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Newcomer/Mentor Program?

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Newcomer/Mentor Program? - Tue Jun 11, 2013, 04:33 PM
(#1)
DrEllenCait's Avatar
Since: Jan 2013
Posts: 125
BronzeStar
Ode to a Mentor

When I first came on to PSO with little to no experience with poker, I worked hard on the Basic Poker course and religiously attended live training sessions I still do and recommend to all PSO players as we are blessed with a bevy of great trainers. .But I knew I needed help beyond when I heard things like flatlined and assumed someone had died at the table given in medical terms, it means brain and/or heat death; when aggressive villian or 'having the nuts' suggested a referral to someone like me; and when I asked a trainer during a session why there was a split pot when one player held a straight flush in spades and the other held the same but in clubs. Afterall, I knew from bridge that there is a hierarchy with spades beating hearts, which beat diamonds, leaving the lonely clubs as lowest ranking. While I conveniently chosen to forget who the trainer was, naturally he hadn't a clue what I was talking about.

So I knew I wasn't ready for a private teacher (I now work with Dave, 'The Langolier', whom we all know to be terrific as he is so respectful of all, and teaches with such wisdom and clarity) so I turned to the bridge model on its largest site where I typically teach: in the 'Beginner Intermediate Lounge', newcomers are invited to have a mentor who is typically a more knoledgable member of the club. The newcomer can expect a full tour of the site, how the different functions work (chatting privately, paying for particular games, etc.,) and the bare basics of the game. Teachers, such as myself then take over with free classes for players of different levels. (You could google my name, Ellen Caitlin Pomer for more info on that facet of my life.) So I announced at a training session that if someone had an hour a week or so to mentor me, I would be very appreciative. Lo & behold, Lane Anderson (85FastLane) has been mentoring me since and well beyond the call of duty. As I studied for different course quizzes, if I had questions, he was there; he and I often play SitN'Goes and after we discuss hands which often mirror the work I am doing with Dave (while I am working on Lane to play Zoom!), and recently he gave me a wonderful first lesson on the HUD PT4. Through the process, from one end of Canada to another, we have become friends and what a lovely bonus.

While no such formal program of newcomer/mentor exists in the PSO, I wonder if working say with Paul (RoyalRaise5 we might start such a program with teachers asking if there were newcomers in classes while we develop a list of names and available times. It is always good to give back, a value to be be integrated in our game and God knows, a tour of PSO and Poker Stars, help in finding places to learn the lingo, questions about course material, about live training could be invaluable to a newcomer.

So members of PSO and trainers, what do you think?
 
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Tue Jun 11, 2013, 04:45 PM
(#2)
royalraise85's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 26,019
(Community Coordinator)
Well,

For the absolute beginner we have the Bankroll Builder promotion.

For existing players we do mentor them in a way via our free live training sessions and we have hand analysers here 24/7 to anlayse your hands and answer any poker related questions members may have.

Moderators are also on hand to help you with your general PokerStars questions and help players navigate the client etc.

But we are always open to new suggestions. Please email any suggestions you may have to ideas@mypokerschoolonline.com

Cheers Ellen,

Raiser


Moderator

Bracelet Winner


 
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Hey Raiser:) - Wed Jun 12, 2013, 01:08 PM
(#3)
DrEllenCait's Avatar
Since: Jan 2013
Posts: 125
BronzeStar
I totally agree that PSO teachers are terrific in helping all, from newcomers on.However, they can't possibly be expected to give a detailed tour of all of Poker Stars. Just PSO, in itself, has such a wealth of invaluable information and I m still finding gems! Mentors should never replace teachers; that is, giving lessons; rather, their role should be in directing newcomers as to where they might find the info they desire For example support@pokerschoolonline is the best support program online in my experience.The model Lane (85FastLane) and I have goes beyond what I would expect or suggest a mentor take on. We have evolved into friends who are mutually supportive and I would hope we now learn from each other, although I always respect the experience he has which I don't.

If PSO folks respond positively to my suggestion, I will email ideas@ and I thank you for directing me.

Thanks!
DrEllen
 
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Wed Jun 12, 2013, 08:30 PM
(#4)
ArtySmokesPS's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,316
The various PSO Team members are already very busy with forum moderation, training sessions and hand analysis. As Royal says, there's a form of mentoring already going on in the Bankroll Builder forum. Newcomers are directed to training sessions and archived videos and can also ask general or specific questions in their own BRB threads. Vast resources of further information are at the disposal of PSO members who use the links at the top of this page.
Hand analysers make sure that no thread goes unanswered in the hand analysis forums (cash games HERE, tournament hands HERE, Omaha HERE). Trainers are also happy to answer relevant questions in their particular training feedback threads.
In a perfect world, every PSO member would have 1-to-1 contact with a PSO Team member, but there are many thousands of members and the number is growing all the time, so there simply isn't the time or resources to do this. Team members are nevertheless happy to point you in the right direction if anyone has specific questions about Pokerstars or poker in general. Other forum users can also help by answering questions that are posted in the forum.

One great way of improving your play is to get involved in a Skype study group, or a bankroll co-op, with players that are regs in the same games as you. These can be set up in the Community Meet Up part of the forum. Anyone specifically looking for a mentor could likely find one in that part of the forum.
Making friends on the forum is beneficial in a number of ways, so I definitely recommend you get more involved. Reading and posting blogs is also a great idea. I regularly correspond with a couple of PSO members that read my blog and want further advice.

Hope this helps!
Cheers,
Arty


Bracelet Winner

Last edited by ArtySmokesPS; Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 08:33 PM..
 
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Thanks Arty - Thu Jun 13, 2013, 06:34 PM
(#5)
DrEllenCait's Avatar
Since: Jan 2013
Posts: 125
BronzeStar


[SIZE="1"][SIZE="4"]You mention Community meetings, Skype Study Groups, neith of which I knew about. This is exactly why a thorough tour of available resources would be so useful. I have never had time to go through all the resources, go to live training, play, and work! And to go through an entire thread to find that one gem which would help me--I found nothing yet under Community meetings that was useful to me--is very time consuming. Maybe I just have not been around long enough to learn of these, but that could be averted with an initial tour. ??

Ellen
 
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Fri Jun 14, 2013, 01:57 AM
(#6)
bhoylegend's Avatar
Since: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,261
I think a buddy/mentor programme is a good idea and it doesn't need to be done by staff as such. It's not deep poker strategy talk but casual guidance.

I know that when people make a first post they get a welcome message. I'm thinking something along the lines of a PM'd 'Welcome Pack' with an offer of additional support. I could draw something up later as an idea. Of course they recipient would be made aware they don't have to do anything with it if they don't want to.
 

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