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NLHE 20/100 Blinds : Was all-in a good Idea?

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NLHE 20/100 Blinds : Was all-in a good Idea? - Tue Jul 16, 2013, 04:30 AM
(#1)
GauravJha's Avatar
Since: Jun 2013
Posts: 12
Dear Experts:

I am a new player and I want to request a hand analysis:

Did I bet it right?
Did I play is good?
Was all-in in the end was a good idea?



Additional Info:
1: If I had a flush on the turn, I wouldn't have went all-in.
2. I calculated odds and just called and check and found that there a very minute chance that anyone else could have a flush with Ace High.

Your advice would certainly help me.
G.J.
 
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Tue Jul 16, 2013, 04:31 AM
(#2)
GauravJha's Avatar
Since: Jun 2013
Posts: 12
Villian here is a loose passive player. So, reviewing that I went ahead for all-ins
 
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Tue Jul 16, 2013, 10:07 AM
(#3)
GamblingProp's Avatar
Since: Jan 2013
Posts: 714
First of all the minraise preflop is bad, either raise like 4x the big blind or call (I prefer calling).
Calling flop and turn seems fine although you might be drawing thin if someone has a bigger flush draw.
On the river you bet the pot which I find a mistake since you aren't getting called by much worse.
You might get called by an 8 or a lower flush, but that's pretty much everything that you beat.
I would prefer a check and if someone bet, an all in raise.
 
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Tue Jul 16, 2013, 01:03 PM
(#4)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,836
(Super-Moderator)
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Hi GauravJha!

With JTs from UTG+1, I get a limp in front of me. I need to muck this hand immediately preflop, as it is not a strong enough hand to make a standard raise, which is to 3BB+1BB for each limper (120). I do not want to raise less than this, as I can be giving the opps the correct odds to try to outdraw me.
If I was in late position and it folded to me, I'd be happy to make a standard raise with it, but NOT from early position with someone else already in the pot.

If I was in the hand (which I would NOT be), when I see that I flop a flush draw and it checks to me, I will check behind and hope to see a free turn card. I then get a bet and a call, so I need to see if I have the right odds to call. I need to put 90 chips into a pot that will be 639 (14.1%). I have 9 outs to my flush and from the rule of 4 and 2, each of my outs is worth 2% equity to the turn, so my hand is worth 18%. Since my hand equity is higher than my pot equity, I will call as it's a +EV call.

The turn puts 4 to a straight out there, and I will once again check and hope to see a free river card. The first opp now bets 210 that is called, so I need to see if calling here makes sense. I need to call 210 into a pot that will be 1269 (16.5%). I now have 12 outs (added the three non-club 8's), so my hand has 24% equity. Since my hand equity is higher, I will call the 210.

The river gives me a flush, but it pairs the board. This can be a big problem, as either opp could now have a full house and beat me. I want to make a value bet here and the key is the bet sizing. I'm going to size this bet at 1/2 pot (635). I do NOT want to bet more than 750, as a bet of 750 or more pot-commits me... which means that I cannot make this bet and would have to shove. I also don't want to size the bet too large, as I want to be able to get value from worse hands. If I bet too big, I will have all the worse hands fold and only be called/raised by hands that beat me.

If I had hit the flush earlier, I would want to make a standard value bet for a hand with 2 opps, which is 2/3 pot. I do not want to make too large of bets that will value-own me.. make only better hands call.
With what the other opps could have, it's much more than a minute chance that I can be beat here. Both a higher flush and a full house are available and it's lucky that one of the opps did not have one of them.

The big key with this hand... muck marginal hands preflop when out of position.

Hope this helps and good luck at the tables.

John (JWK24)


Super-Moderator



6 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Wed Jul 17, 2013, 10:44 AM
(#5)
GauravJha's Avatar
Since: Jun 2013
Posts: 12
Hi JWK24:

Very Thank. Indeed I was confused about it as well. Now you have cleared it that It was a bad Idea to enter the pot with JTs from EP. Thanks

Hi Gambling Prop!

I know that entering the pot with huge increase, but my hands were as good as trashed, so was hestitated. Well, a very thanks for replying

Regards,
G.J.
 
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Wed Jul 17, 2013, 10:51 AM
(#6)
GauravJha's Avatar
Since: Jun 2013
Posts: 12
Hi JWK24:

Sorry, I didn't put it in the above post. I have a query.

In The above reply you said about: "Commit me to the pot"

What does "committing to the pot" means?
Any online help source available online?
 
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Wed Jul 17, 2013, 12:19 PM
(#7)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,836
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
Being pot committed means that you have over 1/3 of your remaining chips into the pot. Once this happens in a cash tourney, I cannot ever fold.. so I need to go all-in.

I replied to your PM with a video of Dave's from the library on the subject.

John (JWK24)


Super-Moderator



6 Time Bracelet Winner


 

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