - I know I am going to embarrass myself when I post my hand historys for analysis do I care that a random perosn criticises my play ?...NO of course not as I know i play bad thats why i am here trying to improve

good luck 2u
 
Old
Default
Wed Jul 20, 2011, 11:56 PM
(#7)
JDubyaTas's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 13
Thatnks everybody for the feeback and support. Time to do some training...
 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com