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Pre Flop strategy

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Pre Flop strategy - Sat Jul 07, 2012, 01:21 PM
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Horatio022's Avatar
Since: Jun 2012
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I think i have been trying to run before i could walk with poker. Would it be a fair statement to make that mastering pre flop positioning and starting hands is the solid foundations to being a quite good tight aggresive poker player?

I saw on one of the PS online videos you should only play about 15-20% of your starting hands the rest are folded this would vary depending on situations. So what i have done is printed off an EV starting hand rank guide of the 169 types. Now if i divide 169 by 100 thats 1.69%, 1.69% x 20 is 34 rounded. So from AA (rank 1 starting hand) down to rank 34 hand which is J9 suited, QJ non suited just below J9s these are hands which should be (more)playable depending on position and action of other players. I found this information on wiki as well http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_h...starting_hands and found the hand groups by David Sklansky and Mason Malmuth worth a look. There is approx an 8.5% chance you will get a big hand top 3 groups i.e AA - AQoff.

As i tight aggresive player on low stake 25c 9 man SNG tournys what % of cards would fit into the complete trash catagory?. Any input would be great i think im rambling abit.
 
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Sat Jul 07, 2012, 03:04 PM
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Hi Horatio022!

For me, a lot will depend on the table dynamics too... how the others are playing. If they're playing tighter, then I'd want to play looser. If they're playing loose, then I want to play tighter.

Typically I try to aim for a flop % of about 15-20%, could be slightly higher or lower depending on the cards that I get... and I will see the fewest flops from the SB, since I'm out of position.

Hope this helps.

John (JWK24)


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Trash hands - Sat Jul 07, 2012, 03:27 PM
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bearxing's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 499
The short answer is: it depends. If you have a nit playing less than 10% of hands sitting behind you the hands you play will have a huge variation depending on position. If you are in the small blind and it is folded around ro you then open raising any two cards is profitable.If the nit opens UTG and everybody folds to you in the big blind, everything worse than AK and QQ+ is an auto fold. These starting hand lists are a good starting point for new players. As you gain experience and knowledge, you will learn when to vary your play from these guideline.

Hope this helps
Doug


3 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Sat Jul 07, 2012, 09:57 PM
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TrumpinJoe's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
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Poker is about putting yourself in favorable (+EV or expected value) situations and avoid unfavorable (-EV) situations. Your hole cards are an just one of the things you look for to find a favorable situation. Your position, your image and your read on opponents are all important.

In 9-man non-turbo SnGs paying 3 places your goal should be to finish first or second every time. Unless your at a table of absolute nits playing few hands early on (about the first three levels) is +EV. Let the maniacs give there chips away and then you take them later in the game.

Also in 9-mans you must have a good short handed game. A lot of players, old and new, do not properly adjust to the short-handed game. You must open your game up some and if your opponents don't punish them without mercy.


Good decisions!
 
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Sun Jul 08, 2012, 10:52 AM
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Grade b's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,604
Hi Horatio,

Like the others have said it depends..

So if you are interested in 9 man games you HAVE to check out some of the following videos. (correction if you would like to do well in the 9 man s&g's)

http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/art...-Series-Part-1

(there is a part 2 and 3 too)

http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/art...ade-b-in-a-SNG

http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/art...r77-20-10-2011

http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/art...t-7th-May-2012

Hope this helps

Grade b


I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught. ~Winston Churchill

13 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Sun Jul 08, 2012, 12:09 PM
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Horatio022's Avatar
Since: Jun 2012
Posts: 26
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Thanks all very helpfull . I have been doing some 9 man hyper turbos sng's last night and today they went quite well thanks to the poker education on this site.
 
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Sun Jul 08, 2012, 02:12 PM
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TrustySam's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 8,291
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horatio022 View Post
I think i have been trying to run before i could walk with poker. Would it be a fair statement to make that mastering pre flop positioning and starting hands is the solid foundations to being a quite good tight aggresive poker player?

As i tight aggresive player on low stake 25c 9 man SNG tournys what % of cards would fit into the complete trash catagory?. Any input would be great i think im rambling abit.
Hey, ya, for regular speed SNG's, Spacegravy's charts are legendary around here for being the stone cold nuts

Like is this maybe the sort of chart you were looking to put together?



So it's like pre-flop positioning and starting hands ... and then also stack size relative to the blinds. So he's got that chart for the early phase starting hands by position in Video 1 that Grade b listed. And then in last video for the later stages, when the stacks get smaller relative to the blinds, Spacegravy's TAG ranges open up much wider than most of us learn about those top 10 starting hands:




Like those are rules that'll generally hold for most STT's and tourneys. And then there's some exceptions to the rules too, like (1) that you should shove wide, but call tight - so Spacegravy's chart has A5o as a shove, but calling ranges might instead be those top 10 hands if that - like they're way tight. And then, like top 10 hands are great, but (2) if there's already two people all-in, then sometimes the range to call might just be like AA. Also, (3) Stack sizes relative to the other players' stacks can sometimes matter - like if the big stack shoves into you and you'd have to put your tournament life on the line to call and you're second in chips and have AJs, like most people will fold in that situation rather than risk going bust.

Then there's rules that are specific to each individual type of game. There's a couple of people on the board that used to play those 25c games who were crushing them who have posted tips in the past - if you search for Moxie Pip's posts, I think his have been some of the most thorough, about when to play tight, when to open up, etc.


I can totally relate to what you said about the walking/running thingie. I'm a pretty quick learner too, and it took me over a year to learn to become profitable. And you might be thinking that taking over a year to become profitable doesn't sound like I'm very quick lol. But when you consider that only 10% of players are profitable ... like there's a lot of casual players, but there's also some pretty good players out there even at the beginner tables, and then there's the variance, and the rake - these days I think it takes a lot of knowledge and skill to become profitable over thousands of hands, even at the beginner tables, so it can take a while for most of us ...

Something I used to do while I was still learning is keep my eye out for those deposit promotions, like the Depositor Freerolls, or Micro Millions ticket offer - to sort of offset the costs of learning and stuff.

Sounds like you're on your way to making a go of this, with your strategizing with the starting hands charts, and your observations about finding an edge - best of luck!!

Last edited by TrustySam; Sun Jul 08, 2012 at 02:17 PM..
 

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