Home / Community / Forum / Poker Education / Poker Education & Beginners Questions / Old Hand Analysis Section /

6Max NLHE AK off-suit in 3-way pot

 
Old
Default
6Max NLHE AK off-suit in 3-way pot - Tue Nov 15, 2011, 01:44 PM
(#1)
EdinFreeMan's Avatar
Since: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,540
About 10 hands in at this table so very little info on opponents. I'm not sure I played this well pre/post flop - so I am unsure where I am after both opponents put money in on the turn card.

Should I have played stronger preflop and/or c-bet (donk bet) the flop? Do I call or fold on the turn?



Ed from Edinburgh - EdinFreeMan

Last edited by EdinFreeMan; Tue Nov 15, 2011 at 01:50 PM..
 
Old
Default
Tue Nov 15, 2011, 02:03 PM
(#2)
oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
BronzeStar
Depending on reads, 4-bet pre. Get back the betting lead and set up a better PSR. What's this guy's 3-betting range like and is he more likely to jam/fold or call to a 4 bet?

Button can't donk the flop. It's not possible. Can go either way but I'm probably betting the flop when checked to. Not too worried about being check/raised off AK. Although if you think a check/raise is imminent, then checking it back to hit a free A or K on the turn can be good too.
 
Old
Default
Tue Nov 15, 2011, 03:37 PM
(#3)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,817
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
If it were me, I'd have just called their re-raise before the flop, just as you did. Although, I would have bet the flop, when it gets checked to me. The opp probably has AK, AQ or small pair that missed. If you bet the flop, then an opp could easily think you hit a part of the board and get off of AQ or AK, especially since you were the initial raiser preflop.
By you not betting the flop, if I were the opp, I'd lead out on the turn too... thinking I had the best hand (even though you may be ahead of them).
Calling their turn bet's probably a bad idea, as they could easily be ahead of you.... it's better to take the initiative and make the opp react to a bet on the flop, than to have the pressure on you on the turn. If you get check/raised on the flop, then the decision for you is easy.
 
Old
Default
Tue Nov 15, 2011, 06:15 PM
(#4)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
As played, I think I lean toward folding the turn.

You've kept the pot small in comparison to the very deep stacks in play (201.5BB effective).
Yes, you have "power" in your stack, and that power MIGHT be expressed with a bluff shot, but a decent part of he time this play pattern can be a set by the SB.
Plus, the fact the BB called the turn lead by the SB means he too has some "interest" in this pot.

All in all, you have no real expectation that hitting a 1 pair hand is going to be good enough for you to win (if you bluff and get called), and the depth of money here means you'd have to probably try an over-bet (on the order of making it 65c to 75c to go) to have any solid chance of getting both to muck.

A bet that size is pretty risky for you, since you could easily be 3bet off of it by either stack, and if you cannot be sure you have any live outs if you get called, it just isn't worth it for this small pot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oriholic View Post
Depending on reads, 4-bet pre. Get back the betting lead and set up a better PSR. What's this guy's 3-betting range like and is he more likely to jam/fold or call to a 4 bet?
I do agree with this totally, this is definately an option.
In the right spot, versus the right player(s), a 4bet that builds the pot gives you more leverage to C-Bet with the lead, and possibly take this one down without contest.
There is nothing wrong with the way you played it though, as long as you recognize the post flop considerations simply flatitng the 3bet gives.

If you are going to play more aggressively post flop, then a 4bet pre is probably better.
But since you were willing to check behind on your flop miss, a "fit or fold" line after you had been 3bet is fine on this depth of money too.
...that is as long as you do not try to get off that fit or fold "horse" mid-stream by trying to bluff on a story that would have a tough time holding together.
 
Old
Default
Tue Nov 15, 2011, 06:33 PM
(#5)
EdinFreeMan's Avatar
Since: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,540
Thanks for your input.

I think being new to the table I was planning to keep it pretty tight and not raise pots too much in case there were wild players at the table. I was happy to fold with a minimal loss on the turn, having to put each player on some sort of a made hand, either a pocket pair or having hit part of the board.

Here's how it turned out.

I did go on to make a small profit over a 200 hand session.




Ed from Edinburgh - EdinFreeMan
 
Old
Default
Tue Nov 15, 2011, 06:34 PM
(#6)
EdinFreeMan's Avatar
Since: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,540
duplicated

Last edited by EdinFreeMan; Tue Nov 15, 2011 at 06:40 PM.. Reason: duplicated
 
Old
Default
Tue Nov 15, 2011, 06:36 PM
(#7)
EdinFreeMan's Avatar
Since: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,540
wierd - triplicated

Last edited by EdinFreeMan; Tue Nov 15, 2011 at 06:41 PM.. Reason: duplicate
 
Old
Default
Tue Nov 15, 2011, 06:46 PM
(#8)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdinFreeMan View Post
Thanks for your input.

I think being new to the table I was planning to keep it pretty tight and not raise pots too much in case there were wild players at the table. I was happy to fold with a minimal loss on the turn, having to put each player on some sort of a made hand, either a pocket pair or having hit part of the board.

Here's how it turned out.

I did go on to make a small profit over a 200 hand session.




Ed from Edinburgh - EdinFreeMan
Then I think you played this very VERY well...

You used aggression to try giving yourself a chance to win, but did not go over board because you realized you lacked info. Obviously, you have no clue to really act on that you;d have gotten a price to draw at what was 2 live overs...so even if you HAD put more in to keep going, that still does not guarentee you get to that A on the river.

You lost the min, and sometimes that is as good as it gets.

Gotta remember: money not LOST spends the same at the end of the day as money won.

Good job.

Last edited by JDean; Tue Nov 15, 2011 at 07:09 PM..
 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com