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300bb+ deep in 3b pot w/ top 2

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300bb+ deep in 3b pot w/ top 2 - Sat Nov 16, 2013, 12:09 AM
(#1)
birdayy's Avatar
Since: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,179
Stats - VPIP: 21, PFR: 15, 3B: 9, AF: 5.5, Hands: 319



Villain is a pretty solid reg who grinds the deep 10nl tables.

Questions:

1) If villain comes over the top of our c/r, what should our action be? Should we be playing for stacks 300bb deep with top 2?

2) Should we 4b pre? He can actually flat IP since we are so deep, and playing AQ OOP in a 4b pot will be extremely tricky imo.

3) Should we be check/calling the flop for pot control or is check/raising fine?
 
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Sat Nov 16, 2013, 06:23 AM
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GarethC23's Avatar
Since: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,273
Well I like just calling the three-bet. I think four-betting is spewy/bad for the reasons you outlined. In this stack situation we should have a very narrow four-bet range because he can punish us in position, at least until you feel like you have a clear hold over your opponent.

On the flop I would check-call, but it is a dangerous line to take.

But danger lurks everywhere!

For example, if he three-bets the flop we are in a world of pain. We hope to bet ahead of some combination draws or bluffs like JT, but his value range has us in jail. Where is Major Payne when you need him? Its a pretty tough spot that depends a lot on your villain, you could fold, or call and check-call all-in on any non Kd Jd Td turn.

I prefer check-calling for a few reasons. Namely we protect our weaker check-calls and we keep both his bluff and value ranges wide. We're going to get sucked out on some amount of the time, but he's got the advantage of playing deep in position, and suckouts are the kind of favours position doles out.
 
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Sat Nov 16, 2013, 09:02 AM
(#3)
birdayy's Avatar
Since: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarethC23 View Post
Well I like just calling the three-bet. I think four-betting is spewy/bad for the reasons you outlined. In this stack situation we should have a very narrow four-bet range because he can punish us in position, at least until you feel like you have a clear hold over your opponent.

On the flop I would check-call, but it is a dangerous line to take.
Do you mean check/raise, or is check-calling the dangerous line?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarethC23 View Post
But danger lurks everywhere!

For example, if he three-bets the flop we are in a world of pain. We hope to bet ahead of some combination draws or bluffs like JT, but his value range has us in jail. Where is Major Payne when you need him? Its a pretty tough spot that depends a lot on your villain, you could fold, or call and check-call all-in on any non Kd Jd Td turn.

I prefer check-calling for a few reasons. Namely we protect our weaker check-calls and we keep both his bluff and value ranges wide. We're going to get sucked out on some amount of the time, but he's got the advantage of playing deep in position, and suckouts are the kind of favours position doles out.
We are only behind 2 combos if he 3bets the flop so it seems hard to fold...

Also, if we raise flop don't we can enable him to make a bad calldown for stacks?

It also acts as protection/charges him to draw.

I do see merits to check/calling however, it's just gonna be very hard to play some cards on later streets imo.
 

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