Home / Community / Forum / Poker Education / Texas Hold'Em Tournament Section (MTTs & STTs) /

need to be happy to win the pot?

Old
Default
need to be happy to win the pot? - Sat Dec 17, 2011, 07:13 PM
(#1)
marvinsytan's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,453
Sorry, this hand was deleted by its owner

i dont want to value bet my nut flush cause im out of position

dont like to be put in bad spot this is deep stack

did i play this hand right

dont want to be greedy

happy to win the pot

because my flush paired the board
 
Old
Default
Sat Dec 17, 2011, 08:23 PM
(#2)
TrumpinJoe's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 4,557
While the turn brought the one spade you didn't want to see, I think you need to value bet the river here after checking the flop.
 
Old
Default
Sat Dec 17, 2011, 08:25 PM
(#3)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,510
(Head Trainer)
I really don't care for how you played this hand at all. You are leaving way too much value on the table checking the turn and river. I think talking about not being greedy is simply a justification for the play, but it has no basis in sound strategy (btw, poker is a greedy game, when you're playing a hand every action you take is designed to be "greedy" ). There is very little chance either opponent has a full house, but you can absolutely extract value from many worse hands and should definitely be value betting the river here, in not immediately betting on the turn (I'd bet the turn personally).

The preflop call is fine, but on the flop a check/call line is not optimal imo. You could lead at this board as a semibluff. Or, this is a great spot to check-raise all in. The preflop raiser c-bets, by check-raise jamming you are leveraging fold equity and will take down the pot immediately without having to improve a decent % of the time, and when you do get called you'll have anywhere from 9 to 15 outs in the vast majority of cases, good hand equity vs. their calling ranges. Check-raise jamming the flop is much more +EV than check-calling, which is likely -EV actually.


Head Live Trainer
Check out my Videos

4 Time Bracelet Winner



 
Old
Default
Sat Dec 17, 2011, 08:57 PM
(#4)
marvinsytan's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,453
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLangolier View Post
I really don't care for how you played this hand at all. You are leaving way too much value on the table checking the turn and river. I think talking about not being greedy is simply a justification for the play, but it has no basis in sound strategy (btw, poker is a greedy game, when you're playing a hand every action you take is designed to be "greedy" ). There is very little chance either opponent has a full house, but you can absolutely extract value from many worse hands and should definitely be value betting the river here, in not immediately betting on the turn (I'd bet the turn personally).

The preflop call is fine, but on the flop a check/call line is not optimal imo. You could lead at this board as a semibluff. Or, this is a great spot to check-raise all in. The preflop raiser c-bets, by check-raise jamming you are leveraging fold equity and will take down the pot immediately without having to improve a decent % of the time, and when you do get called you'll have anywhere from 9 to 15 outs in the vast majority of cases, good hand equity vs. their calling ranges. Check-raise jamming the flop is much more +EV than check-calling, which is likely -EV actually.

very helpful

tnx Dave
 
Old
Default
Sat Dec 17, 2011, 08:59 PM
(#5)
marvinsytan's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 6,453
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrumpinJoe View Post
While the turn brought the one spade you didn't want to see, I think you need to value bet the river here after checking the flop.
next time i will value bet why am i so afraid of the full when the action is hey no one got a full the all check..

ok need to improve
 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com