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Fold equity - Question? Please assist.

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Fold equity - Question? Please assist. - Sat Jun 30, 2012, 11:09 AM
(#1)
OutTheHouse's Avatar
Since: Apr 2012
Posts: 17
BronzeStar
I just watched 40mins of the Langollers video on fold equity. Do people actually make these calculations while they are playing?
Or is the important aspect to take on board is that people's ranges in terms of % of hands they play changes depending on where you are in a tournament/SNG. Is it just important to understand that if someone is playing ridiculously tight on the bubble, then it could/would be a profitable play to open your own range and try to steal the blinds/antes?

Surely if you try to take advantage of such fold equity, your opponents will catch on to this and may even widen their own range and double steal/protect the blinds?

So how often would it be a good play to try and steal? I seem to have this problem when I end up being heads-up in a microstakes SnG, if I feel the opponent is being tight and only playing a small % of hands, (might be due to lower relative stack) then I raise a large majority of the time, especially when on the button. This seems to be very effective in the short term, putting additional pressure on my opponent, forcing them to fold and reducing their stack. But after repeated attempts, suddenly the opponent is going to wake up with a good hand, and raise, therefore I will often fold my marginal holding. But then they start to get more and more defensive in the BB as they know I have previously folded to a 3bet.

When this starts to happen, should I tighten up my range, even though the opponent seems to be loosing his/her range evidenced by relative increases in the rate of defence/3bet.

Sorry if this is confusing, but for those that understand. I would greatly appreciate your opinions on this matter, as it seems to be a common occurrence during the final stages of a SnG.
 
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Sat Jun 30, 2012, 03:37 PM
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TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,499
(Head Trainer)
Hi OTH,

I think only math savants can do the calcs at the table... key for the rest of us is to do them away from the table, to get a deeper understanding of how fold equity impacts various situations. As you run into spots you're not sure about, note them for a post-game analysis and go back through them away from the table, post for analysis in the forums, discuss with friends. Over time your decisions will become much stronger as a result of this process.

Regarding opponents catching on and adjusting, some do and some don't. In fact many either don't or are very slow to react. Stronger players do identify and adjust much more quickly. Against them the trick is to try and stay one step ahead but recognizing when they seem to be adjusting and re-adjust yourself (perhaps by tightening up your raising range for a while). Heads up is a different beast, players may adjust quicker simply because of the frequency with which you're engaging (every hand) vs. the frequency at a full table. But the process is the same, sounds like you have the right idea in this regard.

Hope this helps.

Dave


Head Live Trainer
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dsf - Sun Jul 01, 2012, 05:13 AM
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OutTheHouse's Avatar
Since: Apr 2012
Posts: 17
BronzeStar
Thanks for your help Dave, I appreciate it.
OTH
 

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