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Hand evaluation requires - Sun Dec 09, 2012, 01:14 PM
(#1)
kk2106's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 8
So had been running good in most of the 180m sng that I played today so decided to give a shot to 60$ 180m sng though i must admit that the buy in was a lil over what my bankroll permits.. Anyways was running good in this tourney too for the most part but did a couple of blunders back to back and all of a sudden from 3rd place i found myself on 38th place with 42 players remainin..
Not sure if this was one of the blunders i made or it was one of those coolers... Not much information on SB and BB....
Suggestions??

 
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Sun Dec 09, 2012, 01:31 PM
(#2)
kk2106's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 8
Ok here's another 1 that just happened.. 8$ 180m sng final table.. Decided to take a flip for a shot at winning the tourney.. Was my call correct or should I've waited for a better spot?? For some reason I'd put him on exactly the kind of hand that he had or some small pair..
I'd really appreciate a detailed analysis coz i feel that I need to really improve my late stage game...
Thanx in advance..

 
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Sun Dec 09, 2012, 01:38 PM
(#3)
Cairn Destop's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,477
BronzeStar
My thought is that a two-gap straight and flush possibility warranted a play, but not an all-in push. I would have gone for a limp since the only players in the hand are the blinds. If the BB pushed all-in, you had a chance to bail without much damage done. If both called the BB, you could have bailed after the flop since you hit nothing to help your hand.

Once the flop hit, you were behind. If he bet, your best possibility was trips through high pair. To do that, you had to hit either or both of the remaining streets. You hit neither one.

I'm thinking this a case of you trying to bully with the idea that the blinds had nothing worth calling an all-in. Now we don't know the SB's hand, but I think his calling your bet was a bad call too. He pushed because he had the ace, no other reason. Good to remember if you ever come across him again.

But the real question might be to ask yourself why did you go to the next level. If you were having success in the lower level and wanted to try the next one up, consider the loss a good learning experience. If you went for the higher level feeling invulnerable due to your current success, you were treading where angels fear to go.

Players stress BR management for a reason. At this level, you admitted to a lot of pressure. This means you were playing in a must-win mode. That is a formula for disaster whenever the cards are less than stellar.




My chip's worth of comments.
 
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Sun Dec 09, 2012, 01:46 PM
(#4)
Cairn Destop's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,477
BronzeStar
Okay, did not see that second hand at the time of my prior posting, which shows how fast I am typing.


Again, I'm thinking you a bit over aggressive. I know that seems to be the current trend, but I'm thinking such play can expose you to this result from somebody willing to call with an ace plus hand.

A slower approach might have saved you since your opponent would have bet when the ace hit the board. At that point, you had nothing. I am guessing the advice would center around betting three times the blind. I might try more caution when I'm playing an open-ended straight.

8 outs = 32% chance. Worth playing with caution.
 
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Sun Dec 09, 2012, 02:18 PM
(#5)
wiltshireman's Avatar
Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,572
(Moderator)
*****Moved******


Moderator
 
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Sun Dec 09, 2012, 06:39 PM
(#6)
ChewMe1's Avatar
Since: Jan 2012
Posts: 574
Hey kk2106

Hand 1....

In a turbo format this shove is fine. The big blind has 12 BB's and the SB has 2 BB's. Easy shove with the Q9s, just unfortunate.

Hand 2...

Now this is close.

Although we have the UTG player's hand beaten a lot of the time I still think folding is best. If we fold we still have enough fold equity to shove the next hand or too profitably.

It is a close spot and I think our decision boils down too if the UTG shover is a reg or not. Regular's will be shoving wide enough to make our call with QK +ev. Weak/tight players won't be shoving wide enough to make this +ev imo.

Nice hands, Chris.
 

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