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stupid question?

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stupid question? - Sat Jul 14, 2012, 07:54 PM
(#1)
josh012260's Avatar
Since: Sep 2011
Posts: 3
I am wondering. What are the odds of a player being successful, when incapable of making all of these insane probability equations within 50 seconds? Pot odds, odds and outs, discount odds, etc etc. This makes poker seem as if it is only for those who are Math wiz, pre calculus geniuses?
Its frustrating to watch these course videos, and have them go over fourteen hundred different equations at once, and expect us to know all of it. Please tell me, are there any professionals, who have made it, without 100% understanding, down to the tee, all of these equations?
 
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Sat Jul 14, 2012, 08:18 PM
(#2)
bearxing's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 499
*Post moved to better fitting forum*


3 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Sat Jul 14, 2012, 09:49 PM
(#3)
TrumpinJoe's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 4,557
First no honest question is stupid.

Good poker players make mathematically correct most of the time. The better the player the more correct decisions. That doesn't mean they do complicated math at the table. Some may use nothing beyond simple math and a lot of experience. As you play you will find that you will face a lot of similar situations. Pair vs over pair wins about 20% of the time. Two over cards against a pair is a "coin flip" or almost 50:50 or even money. And there are several more you will learn as you face them.

Also simple is the rule of 2. There are 52 cards in the deck so any one card has almost a 2% probability of coming up at a certain time. If you have TPTK (top pair top kicker) with two to a flush on board and you hold none of the flush cards an opponent hits the flush draw, if he has it, about ~18% of the time on each street. So recognizing the situation you are is critical then you can approximate where you stand.

You learn to approximate where you stand by studying past hands and you can also find tables of common situation on the 'net. So study and be aware at the table will get you there but it isn't a quick trip.

Good Decisions!
 
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Sat Jul 14, 2012, 10:01 PM
(#4)
josh012260's Avatar
Since: Sep 2011
Posts: 3
thanks trumpin joe. Your right about asking questions, I was just getting very frustrated. I never did excell at math, I do understand it when I practice it, but I haven't for so long its frustrating. Thanks for the advice and information. The rule of 4 and 2 I am going to start implementing into my game. the 2% chance, I have never heard of, good info to get. Learning something new everyday.
 
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Sun Jul 15, 2012, 06:34 AM
(#5)
royalraise85's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 26,019
(Community Coordinator)
Hi josh012260,

I completely agree with everything TrumpinJoe has said. Successful and profitable players have worked very hard to get to where they are in terms of experience and ability.

But remember that at one stage they also were exactly where you are at now. There is no quick solution and everyone with aspirations needs to work very hard on their game.

I've found two videos in the library from Dave 'TheLangolier' that might interest you.


Also, can I say that it's great to see you posting here at the school, here's a link that will help you find your way around the place.


Good luck at the Tables!

Raiser


Moderator

Bracelet Winner


 
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Mon Jul 16, 2012, 01:15 AM
(#6)
josh012260's Avatar
Since: Sep 2011
Posts: 3
thanks guys so much. I am trying to become dedicated to figuring this all out. Playing micro tables daily, and keeping up with tight aggressive. I always end up going broke, by losing after attempting NL heads up. Is heads up more difficult for beginners? I find I get too confident in certain hands, that I wouldn't in a bigger table. Either that or getting trapped easier, and or calling stuff just to see the river. Playing with conviction would stop these impulses... I mean is there a way to master the art of heads up? Eventually, being a tournament player, heads up becomes inevitable, and unavoidable. But aren't your chances significantly lower for winning at this point, due to constant action, and or positions not changing?
 
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Mon Jul 16, 2012, 11:42 AM
(#7)
Grade b's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by josh012260 View Post
thanks guys so much. I am trying to become dedicated to figuring this all out. Playing micro tables daily, and keeping up with tight aggressive. I always end up going broke, by losing after attempting NL heads up. Is heads up more difficult for beginners? I find I get too confident in certain hands, that I wouldn't in a bigger table. Either that or getting trapped easier, and or calling stuff just to see the river. Playing with conviction would stop these impulses... I mean is there a way to master the art of heads up? Eventually, being a tournament player, heads up becomes inevitable, and unavoidable. But aren't your chances significantly lower for winning at this point, due to constant action, and or positions not changing?

How about 1 day playing followed by a day of study.

Horro has a whole series of heads up Videos and runs regular live trainings.


Grade b


I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught. ~Winston Churchill

13 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Mon Jul 16, 2012, 11:50 AM
(#8)
wiltshireman's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,568
(Moderator)
Hi josh012260

This link will take you to a list of video's you may find helpful as Grade quite rightly suggested.
Good luck.


Moderator
 

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