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50NL 89s from early position - table of unknowns

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50NL 89s from early position - table of unknowns - Mon Nov 18, 2013, 12:45 PM
(#1)
bhoylegend's Avatar
Since: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,261
This is a hand I played during an impromptu jump up of levels from 2NL Zoom to 50NL Zoom one boring Sunday afternoon as I was awaiting my new PC being delivered.

I was extremely hungover. I had also already lost a stack with TPTK against a set when I was practically drawing dead.

All that said, I felt like it was a good idea to open 89s from early position, and would have folded to the 3bet from late position if it wasnt for the blinds coming along for the ride.

I flop fairly well with top pair and a flush draw and check to the aggressor who sticks out a cbet (The blinds go away) and I make the call.

I am led to believe this was a mistake, and I accept that I could and should have raised at this point as I had a tonne of equity in the hand against most holdings.

I post the hand not just for critique of my actual play but I want to crystallise how best to play it, as my play of drawing hands is somewhat backward at this stage.

If I get 3bet on the flop do I GII? His range for getting it in would be overpairs, sets and flush draws (More likely better than mine)?

If I get called on the flop raise do I continue on a relative blank turn card? Still commiting to GII? Do I in fact just shove a blank turn on a relative blank given the size of the pot and my remaining stack?

I'm aware that I went into this hand without a great plan of what I would do on all streets but its done now. I want to make sure I know what to do in future.

 
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Mon Nov 18, 2013, 07:20 PM
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birdayy's Avatar
Since: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,179
No need to 3b GII OTF. Look at the positions. He 3b an EP open and has continued on the flop. This can be consistent with overpairs (which won't fold) and broadway cards (which won't bluff anymore if you raise). Simply, you'd isolate the part of his range that has you dominated and/or drawing to only flush outs.

Given his fishy 3b sizing, and his check OTT, he doesn't rep many value hands when he suddenly bets river (why would an OP check OTT?) so I think it's good to call the river bet.

Oh, and 3bet/folding the flop is bad so if you do 3b you should be getting it in if he comes over the top.
 
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Mon Nov 18, 2013, 07:42 PM
(#3)
bhoylegend's Avatar
Since: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,261
Quote:
Originally Posted by birdayy View Post
No need to 3b GII OTF. Look at the positions. He 3b an EP open and has continued on the flop. This can be consistent with overpairs (which won't fold) and broadway cards (which won't bluff anymore if you raise). Simply, you'd isolate the part of his range that has you dominated and/or drawing to only flush outs.

Given his fishy 3b sizing, and his check OTT, he doesn't rep many value hands when he suddenly bets river (why would an OP check OTT?) so I think it's good to call the river bet.

Oh, and 3bet/folding the flop is bad so if you do 3b you should be getting it in if he comes over the top.
Well, that's what I meant, raising the flop with a view to getting it in if he shoves. His bet would be the flop 3bet the way the action would go rather than mine.

I cant say what I would have done in the heat of the moment but I assume I would have called his shove. I called with much less earlier in the session

As played the river was an easy call. In the end I felt he had something along the lines of what he had. I agree that an overpair is probably betting the turn for the usual reasons.
 
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Tue Nov 19, 2013, 12:50 AM
(#4)
frosty012's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 26
Pre is fine, folding's fine too but it's kind of a whatever spot.

Especially being out of position, I'm just going to be looking to check-raise this flop and get the money in (shove all turns if called). Against black aces (or Ad), we're actually a slight favorite at 52%...if villain has the A of hearts we still have like 45% equity (used pokerschool equity calculator). Against the hand that they showed up with, again we're the favorite at close to 53% equity. C-raising just makes playing the hand much easier and more importantly makes sure that we get full value when we hit our draw (or already have the best hand). In this spot, I think you def missed some value but props on the river call
 
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Tue Nov 19, 2013, 10:32 AM
(#5)
bhoylegend's Avatar
Since: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,261
Quote:
Originally Posted by frosty012 View Post
Pre is fine, folding's fine too but it's kind of a whatever spot.

Especially being out of position, I'm just going to be looking to check-raise this flop and get the money in (shove all turns if called). Against black aces (or Ad), we're actually a slight favorite at 52%...if villain has the A of hearts we still have like 45% equity (used pokerschool equity calculator). Against the hand that they showed up with, again we're the favorite at close to 53% equity. C-raising just makes playing the hand much easier and more importantly makes sure that we get full value when we hit our draw (or already have the best hand). In this spot, I think you def missed some value but props on the river call
Hi Tyler,

Thanks for the hand analysis.

I'm content with the pre-flop action, ideally I wont open suited connector cards too often from early position, but given the two calls I felt I had the chance to take in a flop with a hand that had potential to crack some better hands.

I can see now that once the blinds have gone away and the pot is heads-up that I should be aggressive with the hand. I cant flop much better than I have. And yeah, not surprising of course but HEM shows me as a slight favourite on the flop against his holding too, so even against his draw to the nut-flush I am slightly ahead.

As played, I am kind of pleased with the river call, the way the hand played I felt there was a good chance that I was going to be able to bluff catch in that spot.

I'll know how I should be playing it in future, should I find myself in that spot again, albeit probably at a level a little more comfortable for me and my bankroll.

Thanks again.
 

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