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AK vs 2 opponents at MTT

 
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AK vs 2 opponents at MTT - Sun Sep 11, 2011, 07:59 AM
(#1)
Shadow11994's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 3
This was a freeroll MTT I played and there were about 1300 people left i think and i was getting short stacked and i thought i need to double up.
Here I had AKo at not very good possition but i decided to raise 4x the BB and got 2 callers.I was new to the table but I had played a few hands and it seemed the players were quite loose.
Usually i dont slow play ,but i got top set with top kicker and i checked to see what will happen.
They both go all-in and i called because there were no flush draws i could loose only to KQ at that moment and that wasnt much likely.One of them got straight on the river and i started thinking if i played well and could that have happend if I raised on the flop.
This is my first post so I expect feedback not only on the hand but on the post too.Thx.

 
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Sun Sep 11, 2011, 09:14 AM
(#2)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,809
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
you had over 20BB in chips, so you were not short-stacked, you had a medium stack.

Preflop, like the raise, but I'd have raised to 2.5BB or 3BB... whichever is your standard raise. You don't want to make a higher raise than normal, as it will help to conceal the strength of your hand.

Flop: instead of checking, I couldn't shove my chips into the middle fast enough!

You wanted to be all-in after that flop, be the one to shove first, instead of the person that has to call an all-in. You always want to be the one to shove first, not calling an all-in... as if you have to call one, all the pressure is on you, instead of your opponent.

If you did shove the flop, the opp that beat you probably drops and you double up thru the opp with the other king.
 
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Sun Sep 11, 2011, 09:32 AM
(#3)
Shadow11994's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 3
Thx very much for the fast reply.It helps a lot.
 
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Sun Sep 11, 2011, 12:06 PM
(#4)
oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
BronzeStar
Quote:
instead of checking, I couldn't shove my chips into the middle fast enough!
Eh, by shoving you don't give AJ, AT, JT, J9, T9, a chance to shove and think they have fold equity. How many hands can really call a shove? Yes if someone has Kx or AA they're coming along for the ride, as are some Qs. I think it's close, but I like checking here. It's so hard for someone to have a K and there is no real strong draw (gutshot with 2 overs or better). Although...it is a freeroll and people might be gambly enough to call with those straight draws anyway, so shoving isn't bad either.

Quote:
You always want to be the one to shove first, not calling an all-in... as if you have to call one, all the pressure is on you, instead of your opponent.
Not too much pressure to call when you basically have the nuts. No one ever has QQ here, so you're only worried about the 3 combos of KQ that beat you when our opponents are value-shoving tons of hands we crush (let alone bluffs and semibluffs). Even if we include slowplayed QQ, that's still only 6 combos that beat us amongst a range of hands that we are destroying. Still insta-call.

As it is you got it in as a huge favorite to have a stack of almost 24k, and had to fade just 7 outs (and a backdoor draw) between the two of them. And that's worth WAYYYYYYY more than your "tournament life" vs. a gutshot, haha. You're about a 70% favorite to triple up (EV about 2.1) and that's way better than an 85% chance to double up (EV about 1.7).
 
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Sun Sep 11, 2011, 02:01 PM
(#5)
Shadow11994's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 3
Thanks.I appreciate your comment a lot.
So you mean after all that was the right play.
 
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Sun Sep 11, 2011, 10:55 PM
(#6)
oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
BronzeStar
Sometimes. I think you should check some of the time and shove some of the time. Against more aggressive players I like checking more, against less aggressive players I like shoving more. And against good players I think you need to balance between checking and shoving the nuts. I think maybe checking 70% of the time against an aggressive player and shoving 70% against a passive player would be a good balance.
 
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Mon Sep 12, 2011, 01:45 PM
(#7)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,496
(Head Trainer)
I mostly agree with oriholic here, shoving the flop with the effective nuts value cuts ourselves way too much as it's really hard to get called by weak hands and it gives no one a chance to bluff off chips to us. Checking to induce is ok (also agree on the no pressure part, we're checking and praying someone shoves, not fearing it), another line I might take is a token value bet, something really small like 1/4 - 1/3rd of the pot... it may look weak, like we're just following through but leaving ourselves room to fold if we get shoved on, and it gets some money going into the pot vs. hands that might check and take free cards but still want to see the next street. Also (and this "also" doesn't really apply to a freeroll where no one is likely paying attention), vs. better players I'd like to be able to make smaller c-bet stabs and pick up some of those pots with air, so having a big hand in this spot with a small c-bet helps to balance that and doesn't allow better players to declare open season on your bargain c-bet steals.
 

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