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Prepare for SCOOP with Randy Lew

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Prepare for SCOOP with Randy Lew - Sun Mar 23, 2014, 05:54 AM
(#1)
PSO Admin's Avatar
Since: May 2010
Posts: 301
(Administrator)
WhiteStar
Hello,

In the countdown to the next SCOOP series PokerSchoolOnline will be bringing you a brand new series of videos by Randy 'nanonoko' Lew.

Below you will find a list of all episodes published so far. You can ask Randy any question about these videos or Poker in general in this thread and Randy will pop-in from time to time to answer them for you.

If you have a question about a particular hand please let Randy know the following:

- Starting Hand
- Part Number
- Time Stamp of the Hand
- Your Question

For example: Ace King, Part 3, 10 mins 32 secs, Would a 3-bet be better than a call here?

Enjoy,
Team PokerSchoolOnline

Episode One
Episode Two
Episode Three
Episode Four
Episode Five
Episode Six
Episode Seven
Episode Eight
Episode Nine
Episode Ten


Team PokerSchoolOnline - Administration


Last edited by royalraise85; Wed May 07, 2014 at 06:41 AM..
 
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Sun Mar 23, 2014, 01:40 PM
(#2)
nanonoko's Avatar
nanonoko
(nanonoko)
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
Supernova
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSO Admin View Post
Hello,

In the countdown to the next SCOOP series PokerSchoolOnline will be bringing you a brand new series of videos by Randy 'nanonoko' Lew.

Below you will find a list of all episodes published so far. You can ask Randy any question about these videos or Poker in general in the this thread and Randy will pop-in from time to time to answer them for you.

Enjoy,
Team PokerSchoolOnline

Episode One
Episode Two
Yep! Hopefully you guys enjoy the video so far! Let me know, I'll be around!

Randy Lew

Last edited by nanonoko; Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:49 PM..
 
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Sun Mar 23, 2014, 07:45 PM
(#3)
CrazYJohnnie's Avatar
Since: Apr 2012
Posts: 641
Hello Randy, very good videos.

Can you please give some general examples, how cash game ranges differ from tourney ranges, assuming similar effective stacks and different stack to pot ratios.
 
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Mon Mar 24, 2014, 01:01 AM
(#4)
nanonoko's Avatar
nanonoko
(nanonoko)
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazYJohnnie View Post
Hello Randy, very good videos.

Can you please give some general examples, how cash game ranges differ from tourney ranges, assuming similar effective stacks and different stack to pot ratios.
Hi there! I already recorded the footage voiceovers so can't adjust the commentary for the videos but I can help here!

I would say that because there are so many different effective stack sizes in tournaments (because you can't choose your stack size) that the strategies differ a lot compared to cash games. You'll often find short stackers in MTTs that will have tight opening ranges (probably rightfully so) but if they were medium/big stacks then they may open up their preflop ranges a lot more.

Generally cash games are quite deep and the shortest stack is about 40bb rather than 20bb or less like in MTTs. Players considered short stacks in cash games are actually medium to big stacks in MTTs.

Another factor to consider is that MTTs are usually 9 handed vs 6max online cash games. This will skew ranges to tighter in MTTs thus adjusting your strategy against more solid tighter hand ranges.

Hope that helps!

Last edited by nanonoko; Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:49 PM..
 
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Mon Mar 24, 2014, 02:46 PM
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CrazYJohnnie's Avatar
Since: Apr 2012
Posts: 641
Ok, thanks!
 
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Mon Mar 24, 2014, 10:05 PM
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ForrestFive's Avatar
Since: May 2011
Posts: 2,036
Hey Randy,

Just watched Episode One, great analysis.

I've never thought about re-shove ranges with 20bb player dependant. Wow the 77, 3bet - 5bet shove on the stack sizes maybe getting a 4bet fold. In the KK hand with your reads on the guy on your right, I was flat calling keeping wider in. Also the more recreational guy on you left changing their open raise sizes folding to a shove. All things I should be looking out for.


Really good, I understood everything you were talking about and very well explained.
 
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Tue Mar 25, 2014, 04:23 AM
(#7)
Roland GTX's Avatar
Since: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,905
Hey Randy,

Thanks for sharing!

On the KK hand (episode 1), your logic for flatting preflop and on the flop makes sense when considering the ranges and options of the other players at the table - good stuff! My question is, what range of hands would the others be putting you on?

We know you are an elite player and not making many mistakes. If I were at the table I wouldn't expect you to have much of a calling range from ep vs an utg raiser with several short stacks left to act. I would have expected you to fold smaller pairs and raise 99, 1010, JJ and perhaps QQ. I would expect you to fold weak Axs hands or suited broadways rather than risk getting 3b jammed on. This leaves a calling range of QQ, KK and AA and perhaps AJs, AQ and AK. In other words, premium hands that can call a short stacked 3b jam and that also play well postflop in a multiway pot.

I'm probably ranging you poorly. However, are there any hands that balance our flatting range and simultanously keep keep our 3b range from being capped in this situation? Do we need to be concerned that flatting looks more like a very strong hand than 3betting would indicate?

Thanks again! You are an inspiring player!

Roland GTX

Last edited by Roland GTX; Tue Mar 25, 2014 at 07:26 AM..
 
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Tue Mar 25, 2014, 02:37 PM
(#8)
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nanonoko
(nanonoko)
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
Supernova
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForrestFive View Post
Hey Randy,

Just watched Episode One, great analysis.

I've never thought about re-shove ranges with 20bb player dependant. Wow the 77, 3bet - 5bet shove on the stack sizes maybe getting a 4bet fold. In the KK hand with your reads on the guy on your right, I was flat calling keeping wider in. Also the more recreational guy on you left changing their open raise sizes folding to a shove. All things I should be looking out for.


Really good, I understood everything you were talking about and very well explained.
glad you liked it!

Last edited by nanonoko; Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:49 PM..
 
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Tue Mar 25, 2014, 02:47 PM
(#9)
nanonoko's Avatar
nanonoko
(nanonoko)
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
Supernova
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland GTX View Post
Hey Randy,

Thanks for sharing!

On the KK hand (episode 1), your logic for flatting preflop and on the flop makes sense when considering the ranges and options of the other players at the table - good stuff! My question is, what range of hands would the others be putting you on?

We know you are an elite player and not making many mistakes. If I were at the table I wouldn't expect you to have much of a calling range from ep vs an utg raiser with several short stacks left to act. I would have expected you to fold smaller pairs and raise 99, 1010, JJ and perhaps QQ. I would expect you to fold weak Axs hands or suited broadways rather than risk getting 3b jammed on. This leaves a calling range of QQ, KK and AA and perhaps AJs, AQ and AK. In other words, premium hands that can call a short stacked 3b jam and that also play well postflop in a multiway pot.

I'm probably ranging you poorly. However, are there any hands that balance our flatting range and simultanously keep keep our 3b range from being capped in this situation? Do we need to be concerned that flatting looks more like a very strong hand than 3betting would indicate?

Thanks again! You are an inspiring player!

Roland GTX
Hi there Roland!

I think you are right that my flatting range would be quite strong. If I didn't feel comfortable 3betting getting in a hand preflop from these positions then I would probably flat that range. So hands like Ajs AQ 88+ and some suited broadways like KQs. I would probably call short stack shoves with these ranges too. We should be concerned that our flatting range looks very strong but you should more importantly think about the gameflow. We haven't had much history at this table so they don't know how I would play certain hands and it would be a pretty big assumption for them to guess my range to only be QQ+ when I flat without much reasoning.

I think my flatting range would be a bit looser if there weren't that many shortstacks behind for what it's worth or if it was different positions. The nice thing is I expect shiner to be more aggressive and pick up some chips postflop too

Last edited by nanonoko; Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:49 PM..
 
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Tue Mar 25, 2014, 02:48 PM
(#10)
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nanonoko
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Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
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Oh by the way, if you guys want to ask me about a specific hand. Please let me know which episode and the time stamp on when the hand starts so I can find it easier! There will be 10 parts after all!

Example:

27:30: KK - blah blah blah

Last edited by nanonoko; Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:48 PM..
 
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Fri Apr 04, 2014, 03:05 PM
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spand42's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,496
Hi Randy, really enjoyed watching your videos so far, looking forward to seeing your future vids!

Forgive me if this question is a bit vague/general, but I'd like to get some thoughts from you about shove/fold ranges relating to the skill level of the opposition.

For example let's say you're in Middle Position with an M number of approx. 4 or somewhere between 10-12BB with a normal mixture of bigger/similarly size stacks still to act and you're far from the money.

Would your shoving range be wider against a weaker field because they fold too often and don't take into account how wide you're shoving or do you shove a bit tighter because the fish might call too wide in a spewy fashion?

Similarly against stronger fields in higher buy-in tourneys, are you more happy to get into all-in situations because your general edge over the field is smaller?

Or does none of this matter and you try to play some kind of unexploitable/GTO shove/fold strategy when you get short?
 
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Fri Apr 04, 2014, 06:07 PM
(#12)
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nanonoko
(nanonoko)
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spand42 View Post
Hi Randy, really enjoyed watching your videos so far, looking forward to seeing your future vids!

Forgive me if this question is a bit vague/general, but I'd like to get some thoughts from you about shove/fold ranges relating to the skill level of the opposition.

For example let's say you're in Middle Position with an M number of approx. 4 or somewhere between 10-12BB with a normal mixture of bigger/similarly size stacks still to act and you're far from the money.

Would your shoving range be wider against a weaker field because they fold too often and don't take into account how wide you're shoving or do you shove a bit tighter because the fish might call too wide in a spewy fashion?

Similarly against stronger fields in higher buy-in tourneys, are you more happy to get into all-in situations because your general edge over the field is smaller?

Or does none of this matter and you try to play some kind of unexploitable/GTO shove/fold strategy when you get short?
Hi there!

If I'm in the 10-12bb range then I'm pretty much trying to find any edge I can at that point because there really isn't much waiting around anymore for "good" spots. So on that note, I would probably shove wider into a weaker field like you said because they won't call "correctly". Against someone who I feel is calling too light, then I would shove good strong ranges against them and probably not shove a hand like T9dd where a loose player might call my shove w/ A2ss or something like that.

In higher buy-in tourneys, I do think it's true that I wouldn't mind getting in my all-in situations because good spots won't come up as often so I'm going to take any edge I think is good. Extreme example, if someone said I could take a 55-45 all in preflop I would take it even with a good stack whereas at a softer table, I wouldn't take it because I think I can chip up easily. Hope that helps!

Last edited by nanonoko; Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:48 PM..
 
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Sat Apr 05, 2014, 02:37 PM
(#13)
GarethC23's Avatar
Since: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,273
Hey Randy

At 22:20 in Part One you three-bet 77 in the SB to 98,000 on an open of 41,111. Do you think there is an argument that this size is too small out of position?

I think the argument against three-betting your whole range and this hand larger includes the idea that it might discourage the four-bet bluffs that could make 5-betting all-in very powerful here. However, I think we are laying villain too good a price to call and that some of the OOP three-bet and four-bet sizings have gotten too small in spots such as this. I would argue for 111,111. Of course, villain might not properly recognize their flatting price, and therefore might be making incorrect folds despite their good odds.

I think villain can still recognize the leverage of a small four-bet on 108k or 111k, meaning we could still reason we have fold equity with a five.

I think 98,000 also gives the BB a pretty good price to cold four-bet/fold, they are getting a 20k discount in this spot. Though given your tight image at the time you might not be worried about being cold four-bet bluffed at all.

Anyways I wonder what you think of the size you chose, if you thought it was the smallest reasonable size or if you think going larger with your range is a mistake, risking too much. Thanks

Gareth
 
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Sat Apr 05, 2014, 03:57 PM
(#14)
nanonoko's Avatar
nanonoko
(nanonoko)
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
Supernova
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarethC23 View Post
Hey Randy

At 22:20 in Part One you three-bet 77 in the SB to 98,000 on an open of 41,111. Do you think there is an argument that this size is too small out of position?

I think the argument against three-betting your whole range and this hand larger includes the idea that it might discourage the four-bet bluffs that could make 5-betting all-in very powerful here. However, I think we are laying villain too good a price to call and that some of the OOP three-bet and four-bet sizings have gotten too small in spots such as this. I would argue for 111,111. Of course, villain might not properly recognize their flatting price, and therefore might be making incorrect folds despite their good odds.

I think villain can still recognize the leverage of a small four-bet on 108k or 111k, meaning we could still reason we have fold equity with a five.

I think 98,000 also gives the BB a pretty good price to cold four-bet/fold, they are getting a 20k discount in this spot. Though given your tight image at the time you might not be worried about being cold four-bet bluffed at all.

Anyways I wonder what you think of the size you chose, if you thought it was the smallest reasonable size or if you think going larger with your range is a mistake, risking too much. Thanks

Gareth
Hi there,

Smaller sizing at the time of the tournament was a bit of a trend that is probably still prevalent in the deep part of the tournaments these days. What I mean by that is that a ton of the regulars all do this small sizing and it gets the same amount of respect as bigger sizing. So if this is true then for sure makes sense to use the smaller sizing so you don't have to risk as much.

Regardless, you are correct that he is getting pretty good odds to call with hands that have good equity. If I felt my opponent was going to call wider based on pot odds, I would either change my range to a strong range to 3b them with or make it bigger like you said due to pot odds alone. In this scenario, the smaller bet sizing does work if I plan to 5bet all in because say I make it 111,000 and he wants to 4b bluff he would probably need to make it like ~210,000 and if he did that then he's probably not 4b bluffing because it's getting to that point where he wouldn't have enough chips. When I make it that smaller 3b size oop 98,000, if he was to 4b he would probably make it ~185,000 which I think would leave him enough room to consider 4b/folding. So in essence the smaller sizing has allowed me to create situations where people have more "room to play" even with smaller stack sizes or big blinds.

Just remember the most important factor a lot of the times is your opponent. One sizing may work better against one opponent vs another.

Last edited by nanonoko; Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:48 PM..
 
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Fri May 02, 2014, 08:36 AM
(#15)
royalraise85's Avatar
Since: Jul 2011
Posts: 26,028
(Community Coordinator)
Hi guys,

The opening post has been updated with the latest episodes.

If you have a question about a particular hand please let Randy know the following:

- Starting Hand
- Part Number
- Time Stamp of the Hand
- Your Question

For example: Ace King, Part 3, 10 mins 32 secs, Would a 3-bet be better than a call here?

Cheers,
Raiser


Moderator

Bracelet Winner


 
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Sat May 03, 2014, 06:57 AM
(#16)
WiDi1588's Avatar
Since: Apr 2014
Posts: 8
BronzeStar
Although on the language culture I am bad

I will watch carefully to absorb your teaching
 
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Sun Jun 29, 2014, 02:24 PM
(#17)
starpoker718's Avatar
Since: Jun 2014
Posts: 1
Not a question about a particular hand, but in the tenth part of the series I was a little bit confused seeing the specifics of the deal.

At the beginning of the video we see that Bostero10 is getting more prize money than nicofellow, despite having fewer chips. Why is that? Did he convince his opponents that he has an edge against them?

Thanks for the series, I enjoyed watching it.
 
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Thu Oct 02, 2014, 02:49 AM
(#18)
nanonoko's Avatar
nanonoko
(nanonoko)
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 350
Supernova
Quote:
Originally Posted by starpoker718 View Post
Not a question about a particular hand, but in the tenth part of the series I was a little bit confused seeing the specifics of the deal.

At the beginning of the video we see that Bostero10 is getting more prize money than nicofellow, despite having fewer chips. Why is that? Did he convince his opponents that he has an edge against them?

Thanks for the series, I enjoyed watching it.
Sorry for the late reply! I actually don't remember too well why he got more money but I'm pretty sure that he negotiated during deal making that he would only make a deal if someone gave up some money. It wasn't me who gave it to him but that would make a lot of sense. Hope that helps!
 

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