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How do I maintain a positive attitude?

 
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How do I maintain a positive attitude? - Tue Oct 11, 2011, 02:47 PM
(#1)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
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I'm playing 6 25 cent 90 man sit and gos and I get eliminated from three like this. The tens were against a maniac who was going all in every hand if you are wondering. How do I play the other three to the best of my ability after this? Is there a way to avoid tilting? I'm running pretty bad over the last week so the tens hand had me in a very bad mood.The queens didn't bother me so much because I probably would have called with the jacks.
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 02:48 PM
(#2)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
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This isn't a bad beat thread, I really would like to know the secret to avoiding tilt.
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 03:37 PM
(#3)
roomik17's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
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when you start to get tilty, close the game and leave
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 03:39 PM
(#4)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
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That may work fine for cash games, but in a sit and go I'm not going to do that.
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 03:50 PM
(#5)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,832
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first hand: since only 2nd level of a tourney, the one thing I'd have done differently is to make my initial raise more (I normally raise to 150-200 as a std raise... to try and discourage a multi-way pot). When the opp 3-bets, it's an auto-shove for me. I'd put the opp on my friend list and try to get them at my table, as they had no right at all raising a 5-way pot with 89s.

2nd hand: 10's with a 28BB stack to a push gets mucked immediately to a shove, especially if it's a league game (which this isn't). They shoved with garbage trying to steal, but 10's preflop with that stack does not really have enough of a reward to warrant calling. With 10's, you want to get into the pot cheap and see if you can hit a set... because any player with a clue will have at least 2 over cards to them, making it a race situation. You're already in the top 3 at the table and you want to preserve your chip stack and add to them when you know you're a good sized favorite to win the hand, which you cannot do with 10's to a push.
If you had a 10BB or less stack, then it's an automatic call, but that's too many chips to be risking at that point in a tourney with a marginal hand.

3rd hand: With 14BB, the shove isn't a bad play, but with QQ, I'd have made a std raise and saw the flop. Even if you made a std raise and didn't like the flop (pair, A or K) then you will still have an 11BB's, which is still a playable stack... if you had to fold them.

The way to avoid tilting is patience and to not be hot-headed.... it's the only way.
Also, the way to beat a maniac like the opp in the 2nd hand... fold until you get a premium hand (cat 1 hand), then let them double you. If you try to go with less, you're taking a big risk.
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 04:03 PM
(#6)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
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I will try raising more at the early levels, it seems like a good idea. I am willing to admit that I could have folded the tens, cashed and been happy. I now see why it is a good play, but this guy was shoving every hand... the next hand I had ace queen, he would have shoved again (had I folded the previous hand) and I would have to fold again. I understand that this also is the right play, but do I need to wait for aces or kings to stand up to this maniac?
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 04:16 PM
(#7)
PaidInFull6's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by roomik17 View Post
when you start to get tilty, close the game and leave
+1 Take a break, walk it off for how ever long it takes you to get back in the right frame of mind.
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 04:21 PM
(#8)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaidInFull6 View Post
+1 Take a break, walk it off for how ever long it takes you to get back in the right frame of mind.
Like I said the first time, if you take a break in one of these tournaments you are abandoning your buy-in which is worse than playing on tilt. When you come back from your break you will have blinded off or you will have one or two big blinds (accounting for blind increases).
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 04:30 PM
(#9)
PaidInFull6's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 342
Get dealt AA and double up, that helps my tilt. This song also seems to calm me down.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlLCXiG4eD4
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 07:34 PM
(#10)
AAsKKin4abet's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 3
Hi mate,
i think what they meant by a break is actually logging off altogether.........close your browser, shut down completely!.......watch some porn, get on You tube, go walk ur dogs, screw your mrs......etc......get outta the room !!! lol....gl, we all go through it..
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 07:59 PM
(#11)
TrumpinJoe's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 4,557
How to avoid tilt.

DON'T BE RESULTS ORIENTED!

At the poker table you control your decisions and your decisions only. Sometimes you can influence other players but that is all. Poker is not about who wins the most pots or gets the best hands. It about who makes the best decision. At the end of every hand you should review your decision making process in light of the new information. If your reads were off, adjust. If your opponent is showing a new trait adapt. If it played out close to how you expected you just confirmed your reads.

Thinking of poker in this light will minimize tilt because you will find you either made a good decision or not (or sometimes its too close to call). If you made a poor decision you were just presented with a learning opportunity. If you made a good decision it was just confirmed. Both of these are favorable outcomes no matter how the hand played out.
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 08:19 PM
(#12)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
SilverStar
I am a new player so I don't have a long view of things yet. After putting in some significant time at the tables I think I'll be able to laugh these things off. Thanks for the advice.
 
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Tue Oct 11, 2011, 08:27 PM
(#13)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,832
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrumpinJoe View Post
How to avoid tilt.

DON'T BE RESULTS ORIENTED!

At the poker table you control your decisions and your decisions only. Sometimes you can influence other players but that is all. Poker is not about who wins the most pots or gets the best hands. It about who makes the best decision. At the end of every hand you should review your decision making process in light of the new information. If your reads were off, adjust. If your opponent is showing a new trait adapt. If it played out close to how you expected you just confirmed your reads.

Thinking of poker in this light will minimize tilt because you will find you either made a good decision or not (or sometimes its too close to call). If you made a poor decision you were just presented with a learning opportunity. If you made a good decision it was just confirmed. Both of these are favorable outcomes no matter how the hand played out.
Very well said TJ!
 

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