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Hand #2 vs Villain2

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Hand #2 vs Villain2 - Thu Oct 18, 2012, 05:43 AM
(#1)
rule110's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 147
the marbles roll uphill in marmalade

Last edited by rule110; Tue Oct 23, 2012 at 06:11 AM..
 
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Thu Oct 18, 2012, 07:23 AM
(#2)
Kedan87's Avatar
Since: May 2012
Posts: 74
Firstly I've seen you've posted a few hands against this villain so well done for spotting his a weak player and attacking him.

Q6s is about 52% favourite against ATC, so yes you are slightly ahead, but with the blinds still to act behind you and without any other reads I would tend to just fold preflop and wait for a better spot. That being said, if the blinds are playing very tight and you know they will fold to a raise then it could be worth a go at isolating the limper and outplaying him preflop. Just make sure you have a plan, from the first hand you posted this guy seem to be more on the side of a calling station, therefore you want to be value betting him all day long, for that reason I'm not overly happy with Q6s as I'm only 52% to his 48% of winning this hand. If I had a read that said he would fold on the flop to a cbet if he missed then I would play this like you did by isolating him.

The flop gives you the flush, and we have him marked as a calling station, so this is perfect for you to make some money. Your looking to bet all three streets and getting your stack in if possible. If he re-raises you at any point, or another spade comes out, then you need to rethink your plan and slow down the betting, maybe even fold. So on that flop with him a calling station I would be betting at least 3/4 pot, maybe even a pot bet if I think he will call. Also this is where planning your bets for future streets comes into play, and personally I struggle with this on the felt. If you bet 3/4 like you did, your left with $0.94 with a pot of $0.58, so a turn bet for another 3/4 is more than a 3rd of your stack, so you should be going all-in, but an all-in of £0.94 into a pot of $0.58 looks very strong. If on the other hand you made a pot bet on the flop, the pot would be $0.69 turn with $0.88 left in you stack, which if you shoved looks a lot less scary than the previous shove.

That being said you still managed to get him all in and priced him out of his draws, the only problem is a thinking player would see your turn bet as affectively an all-in, therefore they should only be folding or going all-in. So that’s something to think about when play better players.

The showdown proved are read of him being a calling station as he couldn’t fold his nut flush draw, and even called the river bet with A high. I hope you picked up on this and made a note never to bluff this guy as he very rarely folding his cards.

Nice win
 
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Thu Oct 18, 2012, 08:41 AM
(#3)
rule110's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 147
i eated to marmalde

Last edited by rule110; Tue Oct 23, 2012 at 06:11 AM..
 
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Fri Oct 19, 2012, 12:34 PM
(#4)
GarethC23's Avatar
Since: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,273
Hey Rule101

I don't know if you have noticed in this hand your biggest mistake: not having topped up your stack to 100bb. Your opponent is supposedly a big mark. Look at all the money he has in front of him!

If you could win more money from him, you should. And you could. You could top your stack up to 100bb and that would afford you to win 100bb in a hand like this as opposed to the 60 or so that you did end up winning.

I think this isolation is pretty loose and pretty ambitious. You flopped a flush and that's great -- that's not going to happen very often. It is pretty easy to value bet your flush on every street but things are going to be tougher on a lot of different boards.

The biggest thing to take away from this hand though is that you could have won even more had you simply topped up your stack before the hand.
 

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