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STT $ 1,50, 77, re steal

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STT $ 1,50, 77, re steal - Sat Jul 21, 2012, 11:32 AM
(#1)
ahcrata's Avatar
Since: Feb 2012
Posts: 40
Sorry, this hand was deleted by its owner

When this re steal is profitable?
 
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BTN range wide - Sat Jul 21, 2012, 02:41 PM
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king_spadez1's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahcrata View Post
When this re steal is profitable?
There are no reads given on the villain, the type of tourney, or buy-in. This looks like a STT, with the hero sitting on 26BB’s. No info on how long this blind level has left; this may have an impact on this hand, as the next blind level finds the hero with only a 13BB stack.

In general a LP raise is wider than an EP raise. With the villain raising 3BB, it gives more incentive to resteal the pot. The hero may gain 20% of his stack without a SD by getting the BTN to fold. Being OOP with a vulnerable hand, it is a nice 3-bet shove spot. 26BB is a bit much to shove, but the alternatives are, 3-bet and calling if 4bet AI, 3-bet ‘Go and Go’ play, or fold. This is one of those hands that falls right in the middle, and reads are a must to make an educated decision. A 3-bet shove gives us the most ‘fold equity’.

If the BB is opening as tight as a 24% range, but only calling an 8%, we’ll have 66% fold equity. This is a +EV play, and we will still have around 40% equity if called. In general I believe our fold equity is greater, and the BTN’s opening range is wider, giving us even greater +EV. I didn’t run this though an ICM calc, but I don’t relish the fact that the blinds may be going up before I can try to maneuver and chip-up. Once the blinds go up, I don’t want to possibly risk a 12BB shove (much less fold equity) vs. a big stack.


"May the cards be with you!"
 
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Sat Jul 21, 2012, 03:00 PM
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JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,836
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Hi ahcrata!

With 77, early in a tourney, I do not want to be shoving here. 26BB is way, way too much to even consider shoving with. 5BB, yes... 26BB, no way. Shoving way too many chips too early in a tourney will normally accomplish one thing, getting value-owned. I'll fold out any hands worse than mine and only get called by hands better, which is the exact opposite of what I would like to have happen.

A player open-raising from the button should be playing a wider range and since I have plenty of chips to setmine with (15+BB), I'm going to call here and then re-evaluate after the flop. I have plenty of chips to be playing post-flop with and want to be able to do so.

The flop (with 325 already in the pot due to a call) gives me bottom set. I do want to make a value bet on the flop and will bet 2/3 pot here. I'll bet this amount, as it is small enough to maybe get called, but large enough to make drawing at a flush, straight or combo draw a negative play for the opp.

The turn brings an overcard and a second flush draw. Here, I will again bet 2/3 pot and if the opp shoves, then I'm calling.

The river completes the flush and here is where I'll get the rest of my chips in.. and hope that the opp does not have the flush. If they do, then it is a bad play for them, as they made a -EV call on both the flop and the turn.

The key here is to play after the flop. Shoving too many chips too often, too early will be nothing but a problem in the long run, as I will normally be value-owning myself.

Hope this helps and good luck at the tables.

John (JWK24)


Super-Moderator



6 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Sat Jul 21, 2012, 07:32 PM
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RobinQQQ's Avatar
Since: Jul 2010
Posts: 115
Without reads its hard to answer your question. I'd only be shoving here if the opp had been picking on my blind every time he got the chance. Having said that I think his call is worse than your shove so maybe justice was done.
Rob.
 

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