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5c/10c Blinds Cash Game No Limit.

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5c/10c Blinds Cash Game No Limit. - Mon Feb 27, 2012, 05:35 AM
(#1)
etipac's Avatar
Since: Nov 2011
Posts: 116
Too agressive on my big draw??



Guy is a normal TAG with 13/10 stats.. I saw him playing only good hands. Question is did I play it too loose?

Etienne
 
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Mon Feb 27, 2012, 09:40 AM
(#2)
becar1989's Avatar
Since: Dec 2011
Posts: 19
HY!
I think you play it perfectly. He open from button and could have even a worst holding's. After flop your chances are 50/50 vs. KK(vs. AA is 80/20). Check raise is good, give you oportunity to take the pot against semi bluff High A cards and a draw cards. After turn you got a 35% chances to win the pot and his raise matches that so its a easy call. If he bet a pot size bet you probably should fold. I'm not so good player and i will call even a higher bet. River is a good card but didn't give you nut's because he could have an Ace but it's a pretty strong hand.
 
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Mon Feb 27, 2012, 11:22 AM
(#3)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,501
(Head Trainer)
Hi Etienne,

You're leaving out a very crucial piece of info on the villain, his button steal info. 13/10 is pretty nitty (not normal TAG tbh, more towards the nit side of the scale). So some nits will steal from the button and some won't. It's important to know because if the guy doesn't have a steal range and is just opening his normal 13/10 range here then AT is a really clear fold preflop. Out of position in a raised pot without the initiative and a hand dominated by much of his range is not the place we want to be. If he's opening a wide steal range I would actually prefer to 3b preflop. Actually if he has any reasonable steal range at all a 3B preflop is probably better than calling. It takes the initiative and forces the nit to either have or hit a hand, and players who are conservative and risk adverse by nature (the nature of nitty play) won't often have holdings strong enough to get past the flop when we take the initiative away from them, so we win a lot more often with or without improvement. And, if the nit comes back over the top with a 4b, they basically always have us crushed as nits don't really have a 4b bluff range, so we can comfortably 3b/fold pre.

On the flop I like the check-raise but actually would prefer to just get it in right on the flop after he 3-bets. Pretty sure he has an overpair to the board but with at least 1 overcard, nut flush draw, and gut shot straight draw you're a favorite with 2 cards to come. If you 4b jam he can still fold mid-range pocket pairs, and although he's not folding KK, QQ, or JJ I assume, you're still a small favorite over those hands anyway so you're getting the money in good. The problem with flat calling the flop 3b and seeing the turn is when you miss, he can make a bet large enough to price you off a hand that has good equity going to the river still, and when you hit your hand it may be scary enough to shut down your action so you don't stack him. As it was I think you'd still stack him on a spade turn (especially since he's got the Ks), but if the turn was a 3 or ace he might not stack off any more.

Dave


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Wed Feb 29, 2012, 11:38 PM
(#4)
RockerguyAA's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,089
BronzeStar
Agree with The Langolier completely.

AT out of position vs a very tight player is going to be really tough to play. Your behind his range and being suited doesn't help a whole lot(a little though). Easier to fold and avoid getting into trouble.

On the flop I don't think you played aggressively enough actually. You can't really play a monster draw 'too aggressively'. If he keeps reraising you, keep reraising him and get it all-in. Simply calling his reraise on the flop is a mistake that just gives you more opportunities to make further mistakes.
 

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