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what the hell is going on roland! D:

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what the hell is going on roland! D: - Fri Oct 11, 2013, 10:49 AM
(#1)
GayLooser's Avatar
Since: May 2013
Posts: 62
BronzeStar
http://www.boomplayer.com/en/poker-h...264_0B0B461F43
zoom, no info,
should i just called that river or wut...

Last edited by GayLooser; Fri Oct 11, 2013 at 10:51 AM..
 
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Fri Oct 11, 2013, 10:58 AM
(#2)
morduk666's Avatar
Since: Aug 2011
Posts: 84
I'd rather 3bet and try to steal the pot with cbet in this case.
 
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Fri Oct 11, 2013, 11:43 AM
(#3)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,512
(Head Trainer)
Hi GL,

I think Roland is off for the next couple days, so I'll try and help.

Firstly this is just a fold preflop without reads imo. I like to get involved preflop with a clear idea of how a spot is going to be profitable. It may be an opponent who is exploitable in some way post flop. It may be due to loose spewy players behind. It may be profitable on hand value alone (AA is always going to be profitable to get involved regardless of all other info). And so forth... here we have no reads, and poor hand value vs. a raiser. We have position and deep stacks, but absent any reads of how to best utilize those 2 things against this villain, I prefer to pass this weak a hand value.

Post flop: Betting the flop is fine. When the preflop raiser check-calls, I expect him to have some sort of showdown value hand quite often, like A6, 44, 97, etc. For that reason I'm not a big fan of betting this turn card as it won't get folds from any of the showdown value hands, it doesn't scare them in any way. I prefer to just check behind and take a free card, hoping to hit a K, 9, 4, or even an 8 might be good. On the river, this really goes sideways. Certainly we should bet for value, but after he check-raises, never reraise all in. His holding is exactly 1 of 3 things:

1) 9 high straight. He ties us, so reraising all in gains no extra value.
2) A ten high straight. Reraising all in is a disaster that gets us stacked.
3) A bluff to rep the straight in hopes of us folding 2 pairs and such. A reraise all in gains no extra value as he just folds.

So we should just call the check/raise.


Head Live Trainer
Check out my Videos

4 Time Bracelet Winner



 
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Fri Oct 11, 2013, 01:00 PM
(#4)
Roland GTX's Avatar
Since: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,905
I heard you call my name GL!

I can't add anything to the hand analysis to improve upon what Dave has written. However, I can try to help you with a related issue. I am worried that you may not have the right mindset at the moment. You seem to be focusing on negative aspects. This will not help your game.

Here is a link to a post I wrote a long time ago that may help you The Right Mindset

And, here is another link to a blog I posted just today reviewing Tendler's book The Mental Game of Poker

If you are not having fun while playing at the moment, you might want to take a short breather and take some steps to ensure that you have a positive mindset. Perhaps catch a live training, video, or do something non-poker related for an evening like go on a date.

We all go through periods like this

GL and have fun at the tables!

Roland GTX
 
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Fri Oct 11, 2013, 02:28 PM
(#5)
GayLooser's Avatar
Since: May 2013
Posts: 62
BronzeStar
lulz i like you

i know i ve been sending only all the bad/suckouts hands, but im not running that ultra-mega bad, as u can see in enclosed graph , the real bad play was my first 10k hands, but then i improved my zoom strategy much better i guess wut do u think about my graph? 23K hands is not that small sample i guess or is it ?

PS: about date.. as my nick says im gay, and there are not any gay guys around which i get well along with.... so...
roland, wanna go on date with me ?



edit: personally i dont think right mindset is that cruel... all u need is just stick to your bankroll management and dont tilt ... i quit tables only when i feel sleepy, or without attention .... but overall all u need to play poker is just to think ahead of the hand and pick the best line, like in chess... and u r good to go... no need "good carmas" and others shits...

Last edited by GayLooser; Fri Oct 11, 2013 at 03:00 PM..
 
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Fri Oct 11, 2013, 03:11 PM
(#6)
Roland GTX's Avatar
Since: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,905
LOL! I actually rephrased my reply to something more gender neutral than what I first wrote. My wife frowns upon me dating anyone

OK, I still think you would benefit from a "cup is half full" rather than half empty attitude. However, if you feel good. Then, I will suggest my original approach to 2NL. It works. Looking at your graph and the hands you have posted seems to indicate that you are playing a style that is not optimal at 2NL. You are playing too wide a range and going further postflop than the strength of your hand merits.

Give this a try just for fun:

1. Only play good starting hands from good position. This means no suited gappers, no A6o-A9o. etc etc etc!
2. Never bluff (yeah, you can still semi-bluff c-bet the flop. Just assume that the villain will never fold)
3. Never pay off! Remember "it is just a pair" when facing big turn or river action.
4. Value bet your strong made hands every chance you get! This means sets or better.

These are actually Dave's Golden Rules for beating the microstakes. Play a few K hands making a serious effort to stick rigidly to these guidelines and see what happens.

GL and keep smiling
 
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Fri Oct 11, 2013, 03:11 PM
(#7)
Roland GTX's Avatar
Since: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,905
LOL! I actually rephrased my reply to something more gender neutral than what I first wrote. My wife frowns upon me dating anyone

OK, I still think you would benefit from a "cup is half full" rather than half empty attitude. However, if you feel good. Then, I will suggest my original approach to 2NL. It works. Looking at your graph and the hands you have posted seems to indicate that you are playing a style that is not optimal at 2NL. You are playing too wide a range and going further postflop than the strength of your hand merits.

Give this a try just for fun:

1. Only play good starting hands from good position. This means no suited gappers, no A6o-A9o. etc etc etc!
2. Never bluff (yeah, you can still semi-bluff c-bet the flop. Just assume that the villain will never fold)
3. Never pay off! Remember "it is just a pair" when facing big turn or river action.
4. Value bet your strong made hands every chance you get! This means sets or better.

These are actually Dave's Golden Rules for beating the microstakes. Play a few K hands making a serious effort to stick rigidly to these guidelines and see what happens.

GL and keep smiling
 
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Sat Oct 19, 2013, 10:49 AM
(#8)
Prodigy237's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 336
BronzeStar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland GTX View Post

1. Only play good starting hands from good position. This means no suited gappers, no A6o-A9o. etc etc etc!
2. Never bluff (yeah, you can still semi-bluff c-bet the flop. Just assume that the villain will never fold)
3. Never pay off! Remember "it is just a pair" when facing big turn or river action.
4. Value bet your strong made hands every chance you get! This means sets or better.

These are actually Dave's Golden Rules for beating the microstakes. Play a few K hands making a serious effort to stick rigidly to these guidelines and see what happens.
Hey GL,

It is surprising how one or two tweaks to your game can make all the difference & by following a similar line / strategy [as above] my results at 2NL Zoom (6max) have improved massively.

See my October results [below] & GL at the tables.

BR Tony [Prodigy237]
Attached Images
File Type: jpg October Results (2NL) (620x362).jpg (92.3 KB, 10 views)

Last edited by Prodigy237; Sat Oct 19, 2013 at 11:10 AM..
 

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