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Micro stakes STT strategies against fish

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Micro stakes STT strategies against fish - Mon Feb 27, 2012, 02:09 PM
(#1)
fp_boss77's Avatar
Since: Jan 2012
Posts: 490
Hey everyone, I've been playing some Single Table Sng at micro stakes. A usual , micro stakes are full of fishes limping almost every single hand, and calling raises with weak made hands.
But unfortunately they seem to have "luck" on their side lol. Today I got really pissed off when I raised AsKs ( 3x + 1BB for the limper utg ) the big blind defends and the limper folds. Flop comes Ad 3c 2c . BB check and I C-bet 2/3 the pot. Turn comes Jc he checks again and I move all-in with my top/top. He shows Kc4c for the flush.
I mean seriously who calls a raise from a early position ( I was utg+1) with K4. Sometimes is really frustating to see this donkeys doing the most basics mistakes like limping crap utg etc.. and getting away with it so many times lol. I wanted to know your guys opinion to adjust my game or some feedback. I've some videos from Langolier and 19honu about STT and have really helped but this lucky donkeys drive me crazy
 
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Mon Feb 27, 2012, 03:18 PM
(#2)
PanickyPoker's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 3,168
Hi fp_boss77.

I can relate to that sort of experience, since I play a lot of STT's as well and I know that it can be easy to have a major losing session when nobody folds anything. I actually just finished a set of eight $1 45-man's, and I didn't cash in one (last hand was AK vs. A9... guess who won). It happens, though, and part of poker is learning to accept that.

The truth is, when people routinely call preflop with worse hands than yours, they set themselves up to lose lots of money over the long run. Sure, they might hit big, and when they do, they win big, but most of the time you'll be the one who wins big so long as you're not worsening your play to get even. When you're at a table full of horrible players, it can be hard to get through the entire game without busting, because even if you get it in good ten times in a row, you should be getting bad beat a few times. But so long as you're making sure that your play is solid, forget about the other players, because they're all losing money. And if they're all losing money, then the one solid player at the table is going to win it.

As for basic STT strategy, play tight. Seriously nitty preflop and in the early game. If you're playing 98s before the blinds are t150/t300, then you might have a problem. If you want specific training materials, I'd suggest you look through PSO's recorded Live Training sessions and pro videos. There's some pretty quality STT material there.

Hope that helps!
 
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Mon Feb 27, 2012, 03:27 PM
(#3)
OMGBNicolita's Avatar
Since: Feb 2012
Posts: 23
In this particular hand , you bet the fop to take value from weaker aces, from some suited conectors and some intermediar pairs ,he called you ,that indicates he has an Ax a pair type 66-99 ,and a flush draw ...flush completes, so i would have check back turn for pot control ..shoving here is verry bad ! you take all his option to make a mistake ,to bluff at the pot on river...so check back ...if he checks river you must thin value bet ...if he leads strong or 1/2 pot maybe you can find a call because u beat some of his range.


And dont get fustrated if you lose to a flush,you still have some chips to comeback...so check back for pot control !

Also dont get fustrated.....we make our money from donks ! if all players would be semi-decent we will have a small winrate.
 
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Mon Feb 27, 2012, 03:42 PM
(#4)
fp_boss77's Avatar
Since: Jan 2012
Posts: 490
Hey, yeah I'll keep checking out the Live training materials, lots of great stuff there.

The problem is that I play very tight in early phase (which is recommended by the course on PSO) like AQ+ or JJ+. But usually this hands don't come and when the middle phase arrives (around the 4th and 5th blind levels) I'm usually only 10BB deep or less, and the worst is that when I get a premium hand and raise pre-flop, some retarded calls with ridiculous hands 25o and hits a hand lol.

But I still trust in the solid TAG playing style and know that I'll win in the long run.

Just hope this bad beat phase goes away soon

Thanks
 
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Mon Feb 27, 2012, 03:51 PM
(#5)
fp_boss77's Avatar
Since: Jan 2012
Posts: 490
Hey OMGBNicolita !

Yeah, a pot control should've been the best play.

But I saw him and other donkeys calling 3 streets with medium pair or other weak hands that I thought I was ahead mainly by his passive approach. I guess I fell intohis trap lol.
 
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Mon Feb 27, 2012, 04:12 PM
(#6)
PanickyPoker's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 3,168
Quote:
Originally Posted by OMGBNicolita View Post
flush completes, so i would have check back turn for pot control ..shoving here is verry bad !
I disagree. Shoving continues to get value from weaker aces. It also gets value from turned flush draws. Betting the turn would be bad imo if the turn was a fourth card to a suit or if we telepathically knew that flush draws made up most of the villain's flop calling range (which I think usually isn't the case; he will have a lot of pairs in his range). I don't think we should get scared in a heads-up pot and check back when a very large percentage of river cards could improve the villain's hand. I think shoving is typically going to be the best play.
 
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Agree - Mon Mar 05, 2012, 07:41 AM
(#7)
supermagicpr's Avatar
Since: Feb 2012
Posts: 6
Me too experience this. Anyone have any idea how to end up in final table? i seem to be cheap leader in the first two hours. but end up win nothing
 
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Mon Mar 05, 2012, 07:56 AM
(#8)
PanickyPoker's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 3,168
Hi supermagicpr! Welcome to the forums.

Tournaments can be long, and often your chip stack will go up and down drastically even if you're playing well. But it never hurts to study up and make your game better. You can find PSO's courses on learning to play winning poker here, and there's a series of videos here that you might find useful as well.

Thanks for posting!

Last edited by JWK24; Mon Mar 05, 2012 at 05:52 PM..
 
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Fri May 10, 2013, 03:47 PM
(#9)
raccy's Avatar
Since: May 2013
Posts: 130
I've played thousands of micro stakes STTs this year and I know what you're talking about. There's only so much you can do, but as someone said pointed out, you'll get their chips in the long run so be happy to play with them. Low stake tournaments usually come with lots of bad calls and bad beats but that's how you often get to double up too. You just forget the bad calls that double you up and remember the bad beats that get you busted. Human psychology.

If you play a few tables at the same time you're likely to see some of the other players who do the same so you can learn which players are making bad calls a lot and which ones are playing too tight. Once you can spot the limpers who make bad calls, you put them all-in preflop with a better starting hand time and time again. They might give you the bad beat or two but after a while they start to fold their weak hands (or maybe they think their Q4o is a speculative hand?) and you might not run into them the next day anymore.
 
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Sun May 12, 2013, 09:24 AM
(#10)
Ovalman's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,778
Changing gears is critical in STTs, I usually rock up early in a tournament before becoming the table maniac later on. Set mine early on while raise with the same hand when the blinds go up. Just be aware of who's around you, many if not all play the same style throughout. Never bluff someone who won't fold.

Just about sums up my STT strategy
 

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