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10NL 6 Max Slowplay spot?

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10NL 6 Max Slowplay spot? - Fri Sep 28, 2012, 01:39 AM
(#1)
TheAwesomeNW's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 474


Villain was 32/21, AF 1.9, flop Cbet: 63% (27), turn Cbet: 50% (4), after 413 hands

I was thinking that on the flop after he reraised me to $5.50, he most likely hold a Queen thus I raised him again, wanting to get it in.

Are calling his raise and reraising both ok? Or will you prefer one of them?
 
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Fri Sep 28, 2012, 02:43 AM
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TheAwesomeNW's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 474
My reasons for fastplaying: When he reraised me, it's most likely he held a Queen. 2 scenarios, he had either Weak Kicker or Strong Kicker.

SK: He would have gotten all in on the flop. If I called, any turn card especially Ace, King, Jack, Ten would have killed the action as he would worry I turn boat.

WK: He might get it all in on the flop. Slow playing is when we can afford to let villain improve his hand, but in this case, if he improves, we are beat. However, it's unlikely he will improve as he has only 3 outs, 6%.
Any turn cards will be a scare card for him as well. If he doesn't want to get it all in on the flop, he also will not on the turn. We're just freerolling him, though it's only a 6%. If he checks the turn, he may spike it on the river.

Your thoughts about this?
 
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Fri Sep 28, 2012, 10:50 AM
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GarethC23's Avatar
Since: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,273
Hey Awesome, awesome flop

I think the play here is to move all-in. I actually don't think the distinction between strong kicker and weak kicker is going to be that helpful to us here. For one, what about medium kicker? Kicker's don't all of a sudden stop being strong and become weak . This quibble aside, if someone puts that raise into the pot on the flop with a queen of any variety, I expect them to go with it, that is to call off when you move all-in.

The real potential merit to calling would be allowing our opponent to continue to bluff. We already know we are going to be getting maximum value from his value hands, but we could be increasing our value from his bluffs.

I don't really expect our opponent to continue to bluff though, if he is bluffing. He's already had quite the go at it! If he is overplaying a hand like KK or AA, I wouldn't expect him to stop overplaying it either and give up on the pot should we move all-in.

So for that reason I think moving all-in now is going to be your best bet. Like you note, we can get it all-in with a queen now before one potentially turns us and we get the remaining money in drawing to one out. When possible, we'd prefer to get the most money in when crushing and the least money in when crushed.

I would also like to see you check-raise a bit smaller. Something like 1.70 is probably a good size. This is a size that we could certainly be bluffing with given the paired nature of the board. This is a board that doesn't hit a lot of hands and is therefore one suitable for a check-raise bluff. But for our check-raise to be a plausible bluff I think we should be making it smaller. The size you chose really looks like you just want to put a ton of money into the pot
 
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Fri Sep 28, 2012, 09:31 PM
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TheAwesomeNW's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 474
Haha yea Gareth, check-raising smaller would be optimal. I was too anxious to get the money in. I was just thinking that if he held AQ, he would be more likely to stack off, compared to holding QT, he might pull last minute handbrake, thinking I had a better kicker in the BB.

Result was that he folded after I raised to $12.30. I'm not sure if he was capable bluffing me with his $5.50 reraise based on his stats. On the other hand, he could have Qx, weak kicker, and decided to make the hero fold. I guess we have to ask him personally for the answer. Gareth what's your opinion on him folding?

Last edited by TheAwesomeNW; Fri Sep 28, 2012 at 09:40 PM..
 

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