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Like this hand - Fri Sep 16, 2011, 08:59 AM
(#1)
pavelfur's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 10
Very like the way I played this hand on the river.
The guy was a TAG and I had a TAG image too.
He steals a lot so I decided to 3bet him with a bluff.
Well he called me so it seems he had a hand. He checked and I had open straight draw so I decided to semibluff the guy in case he has a pair less than KK and not a set it will be hard for him to call. He called so I deduced he has probably AK/AA/KK . He checked again and I knew that fire another bullet here is not good at all because a blank card came up and he's going to call me at least, so I checked too.
The river was magical for me, I was thinking how am I going to max my value because I was 100% sure I'm ahead.
My decision was to go all in because for him it seems very likely like a bluff hand. (It's probably either nuts or a bluff hand and according to my range from the Tag's view I cannot have the nuts here). And he indeed made his call with AK

Note: Maybe my bet on the flop was too big. I can accept that, but overall I think I did the right play postflop.

 
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Fri Sep 16, 2011, 10:25 AM
(#2)
RockerguyAA's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,089
BronzeStar
I like the preflop raise, just make sure it is not your normal play. It should be done only occasionally with non-premium hands to balance your range and also help keep him under control.

On the flop the semi-bluff c-bet is a great move. However, I would bet less. If villain doesn't have a K he is probably going to fold to a 40% pot bet for 100% pot bet equally as likely. In the event he doesn't fold, you do want to be building the pot so if you hit your straight you can play for stacks by river. I think you could have bet smaller on the flop and then bet the turn as well. You want to keep the pressure on him if he has a hand like 88-QQ and you want to try and set your own price. If your the one betting you can give yourself good pot odds to draw.

I think your read of the opponent is really off here. Unless you have seen the TAG villain simply call a preflop raise with AA or KK, you can infer that he does not have those hands here. He would have reraised you preflop. If he has been stealing a lot than his cutoff range is much wider than AA/KK/AK. I'd put him on more like 22+, KQs(no KK)+, ATs+(no AA) after seeing him call your preflop raise.

The way post flop played out villain could have been slow playing a flopped set, calling down with a medium pocket pair hoping it is best, or calling you down with KQ. Against another TAG(you), I am shocked villain would play his top pair top kicker so passively. Really bad play on his part. If you were a maniac or a LAG, his play would make a lot of sense...

This hand is a good example of concealing hand strength. Your preflop re-raise shifted your range much narrower in the eyes of your opponent (since your viewed as a TAG). 65s was way outside of your range in his view. I think he called you on the river because there were no hands in your range that beat him on that board other than a very unlikely KK/AA. That may also be why he slowplayed to the river, but he should have serisouly reconsidered things when you bet the river.
 
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Fri Sep 16, 2011, 02:39 PM
(#3)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,517
(Head Trainer)
I think you played it well. Good check-back on the turn, and I like the large value bet in this spot too.
 
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Fri Sep 16, 2011, 02:44 PM
(#4)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,517
(Head Trainer)
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockerguyAA View Post
Against another TAG(you), I am shocked villain would play his top pair top kicker so passively. Really bad play on his part. If you were a maniac or a LAG, his play would make a lot of sense...
I like villains flop and turn play with AK. Vs. our perceived range, he's in a classic way ahead/way behind scenario. If he gets aggressive with top/top vs. our perceived range, he should expect to fold out all the hands he's beating, and get action from the hands that tie or beat him, which makes getting aggressive really bad on his part.

The only thing I don't like is the villains river call. Big river bets are usually for value with strong hands unless you've seen someone bluff like this before. If we're playing TAG he probably hasn't seen us get a river overbet bluff snapped off if we've even made any, so this bet is likely for value and AK really isn't beating anything in our value range, so it's a sigh/fold imo without reads on us.
 
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Sat Sep 17, 2011, 10:36 AM
(#5)
RockerguyAA's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,089
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLangolier View Post
I like villains flop and turn play with AK. Vs. our perceived range, he's in a classic way ahead/way behind scenario. If he gets aggressive with top/top vs. our perceived range, he should expect to fold out all the hands he's beating, and get action from the hands that tie or beat him, which makes getting aggressive really bad on his part.
Yeah your right. I think I may have been a little too results oriented on this hand

If villain were to raise the flop to see if he is behind to KK or AA, villain risks getting pushed off his hand when up against another AK. Also, agree with you that there isn't really anything in pavefur's perceived range that's worse than top pair and would call a flop or turn raise. KQ maybe, but not super likely if pavelfur is a TAG.

The pot on the river was only $3.19 so villain certainly could have called down a 50% pot value bet or bluff. That plan goes out the window though when pavelfur goes for max value with his straight on the river. Left villain with a polarizing and costly decision.
 

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