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SNG, $1.50, middle phase, pair of 8's

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SNG, $1.50, middle phase, pair of 8's - Fri Jul 20, 2012, 04:22 PM
(#1)
marino563's Avatar
Since: Jul 2012
Posts: 5
Hi!

So I had 88 in the hole and I have been trying to follow the SNG course on this site to the letter. The person before me raised pre-flop and since I had a 'category 4' hand, with 10-5 BB I pushed all in (as I had less than 12BB). The problem is I done this knowing that this was a tight player I was up against so I thought he must have something good, however being quite tight myself surely I need to be aggressive when the time comes?

http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/rep...ash=8AA2B51133
 
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Fri Jul 20, 2012, 07:07 PM
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JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,809
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Hi marino563!

With this being a STT, I need to get to the top 3 to get ITM, then try to take the tourney down. Sitting last of 5 and needing to basically double-up to get to a top 3 position, I'm looking for every opportunity that I can in order to accumulate chips.
When the table big-stack makes an open-raise, one thing that I would look at here is.... is this a standard opening raise for them? If not, is it higher or lower than what they normally have been betting? The reason for this, as if the bets are not standard, it could be a tell as to whether or not the opp would have a strong or weak hand. If it is a non-std raise amount, then I would react accordingly.
Since I have less than 15BB, I do not have a deep enough stack to setmine, so that narrows my decision to either a raise or fold. If I raise, then a standard raise (3X the opp's bet) will put me all-in.. so I will shove or fold.
I need to accumulate chips and with a mid pair, I'm willing to play the hand here for all my chips and will shove, hoping to take the pot down preflop (which could happen if the opp is extremely tight), or to be heads-up with an opportunity to get into the top 3 in chips.

I want to be in situations like this and it is a great example of why bankroll management is so important. I need to be taking chances like this with marginal made hands, where I could get into an ITM position during the middle portion of a tourney. The majority of the times, I'll be in a race here and will be about 50-50 to double-up and get to 3rd chip stack. I also will be dominated some by a higher pair and could also dominate a lower pair too.

Hope this helps and good luck at the tables.

John (JWK24)


Super-Moderator



6 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Sat Jul 21, 2012, 10:16 AM
(#3)
ahcrata's Avatar
Since: Feb 2012
Posts: 40
You have few chips. You need to acumulate chips to survive there. The bettor can have a lot of hands worst than your. So I could push in this situation with 88 since the bettor is stealing with a lot of hands. But I think the best approach is to fight against medium stacks. If you fold with 88 here you should push against medium stack often.

That is my approach:

53.13% Villain: 77+,A9s+,KTs+,QTs+,JTs,ATo+,KJo+
46.87% Hero: 88

Had 640 on Pot and the Villain will call you. Then you had pot odds 1140 / 2580 = 44,19% . As the odds are better than pot odds you can push here and will have profit in long run.

Now I will read the JWK24 post and see if my approach is good.

Last edited by ahcrata; Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:14 PM..
 
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Sat Jul 21, 2012, 12:23 PM
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JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,809
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Hi Ahcrata!

I'd have used a slightly different range for the opp... but the results will be similar and you have the correct thought process.

Since the hand equity is higher than the pot equity, it will be a +EV play over time... and that's what we're looking for. Positive plays that will gain chips over time. Yes, some will lose, but on average we'll gain chips.

The one thing that I'd be looking at was gaining chips against any opp, not just the medium stacks.
Much more often than not, players that get to be the big stack achieved it by making too many marginal-at-best plays, overbetting them and getting lucky. If this is the case, they're just as likely to give their chips away as quckly or even faster than they got them. Of course this will be dependant on the opp and how they are playing. Finding who the player at the table that overbets these marginal hands is something that I specifcally look for at a table. They WILL give their chips away sooner or later and I hope to get a hand against them, so that I can use them as a chip ATM.

John (JWK24)


Super-Moderator



6 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Sat Jul 21, 2012, 07:21 PM
(#5)
marino563's Avatar
Since: Jul 2012
Posts: 5
Thanks for the responses guys, they are very usefull.

One quick question though ahcrata, and I apologise if its a stupid one, are the hands you have assigned to the villain all the ones more likely to beat mine. If so is there a quick way to work that out, with the %'s, in the game or is that something I can only do after to check if I was right to push?
 
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Sat Jul 21, 2012, 10:12 PM
(#6)
ahcrata's Avatar
Since: Feb 2012
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino563 View Post
Thanks for the responses guys, they are very usefull.

One quick question though ahcrata, and I apologise if its a stupid one, are the hands you have assigned to the villain all the ones more likely to beat mine. If so is there a quick way to work that out, with the %'s, in the game or is that something I can only do after to check if I was right to push?
Maybe you can do it during the game. As you said the villain is tight I thought he could have this range. After the game you can check what is your hand equity against a range of hands. You can use two software to do that, Pokerstove or Equilab. After you check a lot of situations you will know what to do by heart. I think most players do that too. Most players uses the software Sit and Go Wizard.
 

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