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Attacking the LAG

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Attacking the LAG - Tue Dec 13, 2011, 01:41 AM
(#1)
king_spadez1's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 230
I played this HU completely different from my last two posts, (Card Dead vs MANIAC, and, Pressuring your weaker opponents). I call this session, ‘Kill, or be Killed’.

By HU I had only seen 63 hands. My opponent has played LAGgy, and seemed to be less aggressive when he missed flops. He made bigger bets with strong hands (when he got to SD), and smaller bets with weak hands (that he either folded, or checked down after a token bet). He slow played a couple of flops, and either, bet the turn, or raised a turn bet. The only hand that went to SD, using that delayed aggression, was a set of 7’s ((97) on an A77 x x board). He’s been forced off his 3-bet hands, when a low flop falls.

His stats:
VPIP 62, PFR 29, 3Bet 29, AF 4.7, AG % 36

I’ve been told that the above stats mean nothing when going in to HU play. I use them to show the tendencies of this player. I need to use all the info available to me, whatever little there is, just might help.

My plan against this opponent:
I’m going to try to be the aggressor. I may change up my PFR size (not reflecting hand strength) from the D/BTN to see how he reacts (just a test). We’re both 40BB+ deep, I may go up to 3BB PFR IP, but not yet comfortable with that size. I’m going to try to get him off hands when he shows weakness (may take two barrels). I may bet scare cards if they support my bluff, but at the same time leave myself enough chips to get back in with a double up. If I get to SD with a weak hand after being aggressive, maybe I can get paid off later with a good hand.

The following are the 21 hands we played:

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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 02:00 AM
(#2)
king_spadez1's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 230
Hand 11 shows just a call from D/BTN - then it shows the BB folding.

I checked my hand history, and that what it shows as well.

That's not how it was played; obviously the BB wouldn't fold to a call.

The D/BTN raised 2.5X, the BB folded.

------------------------------------------------------------

Hmmmmmmm......... maybe I misclicked, and he had auto-fold on.

Last edited by king_spadez1; Tue Dec 13, 2011 at 02:08 AM.. Reason: on second thought...
 
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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 12:02 PM
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JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,830
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hand 4: too big of an overbet preflop, use 3X. You WANT action with that hand HU.

hand 8: it's ok to bet the flop since you got a piece of it, but when the opp calls your bet, you know you're behind. Bluffing the turn with bottom pair is a bad idea.... should have saved those chips for a better hand.

hand 15: since you raised and got 3-bet, it's ok to call preflop. However, you missed that flop totally and the 3-better led out.... get out then, as you're behind. Opp led turn again and you made a bluff at the pot (yes, you took this one down this time and got lucky.... you will lose this hand most of the time)

hand 16: you're out of position. don't min-raise, make it 3X

hand 18: c-bet is fine, but when the opp calls your preflop raise and a c-bet on the flop and then bets the turn... you're behind so fold here and save the chips

other than those things... like the way you were playing. I see you're learning from these, as you play is much better now, than it was a few posts ago. Keep it up
 
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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 12:26 PM
(#4)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
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Hand #1: You raise a weak K on the BTN, and BB calls. You spike bottom pair and villain checks; you win on a C-Bet. This is quite standrd, and ANY pair HU is worth a bet. A common mistake is that some tighter players do NOT do this, so good on you.

Hand #2: Again, quite standard. AJ is a big HU hands, especially vs. a frequent raoser on the BTN, who will call 3Bets pre rather than release. Withon you entry info is the "blue print of reason" for your play. Were he raise/folding on the BTN, AJ may actually be a semi marginal holding if he calls the 3Bet now, but since you;ve seen him CALLING 3bets highly often, the way is clear to bet top pair J kicker with confidence. I would ask you in return though, what do YOU do if he raises you with those 2 spades out there?

Hand #3: I like frequent raises on the BTN normally. But when facing someone who has show a tendency to call 3Bets oop, this may be a BIT too aggro by you. You've taken the advantage, so no sense in bluilding a pot early with a raise IMHO. Now keep in mind, I'm not saying NEVER raise 54s vs a slightly station-y opp, but rather I am saying that since a lot of your "worth" in playing 54s is in the form of your ability to use aggression on your semi bluffs, you need to know he will fold a decent amount of the time.

Hand #4: Not sure I like the shove. I DO agree with your thinking that you might want to OVER RAISE, and vs a station-y villain he miht call the over raise, but moving all in gives you no benefit versus him since it folds out worse, and gets better to call. I am of a mind that a raise of around 1250 to go is large enough to force him to fold most races, yet not so large you cannot let it go if he jams.

Hand #5: You have been pretty aggro, so no real need to play the classical "cheese hands" even HU. I read some stuff by Caro, and depending on your cards, as long as you are playing at least about 65% of your hands, you are playing enough. Q4 is really at the very BOTTOM END of that 65% range, so no real need to paly it with a chip advantage. Good fold.

Hand #6: Free flop + no love = fold on flop to minimize losses. Standard.

Hand #7: Same as hand 5, but with 62o not Q4o.

Hand #8: UGH. This is not a good spot for you. K2o, marginal call hand of the min raise oop. Juuuuust about there though, but it could have gone either way (fold or call). Bottom pair hit, donk lead is fine. When that does not work though, the 2nd bullet is a bit useless and hope-less TBH. A "rule" in HU play tends to be "Raise light, call heavy", so with him CALLING, that should throw up sign posts before the 2nd bullet that he isn't going away. Had you held a viable re-draw, I can see betting bottom pair as a semi bluff with those extra outs, but absent them, this is a bit "meh". It cost you the chip lead, but it didn;t knock you out at least.

Hand #9: 45o is a lot like hand #3. I am not sure I like the immediate raise here with it, simply because the last pot, a big win for the opp, might have emboldened him to try a call/call line against you. Still, as I said about hand #3, I cannot COMPLAIN about doing it at least some of the time (the raise pre that is), I jsut think this is a tricky spot for you to try it.

Hand #10: No action.

Hand #11: No action.

Hand #12: No action.

Hand #13: Standard type raise hand on the BTN HU. No flop taken.

Hand #14: No Action.

Hand #15: K2s on the BTN, I like raising that hand. The weak stab bet is also a decent flat by you, but somewhat risky. When you see the 2nd small bet, I really like that you turned your K into a raising hand, as chances are good that he is not a big hit here (or else the villain would have seen your call as an opening to bet stronger). I'm torn as to whether this is a thin value bet, or a bluff, but I would be prone to think it is really a nicely seen thin value bet by you. Nice take down, well played.

Hand #16: Again with 2 bullets. At least in this hand a river scare card came, and you had ZERO chance of showing down a winner. Still, more often than not in HU, if 1 bullet does not work, a 2nd bullet is just flushing $ down the drain. I'm not saying this is ALWAYS true, but you need info that a villain will float you 1 bet then FOLD before you start trying 2 bullets frequently.

Hand #17: Same as hand #5.

Hand #18: Strong enough to raise pre. C-bet is standard. The turn check/call is fine, as again he bet very small. That sniffs like not an A, but rather a 5 or 8. It is a thin draw to your overs with 1 to come, but if you hit it, the villain might pay you. No river spike, and it goes check/check. This is what 1 bullet fired looks and feels like versus a calling station! :-)

Hand #19: You are short enough now in your stack, and your hand is good enough to take this risk. if ou have 55/44/33, maybe you can fold, but 88/77/99...I'm calling here too.

Hand #20: Not in love with the raise oop here after you;ve gotten the chip lead back. The thing is though, you do what you should be doing when you flop the gut shot; bet your semi bluff. If you were not going to do that, then you would be turning your reasoning pattern for raising 97s on its head. So while I do not liek the oop raise with this hand, it is somehing you should do at least SOME of the time, as long as you bet your draw flops like this.

Hand #21: Flatitng the 3bet by the short stack oop is not terrible, but only because it was small. I do hope you would not have caleld a shove with Q9o though. He didn;t stand here, and got himself comitted. You flopped top pair versus his overs, and held. Nice job.

Hope it helps.

-JDean
 
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Here's what I was thinking - Tue Dec 13, 2011, 09:01 PM
(#5)
king_spadez1's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWK24 View Post
like the way you were playing. I see you're learning from these, as you play is much better now, than it was a few posts ago. Keep it up
Thanks JWK24 and JDean, for your time and input!

Here’s what I was thinking:

Hand 2: (@JDean) I’d be in a tough spot if he raised. Didn’t have any evidence that he semi-bluffed during the session. He liked to be the 1st aggressor to a street, unless he was slow playing. If he had AA, maybe he’d slow play and wait for my flop C-bet. He might, or might not raise with a flopped set, he slow played a flopped set of 7’s during the session. But, here he would have reason to protect his set with a raise. I may lay the hand down, and wait for a better time to get my chips in.

Hand 4: Didn’t want to play the 99 OOP; 71% of the time (when I haven’t caught a set) there will be at least 1 over card, and I would find the hand hard to play. I felt if he didn’t have 2 over cards to my 9’s he wouldn’t call, even with two over cards he might balk. If he called in the latter case, we are racing. But the real down side is that if he had an over pair to my 9’s, I’m really hurting. Also we were just a bit too deep for my shove. I may give JDean’s solution (a larger 3-bet) some thought in the future. In a short session this might not be a ‘tell’, but better players or players that have seen me make this play, may pick up on it, and counter my play.

Hand 8: I was putting pressure on him to step up or get out. But the cost of failing at this point was too costly. So many things going against my OOP turn bet, only reason I did it was to get him to fold possible over cards. Poor play on my part.

Hand 15: This was read dependent. During the SNG, his bet sizing was in relation to his hand strength. Plus, I was the initial raiser this hand (even though he 3-bet); therefore he had as much to fear from the AQQ flop as I did (if he didn’t catch a piece of the flop). Once he made another small bet (same size as flop), I wasn’t sure if I was ahead, but knew I had to bet. I felt I could get him off the hand.

Hand 16: (@JWK24, I just called PF. Maybe you meant another hand). He didn’t make a C-bet IP on the flop, was he slow playing? He slow played a flopped set during the SNG the same way. But, after he called my turn ‘donk’ (do you call it a donk if he wasn’t the aggressor on the flop? – but he was the last aggressor), I put him on some kind of a hand. He didn’t try to get me off a possible draw by reraising, was he afraid I hit the turn ‘hard’ and had a made hand? Maybe he had hit it hard? When the river was the Ah, it fit perfectly with my turn bet of the Jh. Thought I could rep the flush, so I gave it a shot.

Hand 18: I felt his PF limp was either a slow play or a drawing hand. Figured I’d find out PF, or on the flop. I wanted to be the aggressor against this guy. He called my C-bet; was his slow played premium pair scared by the possibility I hit the A? Did he hit the A hard (set)? Or was he holding a 5x (suited or connected or set of 5’s), maybe even a low to middle PP (but I thought he would have made a PFR with all pairs). I was almost convinced he didn’t have a PP. When he bet small on the turn IP, I felt he had 5’s or air, so I called. I was getting just about the right pot odds to fish for a Q or J. The river was checked down, and I was right, he showed 5’s.

Hand 21: His small 3-bet keep me in the hand. Getting 3:1 odds and being IP without risking much was OK by me. I was hoping to hit the flop in some way. I hit the flop better than expected, and was quite willing to go for the win by putting him AI.
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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 09:33 PM
(#6)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by king_spadez1 View Post

Hand 2: (@JDean) I’d be in a tough spot if he raised. Didn’t have any evidence that he semi-bluffed during the session. He liked to be the 1st aggressor to a street, unless he was slow playing. If he had AA, maybe he’d slow play and wait for my flop C-bet. He might, or might not raise with a flopped set, he slow played a flopped set of 7’s during the session. But, here he would have reason to protect his set with a raise. I may lay the hand down, and wait for a better time to get my chips in.
Very nice answer. If you are pretty clear on what to do in a variety of situations, you are definately on top of the game. That's why I asked the Q I did.

You answered it exactly as you should have answered if you weighed all possibilities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by king_spadez1 View Post
Hand 4: Didn’t want to play the 99 OOP; 71% of the time (when I haven’t caught a set) there will be at least 1 over card, and I would find the hand hard to play. I felt if he didn’t have 2 over cards to my 9’s he wouldn’t call, even with two over cards he might balk. If he called in the latter case, we are racing. But the real down side is that if he had an over pair to my 9’s, I’m really hurting. Also we were just a bit too deep for my shove. I may give JDean’s solution (a larger 3-bet) some thought in the future. In a short session this might not be a ‘tell’, but better players or players that have seen me make this play, may pick up on it, and counter my play..
I do agree, a larger than standard raise with a hand like 99 might represent a dis-connect in your pattern that an aware and opportunistic opponent can exploit. Realistically though, versus the info you gave on this opp here, he didn't seem the type. He was far more station-y, and that is why I suggested the larger raise sizing, but not an all in.

A) You build the pot in case you see only 1 over card on the board; gotta remember, ANY pair in HU play is a monster, and 2 pair to the board is quite strong. You can then put more pressure on with a C-Bet. BTW: 99 will see at least 1 over about 79.3% of the time (w/o you having a set). BUT, about 44.4% of the time there will only be 1 over. That is about 65% of flops that are quite solid for you HU.

B) You can possibly get him to fold weak RACES to you more often. If you can do that, a small win is better than a loss. This guy seems station-y enough to chase something like QJ if he holds 2 board overs. That is "meh" for you as firing 2 bullets isn't likely to work versus him once he gets "donkey stubborn" in a pot.

I definately agree with your point about a dis-connect bet though, I just do not see this guy as being someone who makes this a huge risk ...
 
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Tue Dec 13, 2011, 10:30 PM
(#7)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,830
(Super-Moderator)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by king_spadez1 View Post

Hand 4: In a short session this might not be a ‘tell’, but better players or players that have seen me make this play, may pick up on it, and counter my play.

Hand 16: (@JWK24, I just called PF. Maybe you meant another hand). He didn’t make a C-bet IP on the flop, was he slow playing? He slow played a flopped set during the SNG the same way. But, after he called my turn ‘donk’ (do you call it a donk if he wasn’t the aggressor on the flop? – but he was the last aggressor), I put him on some kind of a hand. He didn’t try to get me off a possible draw by reraising, was he afraid I hit the turn ‘hard’ and had a made hand? Maybe he had hit it hard? When the river was the Ah, it fit perfectly with my turn bet of the Jh. Thought I could rep the flush, so I gave it a shot.

Hand 18: I felt his PF limp was either a slow play or a drawing hand. Figured I’d find out PF, or on the flop. I wanted to be the aggressor against this guy. He called my C-bet; was his slow played premium pair scared by the possibility I hit the A? Did he hit the A hard (set)? Or was he holding a 5x (suited or connected or set of 5’s), maybe even a low to middle PP (but I thought he would have made a PFR with all pairs). I was almost convinced he didn’t have a PP. When he bet small on the turn IP, I felt he had 5’s or air, so I called. I was getting just about the right pot odds to fish for a Q or J. The river was checked down, and I was right, he showed 5’s.
for the reply to hand 4.. that's why I always try to use a 3X raise, regardless. That way the opp will not be able to pick up any tells from my bet sizes. They won't know if I've got AA or marginal/speculative hands... all preflop raises are the same.

hand 16: it was the way the replayer looked when I hit the forward button. I think here, since you have the worst possible hand, 23s, that has zero showdown value, you need to check/fold on it. If you hit a part of the board, then I think it's ok betting and trying to rep the flush, but I'd want at least 1 pair of something to fall back on.

hand 18: by checking the turn, I think it makes any opp that has a 5 feel that it's good. If you're going to try and get an opp off of a 5 here (if they have that or a small pocket), you'd really need to value bet the turn too. If you're going to bluff at a pot, then you need to make every street feel right, for the cards you're trying to rep. If the opp is going to call with any piece of the flop, then I think it's better to just check it down and go to the next hand.
 

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