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Stats - Wed Mar 26, 2014, 02:53 AM
(#1)
billnmex's Avatar
Since: Jan 2014
Posts: 61
I played in a tournament and finished in the money. This was my first tournament that I had to buy in and here are the stats. I am wondering how these stack up and what needs improvement.

ThanksYou finished in 68th place (eliminated at hand #113845496379).

150 hands played and saw flop:
- 3 times out of 17 while in small blind (18%)
- 4 times out of 20 while in big blind (20%)
- 20 times out of 113 in other positions (18%)
- a total of 27 times out of 150 (18%)

Pots won at showdown - 7 out of 11 (64%)
Pots won without showdown - 10
 
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Wed Mar 26, 2014, 08:46 AM
(#2)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,814
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The key I'd want to know is.. how many times out of the 18% that you played, did you raise? Comparing the preflop raise % to the number of hands played is one of the keys that I look at (should not be much of a difference). The numbers I normally run are about 20% VPIP (voluntarily put chips into pot) and a 16% PFR (preflop raise). If there is a large difference between these numbers, then there is too much limping going on.

Also, to get more representative numbers, 150 hands is not much. They would mean more if it were say, 10k hands.

John (JWK24)


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6 Time Bracelet Winner


 
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Wed Mar 26, 2014, 10:27 AM
(#3)
spand42's Avatar
Since: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,496
Like John says, 150 hands isn't a huge sample. Unfortunately Pokerstars doesn't give you details on how many times you raise - you'd have to purchase or take a free trial on a stats manager such as Hold'em Manager or Pokertracker to find these numbers out.

Seeing the flop 18% seems reasonable, it's not too loose or too tight but like John said, be careful that you aren't limping/calling too much, when you enter a pot, most of the time it should be for a raise. You should also look to play more hands in late position (Button, Cutoff and Hijack) compared to Early Position.

The pots won at/without showdown aren't really useful because they're based on a tiny sample.
 
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Tue Apr 01, 2014, 09:16 AM
(#4)
Cairn Destop's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,477
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As the other two respondents said, this is a limited sample. I'm also in the same position as you, no tracking software for those more exotic statistics they mention. Those would be helpful, but telling you the numbers are useless or inferring so doesn't help you. Since I don't have the necessary software, I think I can make a better interpretation.




150 hands played and saw flop:
- 3 times out of 17 while in small blind (18%)
- 4 times out of 20 while in big blind (20%)
- 20 times out of 113 in other positions (18%)
- a total of 27 times out of 150 (18%)

Pots won at showdown - 7 out of 11 (64%)
Pots won without showdown - 10



The big blind number tells me there is a bit of betting pre flop. I'm in play chip SNG 45-player games and more than 90% of the pre flop is limping. That you're getting better than 20% playable hands is good. I'll be the first to admit my pre flop cards are usually trash when the BB and I'm just looking for a quick exit.

The small blind number tells me you might be a bit tight on the hand range. For the small blind, that's a real plus. I learned the hard way that even limping from the small blind can turn into a huge chip drain. My goal is to remain as close as possible to 20% for the small blind.

Your overall hand selection is tighter than I've seen in play chips, which is understandable. Everyone I've ever asked has said you should be close to that 20% goal. For this one game, you showed the wisdom behind that advice. Tight early and a wider range as the blinds increase.

Anything over 50% on showdown is a good percentage. The higher the number the better as it shows you are getting a better read on your opposition. I would kill for a 60% or better percentage. It also tells me that you're most likely facing one or two opponents at that point instead of the five or more play chip action encourages.

If you add your wins and compare that to the hands played, 27, you are doing good post flop. You might want to watch the no showdown hand number. If this is too high, you might be scaring too many away from a pot you have won. The idea is maximize chips when possible. Too many uncontested could indicate an aggressive overkill. Something to consider in future tournaments.

Regardless of the numbers, you made the money, which is always something to celebrate.
 
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Tue Apr 01, 2014, 10:09 AM
(#5)
cleobuddy's Avatar
Since: Jan 2014
Posts: 67
Statistics are fine, but they are prone to all the limitations of stats, i.e sample size and understanding what they are really measuring (they often don't tell you situational information unless you parse them).

In one game your VPIP could be very low if you repeatedly find yourself in set mining situations for cheap or it can be pretty high if you happen to be given strong starting hands in late position. I would not be forcing myself to be raising in order to keep one's one game stats in line with any quidelines. You have to play free from the stats and use them in hindsight when they have been measuring a significant average over many, many hands.

It's kind of like variance. Variance has next to no meaning in one hand or in one game. Chance is what is defeating you in the short term and variance is telling you if your averages are way off the standard deviation on a given sample size of outcomes. Variance leads to larger scale swings and it's pretty useless to inform you what you should be doing on any given hand or game. We all want it low, though.

An important stat to keep track is ITM rates and ROI. From those you' ll know pretty quickly if you' re over your head. Great start.
 

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