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2nl zoom cbet in 3bet spots

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2nl zoom cbet in 3bet spots - Sat Dec 07, 2013, 06:21 AM
(#1)
Praydk's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 504

21/19; CO open 32; Fold to 3b 78; 912 hands
Seems like a good resteal target, the question that nags me is, when to cbet in 3bet pots? They don't call with air so we are not getting called by worse if we are bluffing, and they don't fold their second pairs+, draws, so we are not really making better to fold, except small pocket pairs if villain happens to setmine in a 3bet pot.
I'm totally in the dark here.
 
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Sat Dec 07, 2013, 08:14 AM
(#2)
geoVARTA's Avatar
Since: Oct 2010
Posts: 1,306
Hey Praydk,

I like it. I don't think it matters too much with what sort of hand we are 3betting this opponent given that our 3bet has to get only 67% folds to break even on our play. I would check how much they fold to 3bets when they are in the CO though. 912 hands is a good sample. Another discounted price I see I'd stick with 0.26 (3x + 1bb) It's a mandatory cbet OTF with just Jack high. I mean, there's hardly any other way we can win this pot unless your planning to x/f flop which I think is a bad plan on this board. It's okay to have to bet and fold, there's just so much more in our range that we can continue with which doesn't necessarily makes us exploitable here by taking a bet fold line. Flops, I tend to consider x/fs on are middling connected flops like a JT8, T96ss, QT7, etc. (not with our holding ofcourse, but in general when we are cbetting as a bluff)
 
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Sun Dec 08, 2013, 06:13 AM
(#3)
ArtySmokesPS's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,363
I'd be tempted to check-fold the flop as a re-steal gone wrong. The thing is, you make money restealing vs this player in the long run (even if you check-fold 100% of flops) because he folds to 3-bets so often. When he calls pre, I think you should give up the bluff if you have no equity on the flop, in the same way you should often give up in single-raised pots if you were stealing on the button vs a nit in the blinds. If your steal gets called, it's often a mistake to continue your bluff post-flop (if you have no pair or draw), because the nit that called isn't going to fold unless you fire all three streets.


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Sun Dec 08, 2013, 06:45 AM
(#4)
Praydk's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 504
Does this apply to all 3bet pots with similar opponents? What villains can we cbet?
 
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Sun Dec 08, 2013, 07:14 AM
(#5)
ArtySmokesPS's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,363
If a villain opens wide, but also calls wide, then you can expect a higher success rate with your c-bets in 3-bet pots, since his range is weaker. In those spots, however, you're better off with 3-betting for value with hands that dominate the caller's range. 3-betting a hand like J9s is not going to be great against someone that calls 3-bets often, as he'll have stuff like KJo and K9s in his calling range. i.e. if villain is likely to call your 3-bet with many better hands than J9s, then don't 3-bet in the first place.
That said, if villain plays fit-or-fold, you can 3-bet often and c-bet most flops successfully. Before 3-betting, check a villain's post-flop stats, to see if he folds to c-bets often. It's a bit like making iso-raises. It's pointless iso-raising hands like J9s if the villain always calls pre but doesn't fold to c-bets. So only raise it up if you expect villain to fold to 3-bet very often and/or fold to the c-bet almost as often. Otherwise, you're just bloating the pot with a weak hand that has little chance of winning.


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