Home / Community / Forum / Poker Education / Texas Hold'Em Cash Games /

5/2c NL TH Jd9d, betting

Old
Default
5/2c NL TH Jd9d, betting - Wed Sep 26, 2012, 08:49 AM
(#1)
Takamino's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 5
Villian unknown

Did I bet OK in this? I am a novice and thus trying to play tight and aggressive, however I am worried that I still need to be more conservative when reading good draws. I play about 20% of hands, so when I play I tend to make large bets and raises, I then fee it difficult of pulling out of a pot as I have invested a fair bit on each betting round. Can you offer me any advice specifically relating to this hand?

Many thanks,

Matthew

 
Old
Default
Wed Sep 26, 2012, 09:56 AM
(#2)
topthecat's Avatar
Since: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,962
Hi Matthew,

It has been a while since I posted anything meaningful but having seen this thread with someone obviously looking to learn I have decided to give you some advice.

Firstly, a question, is this Zoom or normal speed 5NL? I will assume normal speed.

To the hand itself: J9 of diamonds is a speculative hand and from early to mid position is an instant fold

At least you opened for a raise and did not limp, but a min raise looks very fishy to any regulars playing. Also the fact you are short stacked immediately labels you a "fish" to regular players.

The villain puts in a small 3bet pre flop and calling basically tells him your hand is not super strong.

You flop the flush and the villain leads into for about a third of the pot, on such a coordinated board that usually means he has a part of it. Your reraise is too small and gives him the odds to call. You probably are worried about a higher flush or flush draw at this point but the bet has to be bigger. On this depth of money I am probably shoving here.

He calls and the turn pairs the board meaning if he is holding pocket 8s or 5s the house just got there. He bets 25 cents and at this point you have to decide whether he is bluffing or trying to induce. The raise to 50 cents gets your answer when he goes all in. You have to fold here but the fact is you should have folded at the start of the hand.

I make plays like this all the time even though I know it is wrong but if you want to win money at cash you have to be disciplined and chuck the rubbish away. Playing J9x out of position is not TAG play, it is LAG.

While I am here some other advice. unless you are just playing for fun and entertainment you should not be sitting down at these tables with a bankroll of less than $200. You should always buy in for the full 100 bb, which is $5.00.

Do not play with money you cannot afford to lose. If that means you cannot deposit then build a bankroll from the Leagues and freerolls. That may not sound like being a PokerStar, but if you can win there it will give you a grounding to win at min stakes, whether cash, MTT or SNGs.

Good luck and remember learn to walk before you can run.

Cheers,

TC

Last edited by topthecat; Wed Sep 26, 2012 at 09:58 AM..
 
Old
Default
Wed Sep 26, 2012, 12:00 PM
(#3)
Takamino's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 5
Hi TC,

Thanks for that. This was a 'fast' game, which I assume is normal speed.

Having just started I am finding it hard to adjust my 'standing' as each round progresses, and gauge which positions I can play speculative or just 'monster'/strong hands. I thought the J9d was a stronger hand than it was initially.

I also now see that if I had made a much bigger raise post-flop I may have scared him out of the pot.

Thanks.

The money I am playing with at the moment is just money I won on a free entry tournament. I still don't really know my way around the PokerStars app but I will look at the leagues etc.. too

Thanks for your comment and advice.

Matthew
 
Old
Default
Wed Sep 26, 2012, 11:13 PM
(#4)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,487
(Head Trainer)
Hi Matthew,

I too think this is a fold preflop from this position... I don't mind opening it another spot or two back, so it's close, but if you're new to poker initially it's better to fold these spots, as they will lead to more tricky post flop situations. After you get some experience under your belt and some more comfort level with the basics, then look to expand your starting hand ranges in middle or late position and open some of this hand strength type when folded to.

I definitely like raising the flop, the villain will have a lot of overpairs (with or without a diamond) and a lot of big aces with a single big diamond that he will give action with. Raise sizing could be a bit more, .30-.35c would be my preference, simply because he'll pay that with this range, and it leaves him room to reraise all in on a semi-bluff if he's got a single big diamond.

I don't mind getting all in when the board pairs, it's a small group of card combos that are beating us but I think he does this as well with all his big pairs "to protect" against a flush draw, and especially with big pairs+a flush card. If we had reason to believe he would only stack off with a full house or nut flush then we should fold at this point for sure, just not thinking that's the case without specific reads vs. a random 2nl player.

Bottom line though, TC is right, just fold this pre. Start opening hands like this from late position after you've gotten some practice and comfort with the basics and are looking to expand your hand ranges.

Dave


Head Live Trainer
Check out my Videos

4 Time Bracelet Winner



 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com