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bad played AA?

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bad played AA? - Wed Oct 02, 2013, 03:58 PM
(#1)
GayLooser's Avatar
Since: May 2013
Posts: 62
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im just so lost in these kind of spots... should i be checkcalling these rainbow/disconnected/small boards and hoping to hit set on turn/river? should i be checkcalling pot-sized-bets? tell me some deeper analysis please
 
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Wed Oct 02, 2013, 09:50 PM
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TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,476
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Hi GL,

I would take the line that exploits my opponents most common mistake. If they are over aggressive or frequent bluffers, then passive lines encourage more of that mistake. You give no reads so I'll assume you know nothing other than it's 2NL... the most common mistake villains in microstakes make are calling errors. So my default play will be to bet/fold them to death.

Here in this hand when we get raised on the flop, there's no real draws here, so his range is basically sets and some worse 1 pairs that he thinks are strong enough to raise like 99-JJ. It's actually a pretty narrow range for 1 pairs imo as if he chose not to reraise QQ+ preflop then he's probably not raising the flop either. Also, he can have some weaker hands or bluffs once in a while, but if we 3-bet the flop we probably fold all those out and can't get any value from them. I would just call this raise, check/call the turn, and decide on c/f, c/c, b/f the river depending on how the board runs out, and his turn action and sizings.

When you 3b the flop and he clicks it back 4b, he is going to have a set pretty much always... this is a bet sizing tell from weak players of a monster hand so without specific villain reads I would let it go right here personally.


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Wed Oct 02, 2013, 11:58 PM
(#3)
RockerguyAA's Avatar
Since: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,089
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At 2NL your main goal should be to get value from worse hands. With AA on a very dry low board like this a c-bet makes a ton of sense. That said, once your opponent shows strong resistance to your c-bet it is a serious cause for concern. With no reads there is very little in villain's range when he raises flop, besides sets and some overpairs. You have showed quite a bit of strength by raising in the SB and betting the flop. You have to consider how the situation looks from the villain's perspective. He may be already putting you on overpairs and AK based on your actions. Does a random villain want to build the pot on the flop with 99-JJ (maybe QQ) when you could very easily hold a bigger pair? Maybe, but it is more likely they have spiked a set. Without any history with the villain I would lean towards the side of caution and expect to see the stronger portion of their range the majority of the time (sets). Just let your hand go for cheap and wait for a more promising spot to build a large pot. There will be many of them at 2NL I assure you. Try to get value from weak ranges not strong ones.
 
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Thu Oct 03, 2013, 12:07 AM
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GayLooser's Avatar
Since: May 2013
Posts: 62
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yes but so i have to fold AA all the time when he 4bets me at 2NL? cuz if i cant get it in on dry board , then i cant get it in on 345 or 567 board either, since i can expect 34, 35, 45, or 56, 67, 57 that beats overpairs as well... but on flop 834 i can expect only 34s, 44, 33

but the main problem in my hand was deep stack-sizes i guess.... what stack he should must have for me to beneficially rereraising him to all-in on flop?

Last edited by GayLooser; Thu Oct 03, 2013 at 12:18 AM..
 
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Thu Oct 03, 2013, 05:32 AM
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ArtySmokesPS's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,316
Quote:
Originally Posted by GayLooser View Post
but the main problem in my hand was deep stack-sizes i guess.... what stack he should must have for me to beneficially rereraising him to all-in on flop?
That depends on the stack to pot ratio (SPR) which Dave made a video about. See sessions 20 and 21 on that page, along with the related commitment decision lesson #2.
Generally speaking, you should commit to stacking off an overpair if the pot was 3-bet pre-flop and you started with 100bb stacks, as this will mean the SPR is 6 or less. When the SPR is nearer the dreaded 13, you should usually adopt a pot-control line (checking one street) as it's not a good idea to get all in with one pair.
In the hand you posted, both you and the villain were deep-stacked, so a cautious approach is best. Most of the time, with AA on a random flop at 2NL, I would be happy to get 100bb in on the flop, because many players will stack off with much worse. It really helps to have a read on your opponent, however. Solid nit/TAGs will only get their money in with the effective nuts (sets), but others will go all in with random pairs (even underpairs) and draws. It's very profitable to get your money in with a big overpair against "level one thinkers" that only think about their own pocket nines and fail to see you could easily have TT+, for example.


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Thu Oct 03, 2013, 10:43 AM
(#6)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,476
(Head Trainer)
Quote:
Originally Posted by GayLooser View Post
yes but so i have to fold AA all the time when he 4bets me at 2NL?
Again, on this depth of money I don't think we should be giving him an opportunity to 4b us.

But to answer this question, until you have gathered a read that the villain is a huge monkey with their chips, when we're in a deep stacked situation and get 4b post flop, folding 1 pair is a fine option, yes.


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