Home / Community / Forum / Poker Education / Texas Hold'Em Tournament Section (MTTs & STTs) /

2nd Nuts on the Turn

Old
Default
2nd Nuts on the Turn - Sun Dec 01, 2013, 12:02 AM
(#1)
85FastLane's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 151
This was in a live tournament I played tonight and I was in a really tricky spot. Both opponents are basically unknown because we're only in level 2 with 20 minute levels.

6 players
Blinds 2/4
Dealer: Opponent1 145 chips
SB: N/A
BB: Me 255 chips
UTG: Opponent2 300ish chips
HJ: N/A
CO: N/A

I'm dealt 26o, Opp2 limps, Opp1 limps, I check

Pot: 12
Flop comes 345

I lead out for 6, Opp2 calls, Opp1 raises to 45, I call, Opp2 calls

Pot: 147
Turn comes A

I check, Opp2 raises 100, Opp1 calls all-in with just under 100, action to me.

This is still early in the tournament, it's only the turn and Opp2 has me covered. I know that I'm pot committed if I call and we will be all-in on the river, so it's either shove or fold. What do you do? I tanked for a while.
 
Old
Default
Sun Dec 01, 2013, 10:32 AM
(#2)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,862
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
Hi Lane!

Preflop, I'm more than happy to see a free flop with a bad hand like 26o.

I flop the 2nd nuts and I like the idea to lead out, but the key is the sizing of it. With 2 opps, a standard bet sizing is 2/3 pot, so instead of leading for 6, I'm going to lead for 9 chips. If the board had a flush draw too, since it would be very wet, I'd actually up my bet from 2/3 to 3/4 pot.

I then get a huge overbet from an opp. If they're playing loose, it could easily be a lower straight (people love to play any A early) or two pair. I'm going to call and re-evaluate on the turn.

The turn A is actually a great card for me. Anyone with is now going to want to play a big pot and so might someone that floated the flop with Ax. With opp 1 having raised the flop, if it looks like they'll bet, I'm more than happy to check and let them do the betting for me. If I think they could check behind, then I'll lead out for 2/3 pot again.

I then get a bet of 100 and a shove. Having the 6 for the second nuts, I'm more than happy to shove here. Yes, the opp could have 67, but there are so many other combinations of cards that players will call with that are crushed (Ax, being the most common). This is one that is definitely worth the risk and a +EV shove due to having the 6 high straight vs a 5 high straight.

Hope this helps and good luck at the tables.

John (JWK24)


Super-Moderator



6 Time Bracelet Winner


 
Old
Default
Sun Dec 01, 2013, 01:47 PM
(#3)
85FastLane's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 151
Thanks John. I think this hand highlights a huge problem in my ranging ability. I figure out what hand I'm scared of, see that it is definitely in their range, and so decide they must have it. I would put 67 in either player's range judging by pre-flop action, and the fact that there's two players being this aggressive makes me think one of them must have it. If it was one opponent I'd be shoving at lot faster. What I need to remember to do is to consider all the other combinations in their range that they would play this way.

As it turns out, I folded. Opp2 won with A2 and Opp1 busted with 53.
 
Old
Default
Sun Dec 01, 2013, 05:50 PM
(#4)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,862
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
Hey Lane!

I totally understand where you're coming from (remember when I was the same way and it will take time and study to get over it). Yes 67 definitely IS in their range, but it's only a very small part of it. In that type of case, if they have it, I tip my hat to them an go at it in the next tourney.

One way to try to get an idea on some of the ranges on various boards is to take some time with pokerstove and throw together some ranges and see exactly how far ahead or behind a hand will be.

John (JWK24)


Super-Moderator



6 Time Bracelet Winner


 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com