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wpf Day II--Survival

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wpf Day II--Survival - Sun Nov 24, 2002, 01:32 PM
(#1)
Deleted user
(Sorry for the delay, things have been pretty busy here
since I got back)


...So I sit down for Day II with renewed energy, but I know
I need a lot of help to get anywhere. Gatorhb has posted
most of the significant hands elsewhere, so I'm not going
to repeat them here. In fact this post is going to consist
of random notes and observations, not always even in the
right order.

STYLIN'

I did "make my move" from early position with a J9 and
got called by AK. I had a very short stack and the blinds
were coming up. I got lucky and hit a 9 on the turn and
a J on the river. This was the worst hand I showed for
the whole tournament.
I think the J9 helped even more than just winning that
pot. A little while later, when I had built up a few more
chips (after Hellumth made his big laydown), I called
with AhTh with several others in the pot. The flop was
Axx with two hearts, and I moved all in, wanting to
win it right there but having a pretty good draw if
someone called with a bigger A. The next player
hesitated a long time before folding, and the last
player hesitated a long time and then....called!
with some piece of cheese that couldn't even beat
my A!!! He thought I was stealing. I believe he never
would have made that bad read if he hadn't seen me
go all-in with J9!!

A word about the play in general in this tournament.
There was a lot more checking, and a lot more
calling than I would have expected. It seems like
even the aggressive players were often willing to
call a bet and see what came on the flop rather
than try to blow the original raiser off the pot. I don't
know if it was that there were so MANY of the top
players playing against each other or what, but there
were really no bullies.
Also, the well known players were not protected by
any special magic. I believe there are many PSO
players who will be able to hold their own with bracelet
winners. You just have to get out there and do it!

YOUNG TURKS

Speaking of styles... McEvoy recently wrote an article in
CardPlayer where he talks about a new breed of
superaggressive players. He puts both Phillip Ivey and
Layne Flack in this group. From what I saw, these players'
styles are like night and day! Layne Flack was the closest
thing we had to a maniac, making (seemingly) wild bets
while laughing, joking, moving about the room, talking
non-stop. Ivey never got up, hardly ever spoke, and seemed
to just make the right bets in the right places. When he
got a big stack, he bet and raised frequently, but it always
seemed reasonable, and he would quietly throw his hand in
if there was a re-raise. The only thing these two seem to
have in common is they are on the money list in a lot of
tournaments! It MAY be that their play is similiar, but their
presentation is so different that it looks like they are
playing different games.

THE OTHER PHIL

Funny to think of Phil Hellmuth as part of the "Old Guard"
but there seem to be a lot of young players coming up
behind him. The thing that I noticed first about Hellmuth,
and then throughout and even after the tournament, was
his love of the game. He was having FUN! He loved being
in tough positions where he had to think, like he was working
on a puzzle. There were no antics, no bad behavior, just
a clear passion for the game.

THIRSTY IN THE DESERT

I managed to build my chips up to about 53,000 after a
sensational hand where Layne Flack mis-read me and
called my all-in bet when i flopped an A with AK and he
had a smaller Ace. He was a little quieter for a few minutes
after that, but not for long!!
After that high point my chips slowly dwindled. We were at
about 28 players at that point, and for most of us the game
slowed down considerabley. I was still willing to go for all
the marbles if i got the opportunity, but it just didn't come.
So I enjoyed sitting at a table with Kathy Liebert, Amarillo
Slim, and Layne Flack and just watching for awhile. In
one hand, Slim pushes in a bunch of chips against Kathy
and says, "Only women and children give up, and I'm neither
one of those." Kathy gives up...only to have Slim flip up his
cards and show he was on a bluff...

During one of the breaks Slim is being interviewd. He is asked
if there is an "image" he is striving for when he first sits
down to play. He says, "I don't care what the hell anybody
thinks about me." Then pauses and adds, "But I do want them
to feel like they're in the electric chair and I'm about to
throw the switch!"

When we get to 14 players we really hit a wall. We don't lose
another player for almost an entire 90 minute round. I am
stealing just enough in blinds to stay alive. We get to 13 and
go on break. I look around and see only two other stacks
as small as mine. Talk about bubble anxiety! 11th place
pays nothing. 10th place pays $17,000...

The was a thread recently about the different philosophies
regarding essentially going on P/F to make the bottom of
the money list or playing aggressively to give yourself a
chance at top three. At PSO I never play for 10th place. If
I think I have the best hand, or have a shot at stealing, I
will try to take some chips. But when we got down to 12
players and it appeared there were 2 who could go out
before me, I realized that in this specific event, I wanted
to make the final table! (We played 10 at the final table
instead of the 9 we had been playing, complete with
redraw for seats and button and a move to another room
which was better for spectators).
When it got to 11, there were two players who were about
to be blinded off. I really think I might have put down AA
just to assure finishing in that elite group! Maybe I'll
never do it again. I certainly opened it up as soon as we
started final table play. But then again, the money jumps
after getting to the final table were not really significant
until you reached the final six.

My last hand went down like this: I am small stack with 23k.
Phillip Ivey makes a
moderate raise, as he often does. I go all-in with AT and
he calls without hesitation, showing AK. I stand up, ready
to congratulate him. The flop is ATx!! Elation! The turn
is a blank... I can win this thing! The river is a K...

oh...

That means I have to go home now, right?

Well, not quite. I go into a private room where I am given
202 $100 bills. I don't know what else to do so I peel off
a tip for the dealers, say "thanks" (which may have sounded
more like "yikes!"), and walk out.

The experience was incredible. The support from PSO was
incredible.

Having gatorhb there watching, taking notes and
giving constant encouragement was a key ingredient to my
success. Meeting and talking with this amazing woman will
have a greater impact on my life than playing in the
tournament did...

I may post more little observations about some of the players
in the general forum as i think of them. If there are specific
questions from those of you who were following the action
via the on the spot reports, I will be happy to answer...
...aloha
 
Old
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Sun Nov 24, 2002, 03:01 PM
(#2)
Deleted user
great report huk, i only have one question. you said you were small stack with 23k at final table, what were the blinds when you busted out? and once again, excellent job, congratulations!!!!!!

jmuzzey lsogc
 
Old
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Re: wpf Day II--Survival - Sun Nov 24, 2002, 07:47 PM
(#3)
Deleted user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hukilau
A word about the play in general in this tournament.
There was a lot more checking, and a lot more
calling than I would have expected. It seems like
even the aggressive players were often willing to
call a bet and see what came on the flop rather
than try to blow the original raiser off the pot.
How deep was the money during this? What proportion of the stacks was the total bet size of a typical raise?

Thanks.

Quote:
The was a thread recently about the different philosophies
regarding essentially going on P/F to make the bottom of
the money list or playing aggressively to give yourself a
chance at top three. At PSO I never play for 10th place. If
I think I have the best hand, or have a shot at stealing, I
will try to take some chips. But when we got down to 12
players and it appeared there were 2 who could go out
before me, I realized that in this specific event, I wanted
to make the final table!
lol, I don't blame you. Usually, I have the aggressive, go for top 3, attitude, but sometimes the stack is so small that surviving into the money is the correct thing to do. Your stack in this situation probably meant that the play for top 3 attitude would usually be right, but the thrill of making the final table was enough to make your survive attitude a good exception in this spot. The sacrifice of a little EV was more than compensated by getting to final table I think.

Nice report.
 
Old
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Mon Nov 25, 2002, 08:12 PM
(#4)
Deleted user
Thx for the report Huk.

Randy
 
Old
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Tue Nov 26, 2002, 10:37 AM
(#5)
Deleted user
Great report Huk. Appreciate all the insights into the other players and your thinking during the various stages of the tourney.

We are all very proud of you, and hopefully you and Depraved will lead to an avalanche of in-the-money finishes in major tourneys!

Tim
 

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