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2NL 6 Max - Call into 3Bet vs LAG OOP and Turn Straight

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2NL 6 Max - Call into 3Bet vs LAG OOP and Turn Straight - Sat Apr 06, 2013, 01:44 AM
(#1)
Low Rated's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 114
Hello everyone.

I finally figured out how to show the hand to a certain point




Call pre flop was definitely a little loose but this guy was raising/3 Betting way too often and this bet was pretty light so why not.

I'm ranging him on a low PP/weak Ax suited/Kx. Flop comes and i get the open ended nut straight draw on a wet board. He C Bets/donk bets often so I check to him hoping to draw for cheap. He bets and I call.

I make the nut straight (whew) and now I'm looking to get everything he has, how should I get his money in on this turn card? The flush draw maybe a relevant threat that could be very costly. I take the risk and check to him, any thoughts?
 
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Sat Apr 06, 2013, 10:06 AM
(#2)
ArtySmokesPS's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,346
Hi Low Rated,

Opening QJo UTG ssems a little loose to me, but I'm primarily a full ring player, so maybe it's standard for 6max. I don't really like calling the 3-bet, even though it's a minraise. Calling 3-bets out of position with marginal hands (or even hands as strong as TT or AK) is a huge leak, because you'll miss the flop 70% of the time and have to fold to a c-bet. An aggressive opponent will make life hell for you when he's in position.
Here you call and the flop is KT3, giving you an OESD. Villain bets and you call. I might go for the check-raise here, repping a set of tens, folding out some hands that beat you, while also having decent equity when called. I don't want to get re-raised, though, and villain can definitely have TT, KK or AA, so calling is OK when the price is fine.
You make the nut straight on the turn, and checking is standard here, because donking out kind of turns your hand face up, and villain is likely to barrel with most of his range anyway. There are two flush draws out there, and villain may have improved his hand to two pair or top set. If he makes a large bet, he's pretty much committed. e.g. If he bets 62c into 75c, he has $2 left. I'd put him all in, expecting to be called by all sets, two pairs, flush draw + pair, and probably AQ/AJ too, as they will have TP + gutter.
Villain obviously has the option to check behind with his marginal holdings (Kx) and draws, which is annoying, because quite a lot of river cards will either kill your action (a queen, jack, diamond, or club may mean villain is never calling the river with a hand you beat) or improve villain to a better hand.

This is why calling the 3-bet OOP was a mistake. It puts you in spots where it's hard to get value unless villain has a very strong hand, or a draw to one that beats you. So if he bets, get it in now. If he checks the turn, about half of river cards are "bad" for you, but you can obviously lead the good ones for value.

Cheers,
Arty


Bracelet Winner

Last edited by ArtySmokesPS; Sat Apr 06, 2013 at 10:09 AM.. Reason: typo
 
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Sat Apr 06, 2013, 12:42 PM
(#3)
Low Rated's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 114
Hey.

Idk if opening w/ QJo UTG is loose in 6 max but I've always felt comfortable doing it, even QT suited. I'd never do this in a FR game though. I agree with what you said about calling into the 3 bet OOP with it though. I should have 4Bet and took the initiative (since he was more than likely to be playing weak holdings) and donk bet a Axx/Kxx/Qxx flop, all I did was leave myself vunerable to a CBet.

After I checked on the turn he made an almost pot sized bet so he was comitted and I came over the top and put him all in. He called and as it turns out he had Ad6d for the TPFD. The river came a blank and I pocketed a cool $6 pot.

Everything worked out in my favor but I couldn't let myself get too happy about it since I felt I misplayed. I'm going to look for some guidelines for opening ranges in 6 max, I don't want to be leaking chips when I decide to move up the stakes. Thanks Arty
 

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