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K,K in bb vs unknow in sb

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K,K in bb vs unknow in sb - Fri Jan 06, 2012, 01:46 PM
(#1)
deadeyz's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 114


The opp had opened once from highjack position won the blinds pre-flop. I got involved in one hand before this and won it on the river without show down. Did I play this hand right given that I had no information about opp as this was only the 10th hand after I joined the table. Specifically were the bet sizes pre-flop and on the flop any good? Is flatting on the flop good play or just get it allin since the opp is showing strength?

Cheers.

Last edited by deadeyz; Fri Jan 06, 2012 at 02:29 PM.. Reason: Add. info
 
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Fri Jan 06, 2012, 02:14 PM
(#2)
mtnestegg's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,336
The way that hand played out preflop, I put him on either an under set or aces ( unless this guy over values tptk)(or is just a drooler) but given there's only one K left out there, aces or under set seems most reasonable. I love your flat of his ck/raise, as it give him the chance to barrel the turn, which he happily (for you) did. I think the way he played this, your hand almost played itself. Snap calls!

Last edited by mtnestegg; Fri Jan 06, 2012 at 02:59 PM..
 
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Fri Jan 06, 2012, 02:25 PM
(#3)
taomage's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 134
Hey,

Well your raise pre-flop is standard with KK and he calls. You get a great flop hitting your set and no flush draws out there only a low straight draw. You make a nice bet and get raised! This is a very interesting point, considering we have no information about this guy makes it a little bit thougher though. The fact he makes a raise could mean 2 things, he is either trying to steal the pot there or he does have a hand, AK, QQ, a lower set, or maybe even AA. Anyway at that point a call would be ok I guess, might wanna have re-raised him but anway the turn. The turn brings a 7 and would complete the straight for 89 and 34, Considering the fact he has raised you on the flop that is very very unlikely, so I would totally go for a call there.

At least, that is what I think about this hand with a player I have no information about.

Cheers
 
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Fri Jan 06, 2012, 03:43 PM
(#4)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,499
(Head Trainer)
Hi deadeyz,

It looks fine to me. When the villain check-raises the flop he's generally got 1 of 3 things: A smaller set, AA/AK, or a bluff. A straight draw is possible but not very likely.

If you 3b the flop he'll get it in with AK+ (and probably the few times he has a straight draw) but you'll fold out any bluffs.

When you flat call his check-raise, he will likely barrel and commit with all of the above, including any bluffs in his range, so you can maximize value. Also having position is a key here, since he has no free card option on the turn... if he checks again you can still bet. So ultimately I like the line you took.

Dave


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Fri Jan 06, 2012, 04:09 PM
(#5)
JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLangolier View Post
Hi deadeyz,

It looks fine to me. When the villain check-raises the flop he's generally got 1 of 3 things: A smaller set, AA/AK, or a bluff. A straight draw is possible but not very likely.

If you 3b the flop he'll get it in with AK+ (and probably the few times he has a straight draw) but you'll fold out any bluffs.

When you flat call his check-raise, he will likely barrel and commit with all of the above, including any bluffs in his range, so you can maximize value. Also having position is a key here, since he has no free card option on the turn... if he checks again you can still bet. So ultimately I like the line you took.

Dave
+1

The only thing I MIGHT change is the sizing of your raise on the flop.

You only made it 70c to go over a 30c lead, and you probably could have gone as high as 90c without any real loss of action. Your raise is just a 1.33 times raise, when a more standard amount is somewhere between 1.5 and 2.5 times (75c to $1.05 to go).

In spots like this, your goal should be to be INVITING, but also to do whatever you can to get all the chips in.

I admit, this is nit picking a bit, so please do not take what I am saying to be that I think you were WRONG.

It is just that if a slightly larger bet will tend to be as inviting as a smaller bet, then the larger bet is "better". You really do not know that for sure until AFTER you bet though, so wanting action as much as you do here, there is nothing at all wrong with opting for the smaller sizing to make it more inviting "just in case".

The small amount extra will tend to make all subsequent bets and calls larger though, so that may result in more profit for you, as long as the villain doesn't "wake up" to the fact he might be beat.

to be really honest, in this pot the SPR going to the turn has grown so beneficial after the villain's C/R anyway, the sizing you choose is pretty moot. But if you are in even DEEPER money situations, or if the Villain C/R's for less (like a min C/R), that extra bit you added on the flop helps sets up a BETTER SPR for you to commit on, and for your opp to commit on too.


Double Bracelet Winner

Last edited by JDean; Fri Jan 06, 2012 at 04:15 PM..
 

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