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2nl Zoom - JJ OTB. Turn shove.

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2nl Zoom - JJ OTB. Turn shove. - Thu Sep 06, 2012, 09:43 AM
(#1)
Croyd93's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 639
One of the tough things about zoom is playing against unknowns. Here's another spot I struggled with.

Sorry, this hand was deleted by its owner

Pre flop I could 3-bet but I'm on the button and prefer to play post flop in position rather than a pre flop guessing game if I get 4-bet; I don't like getting stacks in pre with JJ vs a 4-bet range so elect to just call. The SB then 3-bets and the OR folds, I'll have position the whole hand and have a pretty solid hand so I call the 3-bet and take a flop.

The flop is good for my hand and the opponent leads for around 2/3 pot. I hold an overpair and there's not much that I was ahead of that I'm now behind in the opponents range. I'm still behind to bigger PP but he would most likely fire all misses such as AK offsuit and suited and AQs especially if suited in clubs, he may also take this line with TT. I'm doing pretty good against his range and I don't think I should fold to one bet on this type of flop if I'm going to call his 3-bet pre.

The turn then comes a blank and he puts me all in, I'm getting roughly 2-1 so only need about 33% equity vs his range however his line looks pretty strong. Although he may fire misses on the flop it's unlikely he would follow up and put me in with just A high. So am I likely running into TT+ if I call or would he make this move with a wider range...?

Thanks for the help.

Oliver


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Last edited by Croyd93; Thu Sep 06, 2012 at 09:49 AM..
 
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Thu Sep 06, 2012, 09:45 AM
(#2)
craig121212's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 246
I think you may have put the wrong replayer link in, this one is AQs in the bb.
 
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Thu Sep 06, 2012, 12:36 PM
(#3)
Croyd93's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 639
Cheers Craig, I've change it now


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Thu Sep 06, 2012, 12:42 PM
(#4)
craig121212's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 246
I think I would fold here, this looks ridiculously strong, it looks like he wants all the money in now. I think a pp.

There's a flush draw, and a straight draw out there, and the turn just gave one of the straight draws more outs. Looks like he wants the money in and to charge for drawing out on him, rather than seeing a scare card and you moving all in.

However, preflop I wouldn't flat in position with JJ, you have a strong hand and your in position, build the pot, 3bet.
 
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Thu Sep 06, 2012, 08:20 PM
(#5)
GarethC23's Avatar
Since: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,273
I like the way you played this hand so far Oliver. Really this is the reason we need reads on our opponents, whether by their country of origin, a headsup display, how many tables they are playing, their screenname, whatever we can use.

Let's take a look at some ranges


Board: 9d 8c 5c 3s
Dead:

equity win tie pots won pots tied
Hand 0: 29.765% 28.15% 01.61% 384 22.00 { JdJh }
Hand 1: 70.235% 68.62% 01.61% 936 22.00 { 99+, AcKc, AcQc, AcJc }


Against this range we are definitely not getting the right price. If we are playing against a standard opponent who takes this line, I would assume his range looks pretty close to this. But there are plenty of players who have tighter ranges, and players who have much much wider ones as well.

He has gone to some length to represent strength, re-raising preflop and committing his entire stack. So don't worry about something like "I called flop so I have to call the turn." We are either getting the right price against his range or we aren't. He can continuation bet a much wider range than the range he is likely to shove all-in on the turn with.

The short answer is, it depends, and that's unfortunately also the long answer! Sometimes in 6-max cash there are going to be spots like this and that's when we need more information to have a better idea of what to do.

 

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