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Hu sng $1.50

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Hu sng $1.50 - Tue Jul 30, 2013, 09:22 PM
(#1)
Saturnation's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 159
Hi all,

Is anyone else playing these?

I got the urge a few days ago to try them out again. Something about the time of the year makes me yearn for them for some reason, as I did the same thing last year. Last year, I was struggling to break even, though I did benefit an *lot* from them whenever the table gets down to 3-4 players.

This year, so far, much better. Good start, won 11 of my first 14, including a one off shot at $3.50...

I tanked a bit after that only going 2 for the next 9. Reviewing my play, I realised I started to play differently after losing a few in a row and adjusted my winning play. After that, 4 of 5.

I have to say, I'm having a blast playing these, even when I lose a tough match, as long as I've played well, I'm happy.

Just looking for a place to talk strategy. I think I've got the basic down and am learning to adjust to my opponent. The one thing I've started to do the last few games, against a more passive opponent whose on a short stack (about <15BB) I start shoving them with hands I'd call their shove with.

This seems to work amazingly well, as I look stronger than I am but am no worse off then if they had shoved into me. I got one so frustrated then called with something like 47 sooted .


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Thu Aug 01, 2013, 07:54 PM
(#2)
raccy's Avatar
Since: May 2013
Posts: 130
I've played a few of these in the past. What speed are these? How many BBs do you start with?

I wouldn't draw so many conclusions from so few games though. I used to play hyper-turbos and remember being down over 30 buy-ins before breaking even (on a single day). That means you can win only 20 out of 70 and still be a winning player.

Adjusting your play is something you could do a few times during a HU tournament but if it's a hyper turbo there's only so much time to do it. One strategy I used was to never play the same opponent twice. I guess I wasn't convinced of my own skills but I also didn't want to give anyone the chance to learn my style.
 
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Thu Aug 01, 2013, 10:02 PM
(#3)
CannonLee's Avatar
Since: Dec 2010
Posts: 3,418
Quote:
Originally Posted by raccy View Post
.
Adjusting your play is something you could do a few times during a HU tournament but if it's a hyper turbo there's only so much time to do it. One strategy I used was to never play the same opponent twice. I guess I wasn't convinced of my own skills but I also didn't want to give anyone the chance to learn my style.
Hi,

I'd strongly recommend rematching in heads up sit n go's, especially if the villain is making a lot of mistakes. The thing about not playing the same opponent twice, is that you have to establish new reads on new opponents and overall adjust to the to their playing style, hand ranges and game flow. Not rematching those type of players and just pond hopping to new opponents will effect your overall win rate, just like any other poker game, cash or sng...table selection/opponent selection is essential! This is game of pushing small (and some times huge) edges while exploiting mistakes.


The thing about heads up poker, is there is no set default way to play every single opponent the same way or rather with just one approach to the game. This is a game of all the 'little small things' that add up like bank roll management, variants, structure/levels, opponent types, adjusting, table image, ranges, bluffing, value betting, bet sizing, positional play, and tilt. Almost the same thing that could be said about Limit poker and every other poker variant.


Good luck and good decisions,
CannonLee



Quintuple Bracelet Winner

 
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Thu Aug 01, 2013, 10:27 PM
(#4)
CannonLee's Avatar
Since: Dec 2010
Posts: 3,418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saturnation View Post
Hi all,

Is anyone else playing these?


I have to say, I'm having a blast playing these, even when I lose a tough match, as long as I've played well, I'm happy.

Just looking for a place to talk strategy. I think I've got the basic down and am learning to adjust to my opponent. The one thing I've started to do the last few games, against a more passive opponent whose on a short stack (about <15BB) I start shoving them with hands I'd call their shove with.

I occasionally will sit $1.50 husng, but have nearly stopped playing them in it's entirety and moved up to low/mid stakes (NLHE). When I first started husngs I beat that level for 75%itm for nearly a 300 game sample (extremely small sample) and moved up to 7's while skipping $3.50.

Lately have transitioned back to my roots when playing a husng, O8. I wish games regularly ran above the 7's at FLO8 husngs..the only time I can get any action is at $3.50 and on rare occasions 7's. The good thing is I do not have to fight for lobbies..like you generally would have to at 15 to 30's+ nhle husngs.


If you'd like to discuss strategy about husngs, >>click here<< for the Heads Up Sit N Go | Beginners Questions | or just create a thread.

Attacking passive villains on such short stack depths is great approach and basically should be the standard. Glad to see that you are enjoying this complex game, great results so far and I hope that you do stick with it!


Good luck and good decsions,
CannonLee



Quintuple Bracelet Winner

 
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Fri Aug 02, 2013, 02:43 AM
(#5)
Saturnation's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by raccy View Post
I've played a few of these in the past. What speed are these? How many BBs do you start with?

I wouldn't draw so many conclusions from so few games though. I used to play hyper-turbos and remember being down over 30 buy-ins before breaking even (on a single day). That means you can win only 20 out of 70 and still be a winning player.

Adjusting your play is something you could do a few times during a HU tournament but if it's a hyper turbo there's only so much time to do it. One strategy I used was to never play the same opponent twice. I guess I wasn't convinced of my own skills but I also didn't want to give anyone the chance to learn my style.
Normal speed, 75BB to start with...

Yes, I'm on the roller coaster now... Not sure about the 20 out of 70. From my calculations, at the normal SNG's you need to win 55% to be just over break even.

Oh, there is nothing nicer than a bad player hitting the accept button. I was pretty sure a player was bad and I hit a few good hands and took them down quickly. I jumped when he accepted a rematch. That one went just slightly longer and he quickly hit the decline button after that.


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Fri Aug 02, 2013, 09:56 PM
(#6)
raccy's Avatar
Since: May 2013
Posts: 130
Hyper turbos start with 25BB and if you win 55% you're already making a nice profit. The luck factor plays a bigger role there so variance is greater too.

Rematches favour the better player. In the beginning, you probably shouldn't assume that it's you. At least a lot of players have more experience than you but they might be more skilled than you too.

Getting reads takes several played hands against the same opponent. In a normal-speed HU you can surely get them but hyper-turbos are a bit different. Once in a while the whole thing is over after the first hand. A maniac might push with a hand like A4 and you might call with your QQ. Now would this be a rematch for the skilled player? Surely they would push with a 55 and you would call with your AK too now that you know something about their range. Personally, I'd rather find another opponent who's ready for some post-flop action too.

The thing is that I've run into players who go all-in preflop from the first hand with almost anything (at $7 HU SnG). After 5 folded hands you're down to 13-14 BB from the 25BB that you started with (but at least you've got the reads huh). Then you call with an ace or a king or a pocket pair and wish for the best.
 
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Sun Sep 01, 2013, 09:21 PM
(#7)
Saturnation's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by raccy View Post
...

The thing is that I've run into players who go all-in preflop from the first hand with almost anything (at $7 HU SnG). After 5 folded hands you're down to 13-14 BB from the 25BB that you started with (but at least you've got the reads huh). Then you call with an ace or a king or a pocket pair and wish for the best.
I stay away from the hypers. More bingo than I'm willing to play...

I played two different back to back villains who both just opened raised. Normal is fine as I've got time to wait for a hand. Though getting AA 3rd hand wouldn't hurt in a hyper.

Thanks for the advice. I'm a bit on again off again, mainly due to variance. It's a bit hard for me to be objective and see if I'm that bad or I'm that unlucky.

I've switched over to turbos, which seem to be about the right place for me at the moment. I had a great match where I was down and desperate and doubled up only to get down and desperate again and then get busted. I lost, but I enjoyed the challenge. It made it very clear that one bad call or shove can really swing HU's quite dramatically.


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Thu Sep 12, 2013, 11:30 AM
(#8)
raccy's Avatar
Since: May 2013
Posts: 130
Then there are the turbo knock-out heads-up tournaments. I entered one the other day. My first round opponent was all-in (75BB) 4 times in the first 8 hands. The first time was on the flop, T76. I folded my T4. The last time I called with AQs, they raised 80BB preflop, I called. They showed AJs but they flopped the nut flush so that was it for me. It was more bingo than I wanted but I couldn't figure out a better way to play against them. I'm not giving up on those but something makes me think it's easier to beat the field on HU SnGs.
 

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