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5nl 6max zoom - AQ with a 9TJ flop with flush draw - CBET? Pt 2

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5nl 6max zoom - AQ with a 9TJds flop - CBET? Pt 2 - Fri Nov 02, 2012, 04:43 PM
(#1)
TrustySam's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 8,291
BronzeStar
EDIT: Tried changing the title, but it wouldn't change - I didn't have a flush draw ...


I wanted to add this hand to the other thread, but since we're only supposed to post one hand per thread, I guess I'll ask how my value betting was ... still too small?



My equity :/ :

Hero shows (Straight, Queen High) (Pre 59%, Flop 30%, Turn 88%)
UTG mucks (Two Pair, Jacks and Tens) (Pre 41%, Flop 70%, Turn 13%)


First Hand: http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/for...draw-CBET-Pt-1

Last edited by TrustySam; Fri Nov 02, 2012 at 08:54 PM.. Reason: Villain's hand wasn't showing ...
 
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Sat Nov 03, 2012, 06:21 PM
(#2)
GarethC23's Avatar
Since: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,273
Hey TrustySam

I think betting the turn a shade bigger is reasonable. I think your river bet is fine fwiw.

I think on the turn our opponent can talk himself/herself into a lot of calls with marginal holdings, not just 2p but also one pair hands and flush draws, gut shots, etc. We definitely have an incentive to get those hands to the river so we shouldn't bet too much bigger than this size, maybe just a little.

On the river we need to get calls from worse and this is a scary board that we've bet every street. I like your 1/2p sizing here because of that. If our opponent is going to call a size w AJ it will be for this amount.

On the flop we should consider checking back. Let's think about his limping range, how well does it connect with this flop? Pretty well I think! Some of the hands like 22-66 we can get to fold at any time by betting. But a lot of hands aren't going to fold. It is close but against some players checking back is going to be a bit better than betting. Remember we aren't guaranteed to hit our draw. If our opponent's calling range is a favourite against our hand here then maybe we would benefit from deceptive check back.

 
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Sat Nov 03, 2012, 09:21 PM
(#3)
TrustySam's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 8,291
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Okay, that sounds really good

I guess it's like what you were saying in live training about thinking about hands that might still be willing to call?


The first year I played, I used to get so excited to make a hand, and would just value bet when I got one, and would hope that it was good.

The second year, after doing ^^^ and getting beat over and over again for not being aware enough of hands that I was behind, I started to get really preoccupied with those 'action flops' and trying to figure out when my strong hands were really second best.

And it seems like maybe that's pretty common for peoples' attention to go towards big losses?


I guess I just never thought to look for extra value out of the hands I was already winning? Or didn't know what to do to improve? Like that's maybe a whole different mindset from just value-betting strong hands like you said - there's more to it in ranging to try to find second best hands the opponent might be holding that might be willing to call bigger raises?

I had two flush over flushes a couple of weeks ago during my 'heater' and only managed to get about 50bb's on by the river for both - I guess next time I'll know how better to play those suited/connected flops


Thx Gareth!!
 
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Sat Nov 03, 2012, 09:23 PM
(#4)
TrustySam's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 8,291
BronzeStar
note to self

LESSON: Suited connected 'action' flops are terrible for semi-bluffing, but they're fantastic for value betting - if you flop strong, "[do] not let up on the gas" ... no slowplay!!!
 

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