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Climbing

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Climbing - Fri Jun 15, 2012, 05:29 PM
(#1)
frasierbeams's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 145
Couple of weeks ago had a wee accident while climbing on Buachaille Etive Mor ; fractured my cheekbone , broke my hand , cracked a couple of ribs and had a nasty gash on my forehead .I always thought that when surviving accidents such as this or being hit by a bus ( yes I have been hit by a bus before ) something magical was meant to happen . I wish I hadnt believed all those crappy Hollywood movies when I was younger .NExt month I think I'll try to get hit by lightning or survive being hit by a train to see if my luck changes .

cheers
 
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Fri Jun 15, 2012, 06:14 PM
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EdinFreeMan's Avatar
Since: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,540
Quote:
Originally Posted by frasierbeams View Post
Couple of weeks ago had a wee accident while climbing on Buachaille Etive Mor ; fractured my cheekbone , broke my hand , cracked a couple of ribs and had a nasty gash on my forehead .I always thought that when surviving accidents such as this or being hit by a bus ( yes I have been hit by a bus before ) something magical was meant to happen . I wish I hadnt believed all those crappy Hollywood movies when I was younger .NExt month I think I'll try to get hit by lightning or survive being hit by a train to see if my luck changes .

cheers
Well, as a survivor of many youthful accidents and sports injuries, from a bygone era when they still believed a smidgeon or so of alcohol beforehand improved rather than impaired your driving reflexes and sporting prowess, before UK motorcycle helmet regulations had been introduced, and when rugby players were allowed to stay on the pitch no matter how much blood was oozing from their wounds - I can offer you one piece of knowledge from experience.

Nothing brings back a memory in such clarity as the aches and pains of old wounds.

As soon as my bad knee acts up I am transported back to that idyll of racing around the country roads of Scotland with the wind in my hair (it helps me remember when I had hair too) - just before I came flying off and luckily smashed only the one kneecap to smithereens and not my skull.

When my back aches I don't think of the 3 months in traction, or of the crunching tackle that left me feeling like my legs were on the wrong way round, but of the adrenalin of barrelling around muddy pitches knocking lumps out of other idiots like me, whilst some smaller, faster kids threw that funny shaped ball to each other.

Plus, were it not for severe injury, I never would have met that physiotherapist.....

I guarantee in the long term, every scar, lump ache and pain will be worth it when you are no longer able to do those things and have to rely on memory.

On the other hand - maybe the memories would be even clearer if I hadn't split my head open seven or eight times...



Ed from Edinburgh - EdinFreeMan
 
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Sat Jun 16, 2012, 12:04 AM
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frasierbeams's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 145
Hi Ed,

While I may not be quite the same vintage I too remember all the accidents I had as a youngster , back in the days when kids where allowed to climb trees , play outdoors etc. - when was the last time time you saw a kid with a stookie ? Many moons ago in the space of one summer i managed to put a hole in my head , break both bones in my left arm in 3 places , and , after 18 months of orthodontic work to to correct my squinty bucked teeth , decided that the day after the brace was removed was the perfect day to crack my upper jaw and smash my teeth in while fannying about on bikes .

As for the funny shaped ball games I was one of those faster , smaller kids ; I played at a time when tackling full-backs in the air while trying to collect a high ball was deemed acceptable ; surprised i never had a bad injury as a result of this . I also remember the time that trying to tap-tackle somenone with my eyelid seemed like a good idea . However , throughout my life I have survived much worse than any of these boring anecdotes and can honestly say that nothing causes as much pain and grief as playing poker - I must be a glutton for torment and punishment .

I still fancy trying to get by lightning but I think I think I'll give the train a miss .

Cheers
 
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Sat Jun 16, 2012, 03:42 AM
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Darkman61's Avatar
Since: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,225
BronzeStar
Thinking back to the "old" days. I had a couple of guns and a whole collection of knives when I was probably no more than nine years old. And so did a lot of my friends. Sound staggering? Well absolutely nobody thought this in any way unusual. But then neither did anybody expect any of these weapons to be used (other than for a game of chicken) in a threatening manner against others.

Can you imagine that happening nowadays? I'd probably have been taken into care and seen my parents on the front page of The Sun for being the most irresponsible in Britain. How times have changed.
 
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Sat Jun 16, 2012, 04:05 AM
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Darkman61's Avatar
Since: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,225
BronzeStar
Sorry. That was absolutely nothing to do with climbing, was it
 
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Sat Jun 16, 2012, 04:18 AM
(#6)
EdinFreeMan's Avatar
Since: Feb 2010
Posts: 4,540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkman61 View Post
Thinking back to the "old" days. I had a couple of guns and a whole collection of knives when I was probably no more than nine years old. And so did a lot of my friends. Sound staggering? Well absolutely nobody thought this in any way unusual. But then neither did anybody expect any of these weapons to be used (other than for a game of chicken) in a threatening manner against others.

Can you imagine that happening nowadays? I'd probably have been taken into care and seen my parents on the front page of The Sun for being the most irresponsible in Britain. How times have changed.
When I was a wee lad I was in the most feared gang in our neighbourhood. We all openly carried knives, I had a rather magnificent bowie knife as well as a couple of others. Nobody messed with us!

The gang was called The Scouts - we were bloody good at knots too, and if you were not careful we would come a knocking at your door threatening to do odd jobs for you for little or no payment.



Ed from Edinburgh - EdinFreeMan
 
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Sat Jun 16, 2012, 10:45 AM
(#7)
dopplerboyf5's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 149
BronzeStar
Broken bones, cracked ribs, gashes to the head, gangs,guns,knives.

Nice childhood guys

When I grew up here in Canada the only thing we feared was much worse then all that...


MOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Sat Jun 16, 2012, 08:05 PM
(#8)
Grade b's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,604
the chance of surviving a lighting strike is around 1 in 4.

I too was in a chapter of the "scouts" in fact when older it was my job to instruct members in the correct knife use.

i should have been watching the other instructor of course as he ended up in emerg with an 3 inch cut in his palm.

Grade b


I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught. ~Winston Churchill

13 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Sun Jun 17, 2012, 09:00 PM
(#9)
Deanihilator's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 95
BronzeStar
snipit*
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopplerboyf5 View Post
When I grew up here in Canada the only thing we feared was much worse then all that...


MOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
hahahaha I hear ya on that one.
Reminds me of Eddie Murphy ~ Delirious

And bad with the shoe, carry that shit like a gun,
my mother was like Clint Eastwood with the shoe.

 
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Tue Jun 19, 2012, 08:28 PM
(#10)
buddyzee's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 30
I feel for you with the climbing as I am avid indoor climber ( easier to survive a fall from 30ft then 300ft ). Anyway I just got back into it after tearing my shoulder from its socket. I love climbing it relaxes me. I was afraid I wasnt going to be able to deal with it again but it was like riding a bike...except when I fell off my bike I busted my lip, chin. teeth and had to get a knee replacement so I guess it isnt really like riding a bike...
 

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