Home / Community / Forum / Poker Education / Poker Education & Beginners Questions / Old Hand Analysis Section /

Sometimes I want to slap myself

 
Old
Default
Sometimes I want to slap myself - Tue Oct 11, 2011, 07:52 PM
(#1)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
SilverStar


This hand happens with twelve remaining in a 25 cent 90 man turbo. This moron puts in eight percent of his stack with deuces and gets lucky to hit a set. The other moron in the hand (that would be me) has played this tournament quite well making very few mistakes until he donks most of his stack. Can I get away from this? No, apparently. Should I?

I'm not this bad all of the time. I didn't get my chips by getting it in and getting lucky. I was playing 12/11. I'm doing quite well in the 90 mans. This is my leak, I can't seem to get away from big hands even though it means going from a big stack to a micro stack. When will I learn?
 
Old
Default
Tue Oct 11, 2011, 07:58 PM
(#2)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
SilverStar
Sorry about the rant, it is just really painful to play well for two hours and then donk off all of your chips when the big payoff is so near. I keep running into this problem and I can't seem to fix it. I am going to have to take 19honu62's advice and take my hand off of the mouse.
 
Old
Default
Tue Oct 11, 2011, 08:32 PM
(#3)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,831
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
Here's a piece of advice I got before playing my first live tourney.....

It's not about knowing when to play a hand... it's to know when to fold one. If you ever want to win a tourney, that's the key thing that you'll have to learn.

the more and more tournies that I play, the more and more that I see it to be 100% true.

The way that the opp played the 22 in this is EXACTLY what you really want to do with a low pair (although a couple more people in the pot helps).... hopefully be in late position so you don't get raised, see the flop as cheap as possible, then fold of you miss or get max value out of a set.
 
Old
Default
Tue Oct 11, 2011, 08:46 PM
(#4)
hamburglarid's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 131
SilverStar
You've evaluated a few of my hands now so you can see that it seems to be the same mistake over and over. These 90 mans are good for me because you end up playing a push fold game when you get on the short stack and I'm good at that. My problems begin when I have a decent stack and am forced to play post flop where I'm terrible.

I shouldn't really say anything bad about the other player. I don't know what he was thinking. To risk 1000 chips knowing you could have the biggest stack in the tournament if things went perfectly is tempting.

I find this whole thing funny right now. It is my competitive nature that makes me get so angry at myself, but that is what also makes me want to improve.

This mistake was so huge that I think it will help me in the long run.
 
Old
Default
Tue Oct 11, 2011, 09:15 PM
(#5)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,831
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
Based on that last reply. You need to start playing tournies that can teach you to play postflop. A push/fold game will almost always get you into the -ROI column, normally a pretty large -ROI.

Being able to outplay an opponent after the flop is not only where you'll win the majority of big pots, but is mandatory to make consistant deep runs in tournies (also mandatory to set up any bluffs).

The other thing you can do... is that if you get on a short-stack, try to learn how to nurse the short-stack along and survive... without pushing. If you do that, then you can get ITM in some situations that you'd normally be out of the $$$. Remember, goal # 1 is to get ITM, goal # 2 is to win the tourney... and you can't win if you don't get ITM.
 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com