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HU - Pressuring your weaker opponents

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HU - Pressuring your weaker opponents - Fri Dec 09, 2011, 04:52 PM
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king_spadez1's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 230
Unlike my last HU post (Card Dead vs Maniac), where I was up against a ‘MANIAC’, here I was up against a weak loose player. I call this session, ‘Pressuring Mr. Light’.

By HU play I had seen 102 hands. He played what I call, loose/conservative. He got involved in many cheap PF’s, tried an occasional min stab (in and out of position), but mostly folded to any raise or further action. He only made min PFR’s at all levels. He always showed down a strong hand when he bet big.

Villain’s stats: VPIP 38, PFR 6, Cbet 100%

My plan going in to HU play:
Raise most of my Dealer/BTN’s until he showed resistance. I don’t think raising all is a good way of playing; he may get tired of my aggression and change his style of play. I don’t want him to change! Fold to any big bets, and reraises, unless I have the ‘goods’.

I was a little more aggressive than I usually am, because of some real good advice from JWK24 – go Bears!). The advice was, ‘You basically want to raise/fold every hand when down to HU’.

The following are the 23 hands we played:

 
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Fri Dec 09, 2011, 05:08 PM
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Stats before HU really won't play into your thinking as much as they would with a full table. You're going to be in a lot more hands HU, so the numbers will be skewed higher.

Hand 1: raising to 6k is a bit much. Normally when you want to raise HU, try to use 3BB as your std raise.

Same for most of these hands. Use 3BB as your initial raise, then go from there if the opp wants to play the hand or re-raise. When you have a hand with potential or you think may be ahead of the opp, you WANT action, so, instead of overbetting and have them fold, raise to 3BB and hopefully they'll pay the extra and see the flop. Then you can try to outplay the opp.

Also, from the button, try to not play every hand, but only ones that have some post-flop play (Ax, Kx, pairs, broadway cards, connectors, suited 1-gap, etc).

Hand 12: like the c-bet on the flop when the opp checked.

Limping from the button (SB) won't do much other than get you into trouble HU.

Hand 14: I'd muck that preflop, 10 2 is Doyle's lucky hand, but not mine.

hand 18: I'd have made the value bet on the flop or turn (one or the other, probably the turn), not the river. When you wait until the river, it looks like a missed flush.
 
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Fri Dec 09, 2011, 05:14 PM
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You overbet some, but very glad to see you not limping from the button (SB). That lets the opp see too many flops for free, which can get us into nothing but trouble. You want to make the opp pay to see the flop.
 
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Fri Dec 09, 2011, 06:07 PM
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Since: Sep 2010
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Your regard for the value of your own hand seems inconsistent. For example, you checked back 43o in one hand, but raised over the villain's limp with 54o in another. I can't really see any pattern to the size of your raise over the villain's limp, but it does vaguely seem that you are betting bigger with better hands, so I suggest that you decide on a pattern for your bet sizing and stick to it for all of your hand strengths.

I like how you are taking advantage of the villain's timidity by shoving over his limps. I also like how you are never calling off your chips with mediocre hands; it's good to see that you understand that the first one to make the all-in move is the one who has the advantage.
 
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Fri Dec 09, 2011, 10:03 PM
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king_spadez1's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWK24 View Post

Hand 1: raising to 6k is a bit much. Normally when you want to raise HU, try to use 3BB as your std raise.

Same for most of these hands. Use 3BB as your initial raise, then go from there if the opp wants to play the hand or re-raise. When you have a hand with potential or you think may be ahead of the opp, you WANT action, so, instead of overbetting and have them fold, raise to 3BB and hopefully they'll pay the extra and see the flop. Then you can try to outplay the opp.
Thanks again for critiquing my play. I see I have a lot to learn.

Here’s what I was thinking:
There are 34BB (total) in play. With my opponent sitting on 8-12BB I'm going to put him AI with the top 10% hands (plus some Ax hands added), if he doesn’t come in for a raise in the Dealer/BTN; the same is true if I’m sitting in the Dealer/BTN. I want to reduce his stack 1BB at a time if possible, this gives him a less damaging stack if we get it AI in a future hand. With this opponent and the blinds being so high, I felt that 2BB was all I needed to raise to be an effective bet. Because I was using a 2BB raise it allowed me to widen my raising range, and also kept me in a position where I didn’t get priced in on a reraise. During the middle of the session, after he doubled up, we were both around 17BB’s. At this point, the hands I would have shoved early on, I now only raised 2X PF (ie.. hand 1 (A5o) - vs - hand 8 (A9o)). Toward the end of the session, as his stack (7BB) dwindled down and the blinds went to 300/600, I didn’t want him to see too many hands, I opened up my range even wider and shoved T9o over his open/limp


@PanickyPoker – Thanks for taking your time to check this out – I appreciate it.
Yes, I set my betting to my hand strength for my early AI’s, I was trying to reduce his stack with my good hands that wanted folds, but were strong enough for calls. He was short stacked and I wanted to get him shorter, before he caught a hand to double-up with.

I was looking for a hand NOT to reraise his open limp, didn’t want him to change his style because of my aggression. The 43o seemed like a good candidate. The following hand (54o), I went back to my aggression just because it had been working for me.
 
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Fri Dec 09, 2011, 10:35 PM
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PanickyPoker's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 3,168
That's an interesting thought process. It makes a lot of sense, but what would you have done if you had been reshipped over? How often would you have open/folded with under 15 effective big blinds?

Last edited by PanickyPoker; Fri Dec 09, 2011 at 10:41 PM..
 
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My reasoning behind hand 23 - Sat Dec 10, 2011, 06:03 PM
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king_spadez1's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by PanickyPoker View Post
That's an interesting thought process. It makes a lot of sense, but what would you have done if you had been reshipped over? How often would you have open/folded with under 15 effective big blinds?
I’m not quite sure what you’re asking, and not familiar with the term reship.

I received a message sent to my email with an update to this post, but I don’t see the update posted. I’m going to post and answer it below.

__________________________________________________ ______________________

I'm curious what your thoughts are on the last hand. The villain didn't limp in that hand, but you picked an interesting hand to reship there.
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The villain limped, so, I’ll answer what I would have done in either case.

A
Hand 23 - The villain limped, but if he had made any aggressive action, with a 6BB stack (my stack being 14BB), I would have folded. My reaction would be ‘read dependent’ against any opponent. This one I would have folded
------------------------------
B
Hand 23 - The villain limped: Villain’s stack 6BB – My stack 14BB – Pot 2BB
We were both so short, and given the villain’s history, and my hand strength, I didn’t want to let him see the flop for free. I’m thinking that if the villain had two over cards to my hand or a premium pair, he would have shoved (unless he’s trapping me, which he’s never done). Therefore he most likely has Kx, Qx, maybe Ax (but he might shove that at this point of the game), or a small to medium PP (which he might shove as well). With those holdings my hand is valued at 40-51% equity (J8s – 22). I used poker stove for these ranges, but I knew just about what the hand was worth during the game, through study. Hopefully he doesn’t have me dominated, which would be a smaller % of his range, with fewer combos because of my holdings (blockers).

This paragraph can be skipped to get to the reason I shoved.
The way I figure the EV for the hand may be a little different than others, but math can be done a lot of different ways to get to the same answer. Maybe after reading this others may change their way of calculating the EV ‘on the fly’, in AI situations.
There are 2BB in the pot, the short stack has 6BB – Chips needed for AI / Total Pot (6BB / 14BB = 43%). My way is easier, VERY LITTLE MATH (just remember a simple chart).
Take the ratio of the Dead Money (what’s in the pot now) 2BB, and the money needed for the AI call 6BB = 1/3. With that info, use the chart below (% rounded off):
¼ = 45% (you need 45% equity to call an AI shove to make it 0EV)
½ = 40% (you need 40% equity to call an AI shove to make it 0EV)
¾ = 36% (you need 36% equity to call an AI shove to make it 0EV)
1 = 33% (you need 33% equity to call an AI shove to make it 0EV)
Being that 1/3 falls between ¼ and ½, you need around 43% equity to make this a 0EV call.

After his limp, and the shortness of our stacks, I’m more than willing to shove. If I win, the tourney’s over, if I lose, I will be down but not out. I have the 43% equity needed for 0EV, and the BIG PLUS is that I have fold equity against this opponent, that makes this a +EV play all the way.
.
 

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