Home / Community / Forum / Poker Community / Brags, Beats and Variance /

Demotivational...

Old
Default
Demotivational... - Sat Nov 26, 2011, 07:15 AM
(#1)
XxTiberxX's Avatar
Since: Sep 2011
Posts: 374
First all-in cash game after the reprogramming of my mind. This is very demotivational.

 
Old
Default
Sat Nov 26, 2011, 07:20 AM
(#2)
spike8998's Avatar
Since: Apr 2010
Posts: 853
Tiber
Don't be dis-heartened
You got him to go all in when he was behind
He hit 1 of his 3 outers on the river
It happens
Keep going bud
You will win in the long run
 
Old
Default
Sat Nov 26, 2011, 09:29 AM
(#3)
Moxie Pip's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,853
You played the hand perfectly. Pre-flop line is excellent--punish the limpers. 3x + a bet for each limper so fine there. Post flop you lead out for 2/3's of the pot,no complaints there and then you get him to play for stacks and have him dominated, This is EXACTLY what you want,keep doing this over and over and you'll be fine.

The things you can take from this hand that will profit you is to make a note on this guy that he will over-value AJo. That's exploitable. Also did he stay on the table or up and leave? If he bounced it could be a conservative BR protection play by him--double up and then get off to bank the winnings. OR he could be a short stacker,though 40BB is a high number to do that with really. if it's the latter that's something you need to be mindful of. So make a note of that if he left after the hand--that he sat with 40BB and got it all-in first hand and bounced. Next time you see him if he sits short and goes for stacks early then make sure you make a note of that and the range that he's willing to do it with if he moves wider than the AJo.
 
Old
Default
Sat Nov 26, 2011, 12:04 PM
(#4)
XxTiberxX's Avatar
Since: Sep 2011
Posts: 374
his first hand when he joined the table, minimum buy-in and off course left after.
 
Old
Default
Sat Nov 26, 2011, 03:48 PM
(#5)
TrustySam's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 8,291
BronzeStar
Those cash games look pretty harmless, eh, in that the cost to enter a pot is oftentimes just a couple of pennies? But I've kind of found out the hard way that they can get pretty costly pretty fast, like it did with this hand. I guess there's a lot of variance, especially when it's not uncommon to have three pre-flop limpers (making it more likely that somebody who calls might have any assortment of hands ... AJ, or even possibly AT or AK, also 44 or possibly TT) and then that one caller is intent on jacking up the pot.

I had a hand the other day at a heads-up game, that on it's face just looks like a runner-runner bad beat:



You might wonder why I called the shove since the opponent could so easily have had a 3. But I called because this was my second or third game with them, and they play like this:



They won the first game by hitting a two-outer 99>QQ, and so I agreed to a rematch because it seemed like it'd be an easy win if they're so willing to put chips into the middle with crap (although the 99 was an actual hand). Which sounds reasonable ... except that I have this very specific strategy of wanting to play small-ball to get my stack to 4x the other person's before I go all-in, as a way to avoid getting burned by variance ... so why on earth was I accepting a rematch against a maniac if I wasn't able to play according to my plan??

I guess what I'm trying to point out is that if you just dismiss every hand as a bad beat, sometimes you can miss stuff that can help you. Like from my bad beat, I took away from it that:

1) I was on tilt ... to get so derailed off my gameplan such that I'd accept a rematch against somebody who had a different one from mine ... and I missed the signs (again ... sign ... ),

2) By showing a willingness to fold with less than the nuts, I kind of opened the door to this player continuing to shove into me with crap, and

3) Waiting for a hand, and then calling their shove wasn't necessarily the only way to play against this person ... I guess I could have waited from them to check when the were out of position, and then I could have used their tactic of shoving with crap to try and grap the chips with my A high or whatever ... it probably would have been good

Anyways, this isn't supposed to be about me Just wanted to show you some additional steps that sometimes you can do after a game ... like maybe the take-away from this is that you're playing a lot of high-variance games (cash games and 45-person MTT's). And variance can be hard ... are there other options to those two types of games?

Last edited by TrustySam; Sat Nov 26, 2011 at 03:58 PM..
 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com