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Would you have folded AA in this scenario?

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Would you have folded AA in this scenario? - Fri Oct 18, 2013, 02:04 PM
(#1)
mando_jefe's Avatar
Since: Oct 2013
Posts: 5
BronzeStar
Would've hit a nice big pot, but with QQ on the board, as well as potential flush drawer on the river I laid it down... Keen to know if this was the right play? I know I probably should have re-raised pre-flop in hindsight, but in the heat of the moment I thought calling the raise would get more action from my opponent post flop.

45 man SnG, middle stage. Player to my right was playing very good solid poker, albeit fairly loose.


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Last edited by mando_jefe; Fri Oct 18, 2013 at 02:09 PM..
 
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Fri Oct 18, 2013, 02:13 PM
(#2)
effsea's Avatar
Since: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,609
nope

cheers
 
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Fri Oct 18, 2013, 02:19 PM
(#3)
mando_jefe's Avatar
Since: Oct 2013
Posts: 5
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Lol! Cheers.
 
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Fri Oct 18, 2013, 02:20 PM
(#4)
Christxof's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 256
This was WAY too tight of a play, for several reasons:

1. At your stack size, about 20bb, and with a 4.5bb raise and call behind you, your stack is way too shallow for slow-playing Aces preflop. I am 95% shoving in this spot, and the other 5% I'm raising small, which would only be when I have an excellent read that the opponent will pay us more. I wouldn't just flat-call here unless both myself and the villain were very deep-stacked, and even then only if the opponent was overly aggressive. Aces get weaker in a multiway pot, and flat-calling invites more players to play against us, making our hand weaker.

2. In the event that you flat-call the shove+call anyways, the size of your stack means that you're going to want to be playing for everything you can regardless of the flop.

3. Folding to a bet from one other player when you have an overpair is extremely nitty. He's doing this with plenty more hands than just trips - in fact, there's a chance that his bet makes it LESS likely that he has trips in some situations (although this might not be one of them). He would also do this with KK, JJ, or pretty much any middle pair. If you were deeper, I might think folding on the turn would be an option if he kept up his aggression, the turn was another spade, and he's been known to bet draws aggressively, but in your situation where you have 16bb behind? I'm getting all the money in here in a tournament every day of the week.

Remember, paired boards look scary, and they can cost you money if you're not careful with your reads, but the chances that a single opponent hit the board is much less than any others.
 
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Fri Oct 18, 2013, 02:28 PM
(#5)
mando_jefe's Avatar
Since: Oct 2013
Posts: 5
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Thanks for the input mate, that's really helpful, and is pretty much in line with my own hindsight.

I guess my only excuse is that I've changed my game recently to be a little tighter early and mid stage as I'm learning more about multi table tourneys, and fed up with getting suckouts early on with needless agression like I used to have, coming from playing mainly hypers and 6 man turbos. Working well so far, until situations like this I talk myself out of shoving with scary flops. So with my 'be patient, there's a long way to go even if I'm down to 20BBs' hat on, the villain outplayed me. Damn, wish I had a flux capacitor sometimes...
 
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Fri Oct 18, 2013, 02:52 PM
(#6)
GamblingProp's Avatar
Since: Jan 2013
Posts: 714
Villain didn't outplay you, you outplayed yourself by not shoving preflop.
Villain was actually value betting thinking you had something worse than him.
I will give you some sympathy though, since you are just starting out with mtts.
Try to not put yourself in this kind of situation next time.
 
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Fri Oct 18, 2013, 05:35 PM
(#7)
Low Rated's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 114
Isn't this a tourney? And I'm with everyone here - open shove + caller before you on a 20bb stack, I'm shoving/3-betting that all day. As played, you really cant be folding here. GL.
 
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Fri Oct 18, 2013, 06:03 PM
(#8)
Fadyen's Avatar
Since: Apr 2012
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*Moved to tournament analysis section* - Fadyen



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Sat Oct 19, 2013, 03:18 PM
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JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,819
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Hi mando_jefe!

With AA, I get a short-stacked shove, then a call from a big stack. I'm going to re-shove here. I'm ahead and I want to try to isolate the shorty with the extra dead chips in the pot. If they caller then calls my shove, so be it. I'm in a huge +EV situation and have the opportunity to gain a large number of chips which can then propel me to hopefully a top 3 finish (where the real $$ is in these tourneys).

If this was a satellite bubble, then I could fold preflop, but in any other tourney, I'm reshoving with AA here every single time.

Another reason to reshove here preflop... this way if the opp does have a Q, they can't see that they hit a flop that can beat me without paying the maximum to do so.

Hope this helps and good luck at the tables.

John (JWK24)


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