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44 on a scary board

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44 on a scary board - Mon Dec 12, 2011, 10:11 PM
(#1)
cletero's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 54
Hi, just wanted to hear your opinion on how I played this hand, I was just starting today and had to make a quick decision, I don't regret what I did, but I had already dobled up in another table, so maybe I should have called the flop raises, since they weren't that big and had great implied odds. But again, chances of this happening are low too!
Thanks!!

 
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Mon Dec 12, 2011, 10:24 PM
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JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,862
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preflop, it's fine to limp with this. You've got a hand that is probably not ahead, but if you flop a set, you could possibly win a large pot.

On the flop, with that many in the pot, someone hit at least a part of the board, if not a straight already. Assuming that nobody hits a straight and only has a pair... and that they will never hit a straight (which is not good, because another broadway card will most likely give someone a striaght... and possibly a full house), you only have 2 outs in the hand. You also could lose with your 2 outs if someone hits the flush draw that the flop gives.

With 2 outs, you have 8% equity at the flop. Even to call their min bet, you have to put 10% of the pot into it. 10% is greater than your equity, so you should fold on the flop to the 2 cent bet.

Even if you called the 2 cents, you would have to put 8 more into a pot of 41 cents (about 20%), which makes it an even larger fold.

The best thing to do here is to call pre and fold to the 2 cent bet on the flop.

I'd discount much of the implied odds in this hand, because even if you hit a set, you don't know you have the best hand with a possible straight on the flop, let alone the flush draw.
 
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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 07:38 PM
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oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
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Well, you definitely made some mistakes here.

Preflop there's almost no value to posting blind. You should generally wait until the BB. While waiting for the BB to post, pay attention to the dynamics of the table. Notice who's limping every hand, calling all the way down with a small pair or ace high, etc. Most of the time you're not going to be dealt a good or even playable hand, and most of the time you're just burning money by posting the blind.

This flop is horrible for 44. Not scary, but terrible. Easy check/fold. Your hand has zero value here. Even against a straight or flush draw you're not doing well. And if any of those guys has a pair or better you're drawing near dead.
 
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thanks - Tue Dec 13, 2011, 10:31 PM
(#4)
cletero's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 54
Thank you guys, I actually missed on the easy possibility of someone making a straight, so it was a good quick decision, I called the 2 cent raises on the flop because of the read I had on this guys, but when the late positions raised, I figured they had at least top pair and it was time to say goodbye. I was just not fully into the game yet and thought maybe there was something I missed. Nice on the equity calculations, it's something I'm trying to work on because they explain everything so well, but still have trouble calculating outs during play.
Thanks for your comments and I will keep on learning.
 
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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 10:40 PM
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Grade b's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,607
I have a quick question.

What would you consider to be a good flop with 44?

Other than a 4

Grade b


I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught. ~Winston Churchill

13 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 10:56 PM
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JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grade b View Post
i have a quick question.

What would you consider to be a good flop with 44?

Other than a 4

grade b
a23, 235, 356, 567
 
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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 11:03 PM
(#7)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cletero View Post
Nice on the equity calculations, it's something I'm trying to work on because they explain everything so well, but still have trouble calculating outs during play.
Download pokerstove from www.pokerstove.com

then go to the video section and watch the video from Dave on how to use it either from the video section or from this link.
http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/art...-to-PokerStove

This will help you learn about the equity numbers.

Also, if you know the number of outs, a rough estimate is 4% per out on the flop OR 2% per out from the turn.
Getting used to figuring out the number of outs will be something that you will have to learn and practice. You are only going to learn it from doing it over and over and over.

A good thing you can do here is to take your hand histories and go thru a the hands in them as a review and for the hands that you're in look at what cards you have that you can hit to better your hand and be ahead of what the opponent could possibly or does (if they show their cards) have.
 

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