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2NL - 6 Max - TJc

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2NL - 6 Max - TJc - Sat May 25, 2013, 07:37 AM
(#1)
Gronkh 94's Avatar
Since: Aug 2012
Posts: 39
Hello,

Today I played some cash games on 1/2c. So I lost a strange hand, do I did something wrong?

http://www.boomplayer.com/ro/poker-h...623_0015C3FD63

Last edited by Gronkh 94; Sat May 25, 2013 at 07:54 AM..
 
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Sat May 25, 2013, 10:51 AM
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ArtySmokesPS's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,347
Hi Gronkh!

What you did "wrong" here was to hugely overvalue the strength of your hand, and you value-owned yourself by building a big pot with a marginal hand.
When the player in the CO limps, you can either iso-raise or just over-limp, as you have one of the best speculative hands that plays great in position. If the limper tends to fold to raises, then I'd raise, but most of the time I'd actually just over-limp, to keep the pot small, and hopefully see a flop multiway, with great implied odds if I hit a big draw. (I'd rather have a draw with JTs, than make a pair, because one pair is not a hand I want to play for stacks with).
As played, you raise to 8c and the big blind calls. His range can be quite wide, as he may have been expecting the limper to also call, so various suited connectors, suited aces and pocket pairs are in his range.
The flop comes T22 with a flush draw, so you made top pair, jack kicker. This is a fairly dry flop. Villain can't call with many hands. If he has A2s or Tx he's obviously sticking around. Flush draws will call a bet too. I think most underpairs will call one bet too, as this board is not very scary, and you'd be c-betting with your entire range, so a hand like 88 would often be ahead of your AK, for example.

Your bet size is too big for this situation. On dry flops that villain is likely to have missed, you should be smaller. Something like 60% of pot is ideal. You bet full pot, and that would mean that many weaker hands will fold. Villain actually calls. Alarm bells should start ringing here. Villain can definitely have a deuce with A2s. He can also have hands like QTs/KTs. Worse tens like T9s are also in the pot and you beat those, and hands like 99-77 probably called too, along with flush draws.
The turn comes an 8. This doesn't change much. The only hand it improves is 88, but that's a definite possibility for villain. At this point, I would exercise some pot control, because this is a textbook way ahead/way behind spot. If villain has trips, a boat, or a better 10, you're crushed. You're only beating flush draws and underpairs, but those hands are probably not calling another big bet. With one pair, marginal kicker, you should not be going for three streets of value. I'd be checking here even with TPTK, as checking behind also means I'm more likely to get looked up on the river by worse hands.
Potting the turn is where you get value-owned. Ask yourself the question: "What hands do you beat that will call a pot-sized bet?" If the roles were reversed, would you be calling the turn with 77?
Since there are almost no worse hands that call this bet, it's a bad value-bet. Villain is only continuing with hands that beat you!
The river comes a king and you pot it again, putting villain all in. Again, what worse hands are calling? Even if villain called the turn with a hand like KQss, he just made a better pair than yours. It's basically impossible for a worse hand than JT to call this bet. Villain snap-calls with trips and you lost a huge pot.

I'm afraid to say that the way you played this hand post-flop was really spewy. You played the hand like you had the nuts, when you actually had one pair, average kicker. In future, try and put villain on a range of hands, and try and keep the pot small with one pair. Exercise some pot control, so you can get to showdown relatively cheaply. If you're in a way ahead/way behind situation, don't keep betting so big, as that will make it so that you're never getting called by worse.

Hope this help!
Cheers,
Arty


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