Home / Community / Forum / Poker Education / Poker Education & Beginners Questions / Old Hand Analysis Section /

MP J10 suited push - late stages of $3 tourney

 
Old
Default
MP J10 suited push - late stages of $3 tourney - Mon Aug 29, 2011, 06:31 PM
(#1)
SnapperJohn1's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 40
Late stages of $3 NLHE tournament. Down to below 30 players and I had 7BB in chips. The table was fairly active, with the big stack to my right particularly active opening pots - in combination with no cards this made it difficult for me to do anything and slowly dragged my stack size down.

Given my stack size I was looking for a hand to go with PF. I Picked up J10 suited in middle position and when early positions folded I decided this was the one.

Question: do folks think this a reasonable play?
Also, when you are faced with active big stack to your right, is there anything you can do without getting lucky and picking up some cards??

Thanks in advance,

John


PokerStars No-Limit Hold'em, 3.3 Tournament, 1500/3000 Blinds 300 Ante (8 handed) - PokerStars Converter Tool from FlopTurnRiver.com

CO (t31582)
Button (t115514)
SB (t52033)
BB (t55644)
UTG (t59854)
UTG+1 (t172694)
MP1 (t206896)
Hero (MP2) (t21253)

Hero's M: 3.08

Preflop: Hero is MP2 with J, 10
3 folds, Hero bets t20953 (All-In), CO raises to t31282 (All-In), 2 folds, BB calls t28282

Flop: (t87417) 2, 6, K (3 players, 2 all-in)

Turn: (t87417) 6 (3 players, 2 all-in)

River: (t87417) 10 (3 players, 2 all-in)

Total pot: t87417
 
Old
Default
Mon Aug 29, 2011, 06:38 PM
(#2)
TrumpinJoe's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 4,557
With an M of about 3 an open-shove with JTs from MP is standard.
 
Old
Default
Mon Aug 29, 2011, 10:14 PM
(#3)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,788
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
with an M of 3, any pair, A, suited connector... all of them are a shove...... let alone a suited broadway connector. With that hand and that chip stack, I shove them so fast it makes their head spin.

I hope you won the hand, but either way, you made the correct play.
 
Old
Default
Mon Aug 29, 2011, 10:52 PM
(#4)
Da Sens Fan's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,118



 
Old
Default
Tue Aug 30, 2011, 03:13 AM
(#5)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
Yup. Standard first in vig jam for you.
 
Old
Default
Tue Aug 30, 2011, 03:47 AM
(#6)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnapperJohn1 View Post
Question: do folks think this a reasonable play?
Answered already...plenty good enough for a 1st in vigorish open shove by you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SnapperJohn1 View Post
Also, when you are faced with active big stack to your right, is there anything you can do without getting lucky and picking up some cards??
Not really enough info to determine what you mean by "active".

This can mean a wide variety of things, and your opponents will tend to be individuals, each with their own tendencies with regard to how they will act toward the things you do. Obviously, you may find different things work better agaisnt different types of players. One thing you should pretty much be doing all the time though, is trying to avoid getting THIS short in an MTT before you start looking for spots to pick up chips.

Waiting on big hands can be fine to do in the early stages of an MTT, when folding off your blinds is not going to cost you a large percentage. But the more your stack drops in comparison to the "active" stacks at your table, the less your FOLD EQUITY becomes versus those stacks.
Consider...

In this hand you have 7BB.

There is a BB and a half posted, plus 2/3rds of a blind in antes.

Even if an active player raises SMALL, say 2.3BB to go, that means when it gets to you there will be around 4.5BB in the pot.

If you then "stand" on 7BB, the open raiser will have to call just 4.7BB for a chance to win 11BB...2.34 to 1 odds.

(Note: if the raise is BIGGER, say 3BB to go, then his odds are GREATER to call.)

That means he'd have to feel he has a 29.9% chance to win the pot in order to make his call "correct".

A "bad" dominated hand like AQs v AKs has roughly a 28.7% chance to win; very NEAR the price you are alyign with a shove over a SMALL raise.

What real chance do you have to get folds when a villain could call when he is seriously dominated, and still get the quite right price?

So once you DO get this short, if you are facing an "active" big stack, you;ve pretty much stuck yourself to a certain level of card dependance (at least until you are SO SHORT you have no other choice but stand, or risk being blinded or even anted all in)...

The biggest way to avoid that awful situation is to start looking for chip up spots BEFORE you are so short any stand you might make over a raiser means he is almost certainly calling you.

Hope it helps.
 
Old
Default
Tue Aug 30, 2011, 02:20 PM
(#7)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,476
(Head Trainer)
Standard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JWK24 View Post
I hope you won the hand, but either way, you made the correct play.
I predict the villains had AQ and 44, are clueless, and lectured hero for shoving JT when he rivered them. lol
 
Old
Default
Tue Aug 30, 2011, 05:15 PM
(#8)
SnapperJohn1's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 40
Thanks for the replies.

JDean: I was looking for push spots earlier than the point I got to - from the point at which I got as low as 18BB. With the big stack action ahead of me I didnt feel as though pick up cards that I felt I could go with due to the action that was ahead of me. Note to self, to not get this short - must get chips in earlier and hope that fold equity will do the job.

TheLangolier: I am happy with the decision I made, I just didnt like the outcome! No happy ending on this occasion. As you say in training, keep making the right decisions and thats all you can do.


Thanks again for taking the time to comment.

John
 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com