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As3s on bttn vs utg raise, 10nl6max

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As3s on bttn vs utg raise, 10nl6max - Sun Feb 26, 2012, 06:13 AM
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rule110's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 147
Hi everyone,

The first hand I observed after sitting at this table, while I was sitting-out waiting for the blinds to reach me, involved my opponent 4bet shoving ai w/ AhJh for 101.6bb oop in the CO vs the bttn. He lost the pot to the bttn's KsKc.

From this hand I noted that this opponent seemed to aggressively overvalue suited aces, which are essentially drawing hands. So I could also reasonably suppose that he would overvalue many of his other draws as well. Clearly it would be profitable to play hands vs this opponent in position.

Roughly ten hands passed between this first hand, and the hand I played vs this opponent, during which I saw him play around 3-4 hands. So he also seemed to be fairly loose.

I was dealt As3s on the bttn, and I called his utg raise because I expected him to overplay many hands oop. Also, seeing as he had raised utg, he might feel the need to "rep" strength, making most of my desicions easy postflop.


Sorry, this hand was deleted by its owner

Last edited by rule110; Sun Feb 26, 2012 at 08:38 AM..
 
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Sun Feb 26, 2012, 02:07 PM
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JDean's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,145
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Hi rule110.

I think you are on the right track in thoughts about how to exploit this opponent, but I am not certain this was the best spot to do it...

Per your information you are facing an opponent who will bet aggressively and over value his holdings. You do not note how OFTEN this opponent is entering pots though, and his looseness will be critical to your ability to play many of your start hands. I must say though, simply based on his aggression level I would widen my standards to include more drawing type hands.

BUT...

What I would be looking for are hands which can flop hands that I can willingly commit on.
Does A3s really fit that profile here?

(It could, based on this opp's looseness, but we can't know with your info)

I think I'd be looking to flat some raises with T9s/JTs/QJs/KQs and play them for draw value. You have to assess any pair value of these sorts of hands totally based on the looseness of the opp.

I think I'd also be looking at playing ANY pp in position against this opp (at least until others at the table wake up and start to iso on him).

In short, I prefer to play hands which will give me COMBO draws, oesd + flush, oesd/flush + over card(s), gut shot + flush, OR hands that will make very STRONG hands (sets) or be very cheap to fold.

It strikes me that A3 really has one way draw value, as versus this guy an A with a 3 kicker may not give great over card potential. Calling raises from this guy with the intent to flat nut flush draws that you might flop can be proportionally HIGHER cost versus him. since his play patterns also tend to give you the implied odds you want to see though, you will likely end up "chasing" a lot of these weaker draws at a higher price, so I think i'd prefer to remove those weaker draw potential hands from my start hand selections.

An example of why I say this is the hand here...

You flat on the BTN with A3, and you flop the gut shot.

Because you and the opp have $9+ behind the flat, you only need to feel that you can derive about $6 (a bit over) from spiking to peel the turn.

You can expect with his extreme play style that this opp MIGHT pay that.

So you feel "obliged" to peel the turn after paying to see the flop. I'd probably feel that way too had I gotten myself into this spot...

But if this guy is extremely wide as well as extremely spew-y, a wheel might not be good enough to win if you hit it. You do peel, you do spike, and he does spew off his stack, but you essentially paid 80c total, for a chance to win this guy's stack. do that TOO OFTEN with extremely weak draws and you will likely deplete your stack and see him LEAVE before you can re-coup if you do not adjust start hand standards.

i'd defiantely add this guy to my "friends list" (make a note, do a table search of him, and then you can find him as he will stay on the top of your searched for list), but I would tend to STRENGTHEN the draw value of spec hands I took against him in the future.

Hope it helps.

-JDean


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Sun Feb 26, 2012, 03:14 PM
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oriholic's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 751
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rule110 View Post
Hi everyone,

The first hand I observed after sitting at this table, while I was sitting-out waiting for the blinds to reach me, involved my opponent 4bet shoving ai w/ AhJh for 101.6bb oop in the CO vs the bttn. He lost the pot to the bttn's KsKc.

From this hand I noted that this opponent seemed to aggressively overvalue suited aces, which are essentially drawing hands. So I could also reasonably suppose that he would overvalue many of his other draws as well. Clearly it would be profitable to play hands vs this opponent in position.
Hi rule110,

While this could certainly be the case, from time to time I might 4-bet a hand like AJs as a semi bluff. With an A and J I have blockers to AA and JJ, and I do have an overcard against QQ and KK and an extra splash of equity from the suitedness. Example. I'm playing 6-max pretty loose, very often isolating a limper in position, and another player at the table picks up on this and decides to 3-bet my cutoff iso-raise from the button, possibly light. Since I know that he's capable of 3-betting me light I can 4-bet here some percent of the time. And with a couple nice blockers, big cards, and suitedness I have added equity and playability should he not fold. Still, chances are he is overvaluing a big suited ace.

Quote:
I was dealt As3s on the bttn, and I called his utg raise because I expected him to overplay many hands oop. Also, seeing as he had raised utg, he might feel the need to "rep" strength, making most of my desicions easy postflop.
Fair enough. I like playing suited aces in position, even against a UTG raiser (even a tight one), because of the huge postflop equity almost any hit gives you. If you flop the nut flush draw you generally have about 45% equity in the hand which with the dead money in the pot is often good enough to call an all in, making the semi-bluff clearly profitable (and you can get it in against smaller flush draws, which is huge equity). You always have an overcard to the board or top pair, so you can often float the flop in position, and see what happens on the turn. With a wheel ace (A2-A5) when you flop a gutshot, you have added equity from the ace. You're ahead of all other unpaired draws with your ace high. And as with any suited hand if you flop a pair and a flush draw you're generally in pretty great shape.

The question becomes whether to flat call or 3-bet preflop. It basically comes down to whether the raiser has a big raise/fold range. Generally UTG raisers are opening fairly tight, and 3-betting isn't the best move, as their 4-bet or flatting ranges will often be fairly large and have you in bad shape. Plus it increases the SPR which isn't the best for your situation. Although against a player with a very wide raise/fold range, 3-betting will be very profitable, and a good play with your Axs, small pocket pairs, etc. Here I think I like the flat since he's UTG. Keep the pot small in position. Allows you more room to maneuver postflop.

So you flat and flop pretty good. An overcard and a gutshot. He c-bets and you call. I like this. You often have the best hand, you have a draw to what is almost certainly the best hand, and you have position. Also! By calling your hand looks like either some pair (<TT) or a draw like 67 or 34. SO, you can bet/raise a 9,6,4, A, call on a 3 turn. And bet when checked to on just about anything. (or get to showdown, but eh, about rivercalling with ace-high). With position, possibly the best hand, and getting implied odds of about 20 to 1 I think calling here is pretty standard.

Turn is gin obviously. If he has 67, that's life, but your goal is to get the money in here. Raising is nice, as you should be doing this with your air some of the time, particularly since this should miss his UTG raising range unless he has like AQdd (which you're clearly ahead of). He jams, which he could actually be doing with a fairly wide range, and you only lose to 67 and 36 which are unlikely given his UTG raise anyway.

Well-played.


4 Time Bracelet Winner


 

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