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Skill League Scoring formula

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Skill League Scoring formula - Mon Mar 31, 2014, 09:12 PM
(#1)
rivercity121's Avatar
Since: Oct 2012
Posts: 560
I have studied the skill league scoring formula which can be found here:
http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/art...coring-Formula

still find it punitive for playing good hands early and suffering bad beats.
Understand it is meant to reduce variance, but still having a hard time understanding why the formula severely punishes early aggression with Category 1 hands ie. AA, KK.
If you suffer bad beats with monsters the formula basically treats you like an idiot.

Any thoughts?

 
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Mon Mar 31, 2014, 09:24 PM
(#2)
Fadyen's Avatar
Since: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,917
*Moved to more appropriate forum* - Fadyen



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Mon Mar 31, 2014, 09:28 PM
(#3)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,809
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The leagues are designed to teach patience due to the penalties for early exits. Many players are way too aggressive, way, way too early and the leagues are setup to teach patience and to get players not to be all-in early without having the best hand after all 5 cards are on the board.

Patience absolutely is a virtue in poker.

John (JWK24)


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Mon Mar 31, 2014, 09:29 PM
(#4)
rivercity121's Avatar
Since: Oct 2012
Posts: 560
I appreciate that.
Which forum is more appropriate?
 
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Mon Mar 31, 2014, 09:33 PM
(#5)
rivercity121's Avatar
Since: Oct 2012
Posts: 560
I totally agree. I posted that today during the Eye of the Trainer Session that patience was the most important skill a player could have.
Still have a hard time laying down AA early lol.

:

rivercity121
 
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Mon Mar 31, 2014, 10:16 PM
(#6)
JWK24's Avatar
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When playing these, I'm not laying down AA preflop.. but the ONLY losses in the bottom 40% or so that I will take is if I'm forced to be all-in with AA or KK preflop. (notice I said forced.. put all-in by an opp. I'm not shoving with them because early, it's too many chips).

Postflop, even AA is only 1 pair.. so it is a vulnerable hand.

John (JWK24)


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Mon Mar 31, 2014, 10:40 PM
(#7)
rivercity121's Avatar
Since: Oct 2012
Posts: 560
Tks John.
I'll try to keep that in mind next time I get AA in early position.

Riv

 
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Mon Mar 31, 2014, 11:33 PM
(#8)
cleobuddy's Avatar
Since: Jan 2014
Posts: 67
Ask yourself this: in a points league do you play for session points or maximizing the value of any one hand. It's not like a cash game whatsoever nor is it like a standard MTT. There 's a premium on surviving which is known to everyone. I suggest you don't fight that. Every type of game has its quirks. Points leagues have their own strategies outside of the game of poker.

That being said there's nothing wrong with going all in early and pre flop against one opponent in the league. You' ll take some hits but the times you will double up will easily compensate you in points if you simply folded every hand after that.

I don't know what the guys who play the points league as if points don't matter are up to. You would have to think they have no real strategy beyond goofing off or having fun playing for a high finish. They do tend make things messy at first. It's best to let them have their fun in the beginning and wait the 19 minutes for half the field to drop off. I don't often get involved in pots before the delta function of the point formula goes positive unless I am up against one opponent and holding a huge hand or am seeing a flop from the blinds.

Doing well in the points league is actually pretty easy, but it is time consuming and, quite frankly, boring at times. I have made a point of challenging myself to fold as many hands as possible to make it interesting and point profitable. It's another level of challenge. I'm always trying to score the perfect game where I have folded all hands, but those pesky AA, KK and QQ keep showing up to thwart my efforts! I play them hard when it makes sense. It's actually pretty hard to not leave points on the table. Most people play very aggressively when their stacks are low, but that's when I make the added effort to just blind out. Not leaving points at the table works out in the long run (at least it has for me in my calculations). Lasting one more turn of the table can often improve your score by 8 points if you' ve reached the 1/6th of field mark. Doubling up when you are very low often doesn't get you any further.

I also work on trying to score long positive points streaks, because when you achieve really long ones (even if they are small) you will be a threat in the league. It's the big negatives that rob you of your time and effort.
 
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Mon Mar 31, 2014, 11:47 PM
(#9)
rivercity121's Avatar
Since: Oct 2012
Posts: 560
I agree. So it makes sense to fold or sit out til top 25%.
Is that really what we are trying to foster here?
A whole tournament of half the players sitting out to make the points?
I guess I will have to decide if that is the kind of tourney I want to play or not....
 
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Tue Apr 01, 2014, 01:39 AM
(#10)
cleobuddy's Avatar
Since: Jan 2014
Posts: 67
What is being fostered is probably the beginnings of awareness, experimentation and the working out of strategies.I can tell that you' ve done some work looking at the points formula and are aware of what levels you need to be getting to in order to score points. That's a big part of the learning experience. Putting in place a strategy to exploit your knowledge would be another.

As strange as playing the league for points based on finish is, some are playing the league for points relating to shooter factor and trickiness factor. Each of those requires a dissection of formulas and the building of a strategy to compete. The proper play to compete for those does not translate to winning tournaments.

The lesson, I think , is that poker is a systems type endeavor. One must study the game and put in place a correct strategy and system for it. It will vary depending on what you play.

I'll be playing for stats points next month and look forward to the different challenge. I'm grateful for this because Hold' em can be a boring game on its own when wins are very far apart.
 
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Wed Apr 02, 2014, 07:22 AM
(#11)
bklove789's Avatar
Since: Mar 2014
Posts: 17
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If you survise to 1800 or lower rank per game, each day play 4 game, you can win prize on end month
 
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Wed Apr 02, 2014, 07:48 AM
(#12)
SasoriHayate's Avatar
Since: Mar 2012
Posts: 101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rivercity121 View Post
I agree. So it makes sense to fold or sit out til top 25%.
Is that really what we are trying to foster here?
A whole tournament of half the players sitting out to make the points?
I guess I will have to decide if that is the kind of tourney I want to play or not....
If you don't like this kind of tourney you can always play some micro stakes MTTs with a range of 1.10-4.10$ buy in.
 
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Sun Apr 06, 2014, 05:58 AM
(#13)
donkkilla76's Avatar
Since: Mar 2014
Posts: 107
real problem is as the games are open to everyone theres always someone pushing you allin when you raise, and if you folded everytime it happened you would end up with no chips anyway, im never one to push allin if i have enough chips to see the flop, but if i have a high pair i will always call, as the person pushing allin will usually has a couple of over cards or a small pp or worse yes you can lose but sitting folding every hand isnt going to help you stay the distance. And yes i lost the last one
 

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